Author Topic: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8  (Read 4177 times)

Offline BillTodd

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2018, 04:38:35 PM »
great looking print  :popcorn:
Bill
wy omnibus Latinis taurus stercore?

Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2018, 03:43:37 AM »
I got some more work done on this engine done before I left for the holidays. With the block printed there was a lot of clean up to do. Since I was feeling lazy from painting my S50, I decided to skip the clean up and go right to assembly. The first thing I did was to glue in the support magnets for the exhaust headers.



Then I installed the magnets on the top  of the block.



The block was flipped over and the oil pan magnets were glued in. I also drilled out and glued in the threaded brass inserts for the bearing caps.



Then the inserts were installed into the back of the block.



With those dry, I installed the block onto the engine stand.



After it was mounted, I turned it around and installed the magnets and inserts for the accessories.



Thatís it for this section. I am currently attempting to print the pieces required to build up the crankshaft. Iíll post on that when I get back.

Till next time

Tony

Offline 10KPete

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2018, 05:38:04 AM »
WOW!!   :ThumbsUp:

 :popcorn:

Pete
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Offline wdeputy

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2018, 08:13:02 PM »
Tony,
A couple of questions, if I may.  How do you like using the Hatchbox filament?  What are you using as an adhesive to glue in the magnets and brass inserts?
Walt

Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2018, 10:59:02 PM »
I swear by Hatchbox filament. It works consistently in all of my printers with no issues. I canít say the same for some of the other filaments I have been working with on this project (more on that next update). For the magnets and inserts I am using CA gel. It seams to work ok.

Tony

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #20 on: December 24, 2018, 11:29:52 PM »
Watching along Tony. You have made good progress on this project. Looking forward to more after the holidays.

Bill

Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2018, 11:37:13 PM »
Well Iím home from the holidays and I have access to the rest of my pictures so letís do an update. The next major assembly is the crankshaft. Itís made up of multiple 3D printed parts as well as bearings and other assorted hardware. This update will cover the making of the parts. To add some color contrast I decided to change filament for these parts. The block was printed in Hatchbox silver PLA. I was recently given a roll of amazon basics blue PLA so I decided to make the crankshaft out of that. The job was split into three batches because some parts required supports and some parts required 80% infill for strength. The first batch was the majority of the components. Here is a time lapse of the build.



As you may be able to tell from the time lapse, I has issues with the parts pealing up.
Here is a closeup of the completed parts.



Here is a close up of my problem children.



On the part on the left, the edge came up from the bed. The pulley to the right was badly warped and the edges were curling up. I was barely able to remove the support material. I dropped the extruder temperature and reprinted the failed parts. The crank web came out ok but this is what the pulley looked like.



I couldnít get the support material out of one of the sheaves. I finally had success when I cut the temperature down to the very bottom of the PLA range and dropped my printing speed in half.



It still isnít very good but I was able to clean it up on the lathe. I made the second batch of parts at normal speed and the lower temperature with no issues.



When I went to make the high strength bearing inserts I had problems with peal up again.



A second round at half speed and I got a set of parts that would clean up on the lathe. By this time I thought that I had a problem with my machine. I thought I might have a partially clogged or worn out nozzle. I was about to tear the machine apart when I realized I had forgotten to make the bearing caps. Since they screw onto the block, I decided that they should be silver as well. I unloaded the amazon filament and loaded my Hatchbox silver. I wasnít thinking and just printed the bearing caps with my default settings...... and it worked like a charm.



The moral of this story is to stay away from no-name generic filament. Pay the money and get the good stuff. It will save you a lot of headaches. The next step is to assemble the parts I made. Iíll probably take a stab at that when I get my S50ish running.

Till next time

Tony


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« Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 04:13:12 PM by AOG »

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2018, 11:43:24 AM »
Thank you for showing the problems with inferior materials Tony  :ThumbsUp:

I can't say I'm that surprised (but glad I didn't have to experience it myself) considering what I learned about ISO 9000 quality control, where you test the materials coming in and the process. If both are OK, you get quality at the end of the line, but it also gave birth to the term GIGO - Garbage In => Garbage Out  :slap:

I plan to get a Prusa i3 MKIII early next year - just don't know if it will be me or my Boss that will pay for it yet.

Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2018, 10:55:35 PM »
Time for the next update. The first step was to install the bearing caps and then sand them down to fit the bearings. I 3D printed a sanding stick and wrapped it with 200 grit paper. Then I sanded the bores until the bearings were a light press fit.



Then working from the inside out I assembled the crank throws. They are made by installing inserts into the bearings then a 2mm alignment rod was cut to length and pushed through the inserts. The inserts were then installed between the end plates and screwed together. I have my doubts about how well the 2 mm rod will resist the torsion but we will see.



Then the outer throws were attached to the inner ones.



