Author Topic: Designing the 1905 Regal  (Read 3414 times)

Online Jasonb

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2018, 06:43:54 PM »
The Man from Alibre says No though there are a few dodges that may get equal gears to mesh and turn

The latest update of Professional came with the script to draw gears. It is not something in the new Atom3D which is the pared down version that is like you have. In the past when I have wanted a gear I draw it out in Fusion 360 (free) and then imported it into Alibre.

Did you do a sub assembly of the star wheel parts, I find that sometimes when a sub assembly is added to the main assembly you can loose the ability to move some of the parts.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2018, 06:48:23 PM »

Did you do a sub assembly of the star wheel parts, I find that sometimes when a sub assembly is added to the main assembly you can loose the ability to move some of the parts.

This is where the make flexible comes in, but it can cause some assembly mates to break and it only works one level deep.

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2018, 07:16:20 PM »
Dave and Jason.  Thanks for your thoughts.  Looks like my product is an older, watered down version of thew current Alibre.  It is not the current Atom3D.  It (apparently) looks a lot like the current Alibre- being a predecessor.  If I right click a part, there is no mention of "flexible", if i "right click"the part in the "design explorer" I can see the "make flexible" but it is greyed out.  :(

I'm not using sub-assemblies as I found out that I loose all movement of the parts when I do, though maybe the "make flexible" might work were I using sub-assemblies?

More to delve into. 

Craig

Online Jasonb

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2018, 07:41:40 PM »
Have you anchored the part? that can also stop it moving.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #19 on: December 13, 2018, 08:57:23 PM »
As far as I know the Make Flexible command is only for sub assemblies; maybe the type and number of assembly mates you used on the star wheel has it locked in place. If you brought it in as a single part it should rotate. Can you look at the assembly mates for the star wheel and let us know what you have there?

I think the new Alibre folks have an upgrade to Atom from the Geomagic Cubify program, but I'm not sure what the cost is.

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2018, 09:56:45 PM »
Jason and Dave- Thanks for your mentoring help.

No, I haven't anchored the part.  I have the ratchet and shaft as one part and the star wheel as another.  The constraints are as follows:
1- Aligned the shaft of the ratchet to the star wheel to mount the star wheel on the ratchet shaft
2- aligned a star wheel face to a face on the ratchet shaft to prevent the star wheel from sliding up and down on the shaft
3- set an angle between one face of the ratchet "tooth" to one face of star wheel "prongs" so that they turn together.

I've done this as individual parts to the one main assembly and also as a sub assembly.  Either way the star wheel and ratchet refuse to revolve.

In my "poking around" today I noticed that the Atom3D folks that support the full blown Alibre and a personal version that retails for around $200.  I ought to look into that because when I attempted to see if updates were available for Cubify I got a message that the "server was not available"; a clear sign that they've dropped support.  :rant:


« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 10:00:35 PM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #21 on: December 13, 2018, 10:25:12 PM »
Hi Craig

I wonder if the angle mate is the problem? Can you suppress or delete the angle mate and see if it changes anything?
Not sure about Cubify, but in Alibre you can show the reference planes of any part in your assembly by right clicking on the part and selecting "Show Reference Geometry"  (you also need to have the Toggle Planes  turned on in the view menu. Then you can mate a plane from one part to another, I use this quite often. This may be a better choice than the angle mate.

If you bring in only the star wheel and make it concentric to the bore that it runs on will it spin then? it should.

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2018, 10:40:14 PM »
This discussion has turned into a CAD software thread  :Lol: :Lol: :Lol:

Dave, no.

I have discovered that if I set an angle from one of the ratchet tooth planes and any flat surface on the same axis as that plane on the engine frame, I can change the angle and the ratchet and star wheel will rotate together as instructed.  This will suffice for me, since I really only wanted to do it to look at tolerances (the machined pawl will probably look different anyway).  Actually, I didn't need it to rotate, it was more of a "This ^&$#@( thing ought to rotate, why won't it."  :LittleDevil: :LittleDevil: :ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL:

Craig

Online Jasonb

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #23 on: December 14, 2018, 07:12:24 AM »
I would assemble the ratchet and star wheel as a sub assembly then when you bring them into the main assembly just use constraints 1 & 2

If think you are past the special deals that were being done to bring people with old versions upto date so you will be looking a a new one off payment for Atom3D, it does all that your Cubify does plus one or two other bits that have now been enabled that are standard on the more expensive versions.

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #24 on: December 19, 2018, 09:49:55 PM »
With the Frisco Standard casting set appearing, Iím torn with where I want to spend my time; still Iíd like to finish the design of this engine before I put it away for a future build while I work on the Frisco Standard.

The importance of getting this engine designed while the details are still relatively fresh in my mind took on increased importance as of last week.  I was told that in a tragic accident Ken Eder was killed.  I didnít really know the man but my heart goes out to his family.  On an associated note, access to his marvelous collections and specifically to this engine may no longer be available so best to complete the design now.

I believe Iíve completed the intake, exhaust, and governor assemblies.  In this picture I give you a front view.



Here is a side view of the engine.  You can see the intake manifold on top of the head with the atmospheric actuated intake valve. 


 This rendering is a close-up of the governor portion of the design.  A picture of the actual engine follows.



