Author Topic: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine  (Read 27266 times)

Online Dave Otto

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #240 on: August 06, 2019, 12:24:18 AM »
Looking very nice!

Dave

Offline Art K

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #241 on: August 06, 2019, 03:33:39 AM »
Steve,
Just caught up on your last set of posts. Good work, lots of details to keep track of.
Art
"The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you" B.B. King

Offline tomherb

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #242 on: August 09, 2019, 02:44:40 PM »
That is truly a beautiful bit of workmanship there, Steve!   :praise2: :praise2:
Tom

Online Vixen

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #243 on: August 09, 2019, 03:29:09 PM »
I can only echo what John, Dave, Art and tom have already said.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #244 on: August 09, 2019, 05:25:28 PM »
when you make the studs that go in AL3  the part that is in the casting is usually a course thread and the part for the steel nut is usually a fine thread ?  When you lap in the valves you usually just lap about a 1/5th of the valve , not the whole valve..??!! this is what i do with my Morris Minor  !!!

Offline Old Bill

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #245 on: August 09, 2019, 06:04:57 PM »
Thank you chaps. You are all being far too kind. I am only an average model engineer and if you read the thread, most of my posts are about getting out of trouble I shouldn't have got into in the first place! As long as everyone is enjoying it as much as I am. You have all given me wonderful advice and a great boost to get on!

I have found a couple of hours this week and so started by fitting the rockers. They just needed a little dressing with a file to clear the slots so that the E-clips could be fitted.





Those clips are tricky things. I bought a packet of twenty and need sixteen for the engine. I had been warned that they are inclined to ping off into the wilderness, never to be seen again but managed to fit them without losing any although I did spend quite a lot of time on my knees!



Then time for the push rods. they were quite straightforward and just needed adjusting to length to fit each position.



Now I can turn the engine and watch the valves go up and down which is most satisfying. It seems that I made the locking bolt in the timing gear a touch short as I can't quite get it tight enough and the gear slides around the camshaft. I will have to make a longer one and dimple the shaft.



Mike asked what the next engine will be. Well, it is this one, a Peerless TC4 lorry engine of 1915 vintage which, as you can see is installed in a lorry.





We have started stripping it down and generally, it is quite nice apart from a couple of horrors. Nothing like a challenge!



If I make another model engine, it will be a Liberty, assuming I live long enough. Has anyone ever made one?

Steve  :)


Offline Old Bill

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #246 on: August 09, 2019, 06:11:17 PM »
when you make the studs that go in AL3  the part that is in the casting is usually a course thread and the part for the steel nut is usually a fine thread ?  When you lap in the valves you usually just lap about a 1/5th of the valve , not the whole valve..??!! this is what i do with my Morris Minor  !!!
Hi Willy.

Yes, I have seen fine and coarse threads on studs in aluminium and agree that it is good practice. Too much trouble for me in this instance though. These are just 7BA at both ends.

I have never heard of just lapping part of a valve. How do you do that? On my lorries, I have always done the whole valve although when lapping, have just oscillated the valve rather than giving a continuous rotation. Always something new to learn!

Steve  :)

Online Vixen

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #247 on: August 09, 2019, 06:40:30 PM »

Mike asked what the next engine will be. Well, it is this one, a Peerless TC4 lorry engine of 1915 vintage which, as you can see is installed in a lorry.

We have started stripping it down and generally, it is quite nice apart from a couple of horrors. Nothing like a challenge!




A 1915 vintage Peerless TC4, nice find.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

Dont worry about the piston, it should pollish out.  :Jester:

Seriously, What do you have to do to a piston for the skirt to get damaged like that?

If it's an iron piston and the bits are still in the sump, could you braze it back together? I did something similar with the cylinder liner of a single cylinder race engine. It went on to win many more races.