If you look carefully you will see that I screwed up on the right side and reversed one of the end pieces in that last picture. I figured it out when I realized that the throws were numbered and and they all faced the same way. Then moving outwards, I installed the front bearing assembly and pulley I struggled so much with. Then the rear bearing was also mounted.




Then I hit a snag. Then instructions are incomplete and donít mention anything about the flywheel. After a quick look at the aft bearing (and a quick email to the creator of the model) I installed four 3mm inserts into the aft bearing assembly. Of course since the flywheel wasnít mentioned in this part of the instructions I hadnít printed it yet. I pulled out the hard to work with Amazon PLA and printed it. It was printed at 190 degrees with 80% infill and a .2 layer height. I used the standard 5 top , bottom and outer layers. Because of the issues with this PLA, the speed was dialed back to 60%



The part printed with no issues. After pealing it up I installed it onto the aft bearing assembly. Here is a pic of the completed crankshaft.



Thatís it for this update.

Till next time

Tony


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Offline 10KPete

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2018, 11:41:59 PM »
This is fasinating! Very enjoyable and informative, Tony. This part printing business has changed a lot since I first saw it 10 years ago.... wow!

 :popcorn: :popcorn:

Pete
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Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #25 on: December 31, 2018, 09:43:03 PM »
The next part of this project was the camshaft. The shaft is built up from multiple 3D printed parts glued together. The first thing was to print the individual pieces. The instructions call for as high of a resolution as possible on these parts. They were printed from my junk Amazon PLA at a layer height of .1 and 80% infill at 60% speed. They were printed with a 5 layer top, bottom and outer surface. Here is a time lapse of the first parts being made.



And here is the first set of parts completed.



Here is the second run with the remainder of the cam parts.



The last part made was the camshaft gear. It was made at a .2 layer height. Here is the time lapse.



Then the assembly started. The individual pieces were added to the center bar and glued together. Here is a picture of the camshaft almost half done.



Here is the completed camshaft.



With the camshaft completed, I removed the crankshaft bearing caps and tapped the holes underneath to take an M3 setscrew.



These set screws will hold the camshaft in place. Then I ran into a problem. The the camshaft wouldnít fit into the block. The printing tolerances were to great. The the hole needs to be reamed to 18mm. That leads to the second problem. I run a US standard shop. Iím not well equipped for metric to the point where I donít have any metric reamers at all much less something as big as 18 mm. I ordered a set of reamers and an additional 18mm one for these bearings. Iíll get back on this project when they come in.

Till next time.

Tony


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Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #26 on: January 06, 2019, 05:46:55 PM »
My 18mm reamer arrived this week and I was able to ream the camshaft pocket.



That allowed me to fit the camshaft and the crankshaft into the block.





While I was waiting for the reamer I printed the water pumps.



They were made in Hatchbox black PLA with a .2 layer height and 25% infill. I also used my standard 5 inner, outer, top and bottom layers. There were no issues with the print.



The water pumps were then assembled.



Here they are mounted to the block.



Thatís it for now

Till next time

Tony


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Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2019, 09:28:58 PM »
Looking really good - great progress  :ThumbsUp:

The big reamer can't have worked hard on this job, but I'm guessing that you still had to very precise in order to make everything run true ...

Offline AOG

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2019, 11:58:07 PM »
Time for a quick update. I had an SD card failure in my camera so I lost a bunch of pictures of this and my boiler build. As a result, this update will be somewhat short on pictures and long on time lapses. Itís time to print some valve assemblies. The first thing I printed was the cam followers, valve seats and retaining hardware. The individual components were small so I printed 16 of each all in one run. They were printed in black PLA with my standard settings.



I had no issues printing the small parts. Next up were 8 blue intake valves and 8 red exhaust valves made with my standard settings.



With the valves out of the way it was time to print the pistons. I was a little concerned about tolerances in the block so I made a set of test pistons scaled in x and y from .97 - 1 and tested them in the block.



It turns out that the full size ones were a good slip fit in the cylinders. I printed the real things in white PLA using a .1 layer height with a 25% infill and my usual 5 shells.



They came out great so I printed the connecting rods in the same PLA with my normal settings. I had 2 that didnít come out well. For some reason I had adhesion issues at the end of the bed where they were printed.



The last thing I did was to make the bearing caps while reprinting two connecting rods at my normal settings. They came out fine.



Thatís it for now.

Till next time.

Tony




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Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: 3D printed Ford Flathead V8
« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2019, 01:18:55 AM »
Tony--Very interesting thread you have going. I am an old science fiction fan. One of the constants in sci-fi are machines called "fabricators". Big machines parked at the LeGrange points in space and programmed to produce fully complete interstellar space ships. You just keep feeding it hi-iron meteorites and it crushes, refines, and separates materials and then assemble all the parts and assembles them.  Weird stuff, I know. Your 3D printer made me think of that.---Brian