Author Topic: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)  (Read 29719 times)

Offline steamer

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #150 on: December 31, 2018, 01:18:58 AM »
How do you like that diamond tool holder Kim?

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #151 on: December 31, 2018, 05:43:01 AM »
It aint the destination, its the ride  8) ;)

Thanks Eric, couldn't agree more! :)

How do you like that diamond tool holder Kim?
I love it!  It is very consistent.  It works well on almost any material, for both facing and turning.  It's easy to sharpen, is quite sturdy, and generally leaves a great finish.

It's my general purpose tool for almost everything now :)

YMMV of course.  For people with more experience, and know what they're doing, this tool may not be quite as magical as it is for me.  But I really like it!

Kim

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #152 on: December 31, 2018, 06:48:50 AM »
Hi Kim,
 Coming along nicely!
Ive got a couple of Kozos books & like you say they are a great resource, lots of hints & tips.

On the diamond tool holders, they are great! Had mine for a couple of years now & they are capable of some serious work if your lath has the power, or you are brave enuff! I got the parting tool as well, can recommend that as well!

Well there 4 hours of this year to go, so have a Happy, productive New Year!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline Steve17

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #153 on: December 31, 2018, 09:36:43 AM »
It aint the destination, its the ride  8) ;)

Cletus

How very true. Every now and then I make something at work on the CNC, yes it is quick but it has very little value to me as it is just typing numbers.

You are making good progress Kim and your pictures always paint a thousand words. It's nice to see how other people overcome problems in a home workshop and what emphasis you put on tooling.

I am really tempted to try the diamond tool holder but to be honest I have so much tool steel it seems a waste.

Steve

Offline JC54

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #154 on: December 31, 2018, 07:59:33 PM »
Is the diamond toolholder the same as tangential toolholder? If it is I made one and find it one of the best things that I have made/bought for the workshop. It cuts superbly and as a learner it is so easy to sharpen and set tool height . I use ordinary HSS tool steel of which I have quite a stock. :old: :DrinkPint: JC
When the Fun Stops,, Stop!

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #155 on: December 31, 2018, 08:02:51 PM »
Yes it is JC. Steve, if you have any 1/4 HSS then alls you need is the holder.

Cletus

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #156 on: December 31, 2018, 10:48:05 PM »
Yup, Cletus answered it - the Diamond is a tangential holder.  It's just someone's product name. These are sold by Village Press.

I finished up the Journal Bearings today.
I used a 25/64 collet to hold the bearings to face off the other side.  Even thought they were barrel shaped, this worked quite well!

I used a 1/4" rod held in the tail stock to insert the bearings that way they were mostly square with the world.


Once in the collet, I faced them off to length, then used a 45o chamfering mill to chamfer the hole a bit:


Heres are all 8 of them:


And that was it for the bearings.
Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #157 on: December 31, 2018, 10:50:01 PM »
Chapter 3.3 - Columns
Next up, the columns.  These will support the axels and connect them to the bolsters.

One of the things I need for the columns is some 1/16 steel cut into strips.  I also need some of that for Arches, which will be coming up soon. So, since I was going to switch the horizontal band saw over to being vertical, I figured Id prepare them all right now.

Here Im cutting the 1/16 steel into strips on the band saw.


And heres most of the strips cut.  I still have one more 0.090 strip to cut (you can see the last strip is marked on the sheet).  The ones on the right are 1/16 thick, the ones in the middle are 3/32  (well, 0.090, but that was as close as I could get to 3/32 in sheet).


That was it for today. It took an absurdly long time to cut those strips!  It's just slow going.

Thanks for following along.
Kim

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #158 on: January 01, 2019, 06:06:00 AM »
Hi Kim,
 Looking good.
One of the reasons I built the new larger table for my bandsaw is the fence that goes with it. A little bit of setup time makes cutting strip like you have just done easy, no need to mark your stock.......it doesnt make the cutting any faster!
Keep up the good work!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #159 on: January 01, 2019, 04:54:12 PM »
Thanks Kerrin!