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Roger B

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #248 on: August 09, 2019, 06:50:15 PM »
Turn it round and let it run like that  :stir:
Best regards

Roger

Offline Elam Works

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #249 on: August 10, 2019, 12:10:39 AM »
Quote from: Old Bill
If I make another model engine, it will be a Liberty, assuming I live long enough. Has anyone ever made one?

A few years back I had some time to kill and modeled 95% of the engine at 1/4 scale on the computer. I think the water galleries in the inlet manifold(s) and the air plenum are the only things left to do, as they had some of the most complex surfaces and were putting a hurt'n on the computer I had at the time. Did some 3D printing to study machining strategies, and that was enough to scare me off! 

Lou Chenot was working on a pair in 1/6 scale Liberty V12s (you did not specify 4, 6, 8 or twelve cylinders) for a Garr Wood speed boat project. Not sure if that got finished. You can see part of the progress here, scroll about halfway down the webpage:

https://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/Chenot.htm

Alan Ingersoll built a Curtiss V12, a not too dissimilar project, also in 1/6th scale. That looks like it was nearly finished. Again, link to page at the Craftsmanship Museum, and you will need to scroll down the page to get to the Curtiss pics.

https://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/Ingersol.htm

-Doug



[fix typo.  09Aug19  -Doug]
« Last Edit: August 10, 2019, 12:49:10 AM by Elam Works »

Offline stevehuckss396

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #250 on: August 10, 2019, 12:33:53 AM »
The Garwood
Do not be like the cat who wanted a fish but was afraid to get his paws wet.

Offline Old Bill

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #251 on: August 17, 2019, 07:58:33 PM »
My goodness, those are fabulous models. I haven't found them before so thank you for bringing them to my attention. I think a Liberty will remain a pipe dream but a nice one to think about.

The Peerless pistons were broken by the chap we bought the engine from. When he lifted the block off, he alllowed the rods to swing sideways and punch out the sides of two pistons as they articulated over. It has been suggested before that we just put them back but it wouldn't feel right so we will just knock up some replacemnts. Frustrating though as it is an unneccessary job. Oh well.

I have managed to find a couple more hours this week and have continued with my final assembly efforts.

Time to bite the bullet and get on with the pump. Two countersunk screws from inside the housing would have been ideal. However, there was no room to get a countersink in if  the holes lined up with the aluminium crank case so I settled for a tapped hole in line with the crank case and then tapped it and inserted a 1/16" peg.











It worked OK so I set about making a locking screw for the impellor.



Then the O-ring went into the groove behind the impellor before that was installed.





Studs and gaskets for the inlet manifold next.





Manifold was fitted along with the spark plugs and then the exhaust pipes. It is necessary to remove the push rods to fit the plugs, I find.





It is looking very close now but still needs the water pipes, contact breaker and distributor. First though, I must make a display stand so that I am no longer in danger of knocking it over and breaking something. I have found a scrap of mahogany in the garage that will do the trick so watch this space!

Steve   :)


Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #252 on: August 17, 2019, 10:17:07 PM »
Looks amazing - you should be pleased with appearance  :praise2:

Hopefully not too long before first pops  :ThumbsUp:

Offline Roger B

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #253 on: August 18, 2019, 08:08:36 PM »
Splendid  :praise2:  :praise2: There does not look to be much space between the plug conections and the push rods or is it just the angle of the picture?
Best regards

Roger

Offline Old Bill

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Re: 1909 Mercedes Aero Engine
« Reply #254 on: August 18, 2019, 10:08:35 PM »
Thanks Chaps. It is beginning to look like a proper paper-weight!

Yes, the plugs are very close to the push rods which could provide some interesting challenges. The engines running on Youtube appear to be on glow plugs and I think Lars' is as well. Is that right Lars? I wonder if that is telling me something!

Are there any neat clips available for these plugs? I don't really want big push-on connectors as I suspect that they would originally have had brass spade connectors secured with screw-down nuts and I don't want to look too wrong. I haven't searched this forum for ideas on the subject yet but any thoughts would be most appreciated.

Steve   :)