Author Topic: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.  (Read 8533 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.
« Reply #150 on: March 07, 2019, 04:13:52 PM »
Willy, I have noticed the same thing on my models, I got odd looks when telling them I needed to go take MORE pictures of the Lombard and Marion machines - "Aren't those other thousand enough??"  me: "Nope! Still more details!"

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.
« Reply #151 on: March 20, 2019, 01:32:18 AM »
Hi All, am back in the WKSP and have been continuing with the beam after finding some of my drawings are actually wrong !!! .. I have marked out the centres and have filed the ends using hardened silver steel filing buttons...the next job was to file the curves. This is facilitated by putting the beam parts on an illuminated table from underneath. you can see where the flat parts are by putting the beam part against a straight edge. When it is filed to a perfect curve you only see the smallest area of contact with the straight edge. !!! i have also made the inserts that separate the two parts of the beam. Also a visitor to Norwich model engineers  , Eaton Park site .......

Offline crueby

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Re: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.
« Reply #152 on: March 20, 2019, 02:19:09 AM »
Glad you are able to get back into the playshop again! Hmmm... Playshop, I like that...


Anyway, neat trick with the light table! Is that from your instrument making days? Great way to get a fair curve.

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.
« Reply #153 on: March 20, 2019, 02:48:06 AM »
Hi Chris, ..yes the way violins are made is to have a perfect curve from the top to the bottom and also from side to side ... when this is done the violin has the ability to have great strength and like an egg is quite resistant to caving in when the strings exert the pressure through the bridge ... This enables the instrument to vibrate quite freely and produce a good tone. Also when i made instruments i carved the tops and bottom at night and used a single
 angle poise lamp to show up the compound curves when held obliquely to the instrument ... You can see this when holding the instrument with the back towards you and slowly moving it about with just the lamp in front of the instrument......you can also feel for bumps and dips by pushing the palm of you hand over the curved contours....

Willy

Offline MJM460

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Re: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.
« Reply #154 on: March 20, 2019, 09:34:30 AM »
Hi Willy, great to see you back in the shop.

I donít think the light board back light trick would help me, I would still be able to create new flats, but I would be able to see them better.  I think apart from making violins for practice, you clearly have a great natural talent.

As an alternative, I wonder if it would be possible to make a large version of one of those ball turning devices to move the beam past the milling cutter.  It might need the pivot across the other side of the shop to get the right radius.

MJM460


The more I learn, the more I find that I still have to learn!

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Easton and Andersom beam engine at Bressingham.
« Reply #155 on: March 21, 2019, 02:22:54 AM »
Hi  MJM  et al ,  I think my  "natural talent" has more to do with being a bit lazy and procastination  .....A bit lazy as i don't want to make the parts several times  !! and procrastination ..i spend quite a lot of time just thinking about how to make the parts !! so, a bit more work on the beam ....some of the spacers are bolted in place and some are riveted   so ...more drilling etc...

Willy