The governor functions by the brass weight sliding up and down the shaft and levering the vertical arm over to where it catches the exhaust valve stem and holds the valve open.  Simple momentum controls the motion of this weight.  Itís going to be interesting to model this action, and I can see some repetitive trial and re-trial to get things working.

The design is moving toward completion.  Yet to be designed are the flywheels, ignitor, and mixer.   
« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 01:27:01 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig


Offline Zephyrin

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2018, 08:52:26 AM »
Very nice project, I'm following it along eagerly.
I did a gearless engine a few years back, lot of pleasure to design, but without the hit & miss regulation, a little too fiddly, I thought; but I would return on it looking at your design...congratulations and thanks to share   

https://goo.gl/photos/w8T15Z2SAHzGRprA6

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #27 on: December 30, 2018, 02:07:37 AM »
After several days of marathon CAD sessions, Iím about ready to wrap up this design.  I have the mixer and exhaust to design/draw as yet but I thought it was time to post progress.

I re-worked the final assembly, using subassemblies which made the management of the project a lot easier so Iíll go through each of the components and then do a final main assembly. (it will be a miracle ::) if anyone actually reads this from beginning to end butÖ here we go).

The frame assembly with the crankshaft and main bearings installed.  This is pretty much a repeat of what I posted up thread.



Following is the connecting rod.  The original isnít a fancy piece so I couldnít see embellishing the model any.  Iím using split bearings; I donít know if the full size original uses them or not.



This is the exhaust assembly.  It bolts to the underside of the head as youíll see later.  The lever coming out the side is used to ďlock outĒ the igniter when the exhaust valve is held open.  The grey slug on the bottom with the wedge cut in is part of the governor exhaust valve lock-out mechanism.


Here Iím showing a slightly different view.  I also have the exhaust valve lifted against the spring.



This is a view of the intake Assembly.  Itís atmospheric controlled as you would expect.  This assembly bolts to the head immediately above the exhaust assembly.



This is the pushrod assembly.  It has a roller that is captured and runs in a slot in the cam.  The rear pushrod controls the star wheel mechanism which in turn controls the exhaust valve motion.  The front pushrod and clevis is used to actuate the igniter.

 

On to the ratchet and star wheel which are at the heart of this engine mechanism.  The green bracket is mounted to the engine frame and the ratchet, star wheel, and vertical post slide up and down within the bracket.  This motion causes the star wheel to rotate and the alternate high spots / low spots on the star wheel allow four cycle operation.

In this view the mechanism is at the bottom of its travel and the pawl has just finished rotating the star wheel.



In this view the mechanism is at the top of its travel.  Weíre assuming that momentum has lifted the green weight, pivoting the long ďteeterĒ bar so that it will engage the grey slug on the bottom of the exhaust valve (shown in the exhaust renderings above), thus allowing the engine to coast through one or more firing cycles.


Next I show the igniter.  This is the back side, internal to the combustion chamber.  The contact points will be made from tungsten; a material Iíve had good success with in igniter points in previous models.



Here is the igniter, front side (missing the springs).  The ďanvilĒ is the half-moon piece which is connected to the movable contacts.  The hammer is the straight bar.  When in trip, the hammer is drawn down off the stop.  A lite spring bringing the anvil along with it until the contacts close.  With additional motion a stiffer spring is wound as the hammer drawn away from the anvil.  When the igniter trips, the hammer is drawn against the anvil by the heavy spring and then the lighter spring and momentum carries the hammer (and anvil) up against the stop as the contacts abruptly open.   




This is the igniter trip assembly.  The trip can pivot on a mandrel installed through the hole on the upper left of the main part (mandrel not shown).  A spring and stop screw (also not shown) allows the trip to pivot on the mandrel but return to the position as shown.  This is useful when the trip mechanism resets after it has tripped the igniter.


The offset cam and lever is actuated by the exhaust lockout to pivot this igniter trip mechanism away from the hammer on the igniter so that it will not trip when the exhaust valve is locked out.



Finally I give you (for those still with me) the assembled renderings.  This view is near complete; missing only the mixer, exhaust, and water coolant piping.


A little more detailed view of the mechanism.  Here, the push rods have been moved to the full downward position.  The pawl has just completed rotating the star wheel.  In this rendering, the engine is about to take a power stroke, the exhaust is not in lockout.


Here the pushrods are at their highest position.  The exhaust valve has been opened by the star wheel.  I canít seem to get my CAD software to cooperate, but the green lever on the igniter trip mechanism ďshouldĒ have lifted, rotated the eccentric, and moving the igniter trip over to the left a slight amount so that it clears the hammer on the igniter so the igniter doesnít trip.   


Iím hoping to complete this design in a few more days.  Then Iíll probably put it on the shelf with plans to build the model at some future time; maybe this summer.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2019, 01:47:54 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Online Jasonb

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #28 on: December 30, 2018, 07:16:57 AM »
All looks good, look forward to seeing it in metal.

Offline MJM460

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Re: Designing the 1905 Regal
« Reply #29 on: December 30, 2018, 08:13:36 AM »
Hi Craig, reading all the way.

I think I would vote for a little more detail on how you developed the model rather than less.  Of course, I have been a bit reluctant to enter the world of electronic drafting, let alone 3-D, so it all encourages and helps me understand a little more of how to start.  I will have to take the step eventually.

Looking great.  I hope eventually to see it remodelled in metal.  All in its turn of course.

MJM460
The more I learn, the more I find that I still have to learn!