Author Topic: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)  (Read 29949 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #75 on: November 24, 2018, 03:19:56 AM »
You could use the 8 practice wheels to make a set of ore cars to pull.


Or some windstorm safe poker chips!

Offline Florian Eberhard

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #76 on: November 24, 2018, 07:19:30 AM »
Hi Bill

Why not machining the wheels down to square and fit new rims on each one? That should at least safe half the work!
You don.'t even need to heat shrink them - I would just use some loctite and glue those rims on the wheel.
That is in the end even more realistic bexcause thats how wheels were made - except the fitting method.

Florian

Offline Steve17

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #77 on: November 24, 2018, 09:41:19 AM »
I would try turning one to the correct angle and just see what it looks like. The only bit that would give the game away would be the thickness of the tyre.

Steve

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #78 on: November 24, 2018, 05:31:22 PM »
Why not machining the wheels down to square and fit new rims on each one? That should at least safe half the work!
You don.'t even need to heat shrink them - I would just use some loctite and glue those rims on the wheel.
That is in the end even more realistic bexcause thats how wheels were made - except the fitting method.

Florian

So, if I do as you and Bill suggested, and machine the wheel flat up to the flange, then put a ring on it, that sounds reasonable, but where do I get a 2 1/16" outside diameter (1 13/16" ID), 13/32" wide ring? If I make them out of the 12L14 round stock, I'll be using almost as much material and turning 90% of it into swarf.  Is that really easier than just starting over?  Maybe, or maybe not...

Kim


Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #79 on: November 24, 2018, 05:36:59 PM »
You could use some DOM tubing but that may also cost as much as the solid 12L14.
https://www.speedymetals.com/pc-3504-8242-2-14-od-x-375-wall-dom-steel-tube.aspx

Dave

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #80 on: November 24, 2018, 05:45:26 PM »
Kim, if you can live with the reduced diameter of the wheels as others have calculated, that would seem the best option other than starting over. The wheels will look right at least.

Bill

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #81 on: November 24, 2018, 05:49:33 PM »
I would try turning one to the correct angle and just see what it looks like. The only bit that would give the game away would be the thickness of the tyre.

Steve

Yes, this is another strong contender.  If I do this, the whole wheel will be 0.084" smaller than its supposed to be and the tender will sit 0.042" lower than designed.  That's almost 3/64".  Maybe not a big deal, but I'm not sure I will be happy.

Ah... decisions, decisions...
Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #82 on: November 24, 2018, 05:59:34 PM »
You could use some DOM tubing but that may also cost as much as the solid 12L14.
https://www.speedymetals.com/pc-3504-8242-2-14-od-x-375-wall-dom-steel-tube.aspx

Dave

Interesting idea, Dave.  But you're right.  Price wise, its pretty close. And that DOM tubing is no fun to machine.  Its very tough and stringy.

Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #83 on: November 24, 2018, 06:01:49 PM »
Kim, if you can live with the reduced diameter of the wheels as others have calculated, that would seem the best option other than starting over. The wheels will look right at least.

Bill

Yeah, I'm not sure if I can live with it.  But I may give it a try on one wheel and see how it looks.   It would be the first step to turning it flat for a tire re-fit anyway.  And it wouldn't matter if I decided to remake them.

Kim



Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #84 on: November 24, 2018, 06:20:45 PM »
Every suggestion made has pros and cons of course. I hate it happened, but sure you will do what works for you and that's what matters really.

Bill

Offline Steve17

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #85 on: November 24, 2018, 07:32:10 PM »
Kim, I totally understand about the tender being low but that assumes the loco is at the top of its travel. Above all it's how you feel and looking at it on display.

Steve.

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #86 on: November 24, 2018, 08:35:19 PM »
Hello Kim,

Like Bill, I sure hate that this happened but ( my 2-cents worth ) you must do whatever makes you happy. As hard as you worked on the last project and look how beautiful it turned out....and only you know if every little part turned out perfect. "Perfect" whatever pleases you.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #87 on: November 24, 2018, 09:12:58 PM »
Thanks for all the support guys!

Haven't had much shop time today.  Somehow, I thought this was Shop Day, but really, its do stuff around the house day (like fix the router, put up Christmas lights, and several other things like that).

But I did manage to slip out into the shop for a few min (like 15 - it really wasn't very long) to give this a try.

One of the suggestions has been just to re-cut the tread angle to 3 degrees and deal with slightly smaller wheels.  So, I did that to one of the wheels and here's the result (one on the left has been re-cut to 3o, the one on the right is the evil 10o angled tread).


Not too bad.  It was fast for sure.


The tread part of the wheel is about 60-70 thou smaller in diameter than itís supposed to be which is a little better than Iíd calculated (I calculated ~0.084Ē).  Probably means my angle settings arenít super accurate, which is not hard to believe.


And with the tread being ~1/16Ē small, the flange is ~1/16Ē larger than its supposed to be.  ~1/32Ē on either side.

If I were willing to deal with the slight delta on the wheel diameter, are the flanges OK as is?  Or would they need to be cut down to suit?

Now Iím beginning to lean this way.  Certainly a lot less work, I don't scrap the material, and it doesn't look bad to me at all (yet).  Plus, thereís nothing that says I canít change my mind and re-do the tender wheels later if it proves to be too big of an issue at some point.

Thanks for all the thoughts on this.  I really do appreciate the thoughts and discussion!
Kim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #88 on: November 24, 2018, 09:20:29 PM »
The extra flange diameter doesn't look bad , but you will have a small flat where the tread was cut down. Not an issue for display, those that run live steam will have to comment on that from a running perspective though. All in all, I think you are on the right track!!

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #89 on: November 24, 2018, 09:21:04 PM »
Wow - big improvement in the appearance!

For the flange, it looks fine, but it would depend on what rails you would be running it on (if any) - if left too tall they could hit the track holding spikes/bolts/etc. If this is for display and static running, looks fine to me.