I could see a good fence being a real help here.  I did try clamping a piece of stock in place to act as a fence, but that caused me more trouble than it was worth, so I just took it off. Turns out that the table is not square with the blade.   After I took the fence off, I saw that when was actually cutting a straightish line the was
like 10o off from being perpendicular to the blade.  Now, that doesn't really matter, but it did make it so when I lined up the fence with the table, it didn't work too well  ::)

Kim

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #160 on: January 01, 2019, 07:48:51 PM »
The vertical saw is one of the handiest, yet, the most tedious and boring machines in the shop. Maybe its just a mental thing, but, it seems I do better if I deeply scribe or score my cut line with a scribe. Seems like vertical saws need a good bit of blade tension also that doesnt show up as much as on a horizontal. Good looking sawing Kim  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:. I bet your eyes and thumbs  are a bit tired too  :old:

Cletus

Offline matthew-s

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #161 on: January 02, 2019, 01:59:10 AM »
Nice work! Im particularly jealous of your surface finish  :)

Im working on one in 3/4 scale as well. Ive been working a full year now and only a bit farther along!

I have the tender done from the frame rails down (less paint). I decided to flip over to the engine until I get to a step that requires the knowledge from building the tender tank or pump. If I run into that Ill likely switch back to the tender.

Keep up the good work and perseverance through setbacks! I had to walk away from mine for a while, in part to cool off after making a few mistakes.

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #162 on: January 02, 2019, 05:26:48 AM »
Thanks Cletus and Matthew,

Yeah, the band saw was tedious. But I kept telling my self that it was better than cutting them by hand with a hacksaw!  :o

Matthew, that's great that you're doing an A3!  You should start a build and post some pictures of your progress.  I'd love to follow along with your work too!

Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #163 on: January 02, 2019, 05:29:51 AM »
Had a little time in the shop today after dropping my daughter off at the airport (always sad to have your kids leave again after the holidays, but it sure is fun to have them home!)

Today was all material prep.  I needed to get those 3/32 and 1/16 steel strips I cut yesterday to a more uniform size.

To start with, I cut them to an approximate length that would be needed for the columns and the arch bars. Cutting them to size made them all much easier to hold on the mill.

Since the strips were longer than my 4 vise, I used some 1/2" parallels to provide better support along the whole length.  I used a combination of parallels to get them supported to the correct height above the top of the vise/parallel, then 1/2 carbide mill to cut them down to width. (5/16).


Even doing them 4 at a time, it still took a while.  But I got them all done, and here they are, all the steel strips Ill need to complete the tender trucks.  The 12 longer ones are the various arch bars for the trucks, and the short ones are for the columns.


Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #164 on: January 03, 2019, 11:10:21 PM »
Continuing work on the columns, I cut 8 pieces of 5/16 square 12L14.  These will be the actual columns for the trucks.  Before milling them I heated them up nice and hot with the torch and let them cool down slowly for stress relief.

The columns have a basic T shape.  The cuts to make the T are very shallow.  I made this cut in the mill as seen here.  Did this 8 times, once for each column.


Then I flipped them all over and did the other side.  This made the T symmetrical.


Then I finished the columns to the correct length:


I should have done this step first!  it was was only supposed to be 1/4" tall.  Doing this step first would have provided more surface area for the vise.  But in the end, it worked out just fine. I only had to remove a 1/16 anyway.


Then I dialed in the center hole for the post and drilled and tapped 1-72.  This threaded hole will be used to hold things together while silver soldering.


Heres the tapping part:


On the long edge, I drilled a close fit 1-72 through hole.  Again, this will be used to hold things in place during soldering.


The last part of the column, is the top connecting bar. These are made from those little short pieces of steel sheet that I cut out the other day.  All I had to do here was drill a couple of holes, 7/8 apart.  Heres that op:


Heres the column family shot: the 4 cross pieces at the top, the 8 columns in the middle (two groups of four), and last but not least, the soldering jig at the bottom.  This is a precisely cut little jig to help hold things square during soldering.


Im assembling the first one, using the soldering jig.  But before I put the top cross piece on, I made a few pops on the end of the columns.  Ive seen Chris do this many times, and now, on Kozos instructions, Im doing it too :)  The idea is that this will hold the other piece away JUST enough to allow the silver solder to wick through.


And the cross piece in place ready for the soldering operation:


Now all I need to do is actually silver solder it.  But that will wait for another day.  Im done in the shop for now.  My feet hurt and Im ready for lunch!  No matter how much fun it is, if I stay out in the shop too long, it quits being fun and starts feeling like work. And I dont want it to be work.  Ive still got a couple of days off before I have to go back to that!

Thanks for checking in,
Kim