Author Topic: Loctite  (Read 2272 times)

Offline Pthunberg

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Loctite
« on: October 21, 2018, 04:02:43 AM »
I have searched the forums and found some information on loctite, but I am left wondering how suitable it is for bonding a built up crank shaft for a small 1/2in bore twin steam engine I am building. Loctite 609 has a shear strength of 2300psi, while tin solder has between 2000 and 4000psi. Not sure if I should solder it or use the loctite. It would be much easier to just glue it together. What do you think?

Online crueby

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2018, 04:23:23 AM »
I have used loctite for steam engine cranks that size with great results. Sometimes also through pin the joints but not always.

Offline Thor

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2018, 06:25:19 AM »
 I recently made a built up crankshaft for a two cylinder steam engine and used an anaerobic glue. I did pin the joints after the glue had cured, no problems so far.

Thor

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2018, 01:23:06 PM »
Use the Loctite to get the parts properly located and fixed. Then pin the joints for extra insurance...you won't have to worry about it after that!

Bill

Online toolznthings

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2018, 04:17:41 PM »
Use the Loctite to get the parts properly located and fixed. Then pin the joints for extra insurance...you won't have to worry about it after that!

Bill
I agree on the pinning after the Loctite. Learned the hard way on one crank shaft, but would use the Loctite again, for sure.
Thanks for the visit !
Brian

Offline Pthunberg

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2018, 05:14:39 PM »
Everyone, thank you for the replies. I will go with the loctite and pin the crank webs. Hopefully if all goes well I will post some photos and drawings of the engine when it is complete.

Offline Pthunberg

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2018, 02:13:19 AM »
Your suggestions worked great. The webs were a very close fit on the center shaft and crank pins. I cleaned everything with lacquer thinner added loctite and stuck it together. Waited 24hrs and pinned all of the joints with .0625in hard wire pins.  :) Thank you!!

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2018, 02:15:50 AM »
Nice looking crankshaft. And you won't have to worry about it now. It should hold forever!!

Bil

Offline derekwarner_decoy

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2018, 07:45:07 AM »
Yes, the crankshaft with the profiled crank lobes looks fine.....

I am familiar with larger diameter Imperial taper pins Sizes 6 & 7 [as used in Vickers Twin 4.5" gun mounts] on older HMA Naval vessels]

WW11 British mechanical gun computers with hundreds of miniature gears and wheels used Standard 1:48 Tapered pins Size 7/0 which is 0.0625" diameter large end, however in a engineering working life have not come across "Hard Wire Pins" or how they are inserted and used

Derek
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline Pthunberg

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #9 on: October 24, 2018, 06:36:46 PM »
The pins were made from some .0625 inch diameter wire I had laying about. It was very hard to cut and if it is bent sharply it breaks. Just kind of made up the “hard wire pins” thing sounded good at the time. Not very technical but it seemed to be good for the job. After reading your post and doing a bit of reading i now see that a tapered pin would have been more appropriate for the job. I am not a machinist by trade and am having a lot of fun learning new things. Thank you

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2018, 06:43:28 PM »
Ya gotta go with what ya know! Lookin' good!

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Online crueby

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2018, 08:13:42 PM »
4/0 taper pins and reamers come in handy on the models, have used them in a few places.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2018, 09:30:29 PM »
I use #638 Loctite on everything. It is the only Loctite I use. It works great for assembling small crankshaft, and as an added locking feature, I wait 24 hours for the Loctite to cure, then drill and pin the joints with a piece of 1/16" music wire, which has been (of course) dipped in Loctite before being pushed (not pressed) into place. have never used tapered pins.---Brian

Online crueby

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2018, 09:47:25 PM »
I use #638 Loctite on everything. It is the only Loctite I use. It works great for assembling small crankshaft, and as an added locking feature, I wait 24 hours for the Loctite to cure, then drill and pin the joints with a piece of 1/16" music wire, which has been (of course) dipped in Loctite before being pushed (not pressed) into place. have never used tapered pins.---Brian
Brian, I have been using the 603 retaining compound with good results. Just looked up the 638, sounds similar but can handle bigger gaps than 603? Is the 638 watery or thicker, like the Red?

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Loctite
« Reply #14 on: October 24, 2018, 10:26:48 PM »
Hi Chris ,i have just used some 638 on my flywheel as the key disappeared in transit ..It is very gloopy and dark green and takes about 1/2 hour to start to set then the longer the better to cure. it takes quite a while to start to set so gives ample time to position.....
 willy