Author Topic: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)  (Read 27980 times)

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #465 on: October 13, 2019, 05:25:41 PM »
Hello Kim,

That is some beautiful work, really nice.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline crueby

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #466 on: October 13, 2019, 06:13:00 PM »
Very nice - love the family shots!

Online mike mott

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #467 on: October 13, 2019, 07:55:13 PM »
Kim that looks great  the family shot shows it all off well.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Online Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #468 on: October 13, 2019, 10:27:57 PM »
Hi Dave, Thomas, Chris, and Mike!
Thanks for stopping by to take a look and thanks for the kind comment :)

It is pretty fun when it starts to look like something!  :cartwheel:
Kim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #469 on: October 14, 2019, 12:18:55 AM »
Looking great Kim!! Nice to see you get some shop time and you made the most of it  :ThumbsUp:

Bill

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #470 on: October 14, 2019, 04:39:21 AM »
 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Online Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #471 on: October 14, 2019, 05:37:19 AM »
Thanks Bill and CNR!
Kim

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #472 on: October 14, 2019, 06:09:07 AM »
Hi Kim,
 Nice work! Coming on nicely!

 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline Roger B

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #473 on: October 20, 2019, 09:19:14 AM »
Excellent  :praise2:  :praise2: The wood router worked well on brass  :ThumbsUp:  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Online Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #474 on: October 20, 2019, 02:21:02 PM »
Thanks Kerrin and Roger,
Yeah, I've seen other people use router bits on their metal so I was optimistic that I'd have equally good success, and I did :)

Kim

Online Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #475 on: October 20, 2019, 03:33:42 PM »
Chapter 5.4 – Bottom Horseshoe Member and Top Horseshoe Member

Today I worked on the Bottom Horseshoe Member. This is a support piece for the “U” shaped cut out in the front part of the tender. This U shaped cutout in the tender is where the coal would be piled to feed the firebox.
Here’s a picture showing all the pieces that make up this U-shaped section. Today’s focus is the Bottom Horseshoe Member (6), the Top Horseshoe Member (7) will be next, followed by the Verge Board (8) and the Vertical Sheet (9) which makes up the sides for the horseshoe shape.


The Bottom Horseshoe Member is an 11” piece of 1/4” square brass. After cutting and trimming to length, I made the specified cutouts for the corners.  These cutouts will be where the 90o bends will be.  Kozo gives exact lengths for these cutouts and they work out just right!


Next, I turned the part and drilled and tapped the #3-48 mounting holes.  I probably should have waited till the part was formed and then marked the spots for these from the base, but I chose not to.  Kozo’s plans are quite accurate and I had faith that the holes would fit.  And it's SO much easier to work on the piece when it is flat and straight than when its all bent up.  So I just went for it. Worst case I’d just have to do it again.


When I get to soldering the whole horseshoe together, I’ll need holes for the screws to hold things in place.  So I drilled them now. The mating holes in the other piece will be located from these, so it's OK to dill them before forming.


Here’s the part, all ready for bending.


Now, here’s the part where I learned a lot.

I started bending the corners.  I’m thinking – I wonder if I will need to anneal this.  Kozo didn’t say anything about that in the instructions.  Just as I’m thinking this, ‘snap’ the part broke in two.  And I had my answer. Yes, of course, I should have annealed it! :facepalm:

So, before I started over, I decided to try silver soldering the parts together.  And that actually seemed to work out OK.  Now, I wasn’t smart enough to take pictures of my mishap.  I was kind-a focused on working myself out of my stupidity and wasn’t thinking about pictures at the moment.  But here’s one of the repaired spot after silver soldering (and a little filing, cause I was a little too free with the solder) while bending.


And a wider shot of the bending process.  It took a couple of annealings to get the full 90o bends in place, but no more breakage!


And what’s cool, is you can see that the lengths where Kozo had you narrow the width of the brass – they bent nice and evenly. You get a nice even radius there.  That’s pretty cool!


Another closeup of the repair job I did:


And here it is fitted in place on the tender floor.  And yes, all the holes lined up, though it did take some adjusting of the shape.  That’s the other reason I put the mounting holes in earlier.  I knew the spacing for the holes would be correct because I used the DRO.  The question was the radius of the corners.  So, if I did the holes first, they would help me get the right radius.  Does that make sense?  It made sense to me anyway. :)


More pieces to go, but I think this one turned out pretty good!
Kim

Offline crueby

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #476 on: October 20, 2019, 03:36:49 PM »
Nice recovery!
 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Online Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #477 on: October 20, 2019, 03:59:17 PM »
Thanks Chris!
It's always frustrating to 'learn' things, but that's what I love about hobbies.  I'm always learning something :)
Kim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #478 on: October 20, 2019, 07:52:59 PM »
The fix worked out great Kim. Nice looking part and the patched area won't really be seen anyway. Nicely done.

Bill

Online Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #479 on: November 05, 2019, 06:31:01 PM »
Next up is the Top Horseshoe Member.  This is just like the Bottom Horseshoe Member, but it's for the top part :)

This was made from another piece of 1/4" square brass, but quite a bit longer (about 17”).  The Top Horseshoe Member has two sets of curves, one set to make the horseshoe shape, and another set to make the long uprights to hold it at the top.  The cuts in this piece are symmetrical about the center, so I made the cut on one side, then flipped it around and did the same on the other side.  This is the cut used to help for the curve from upright to horseshoe.


After doing the pair of cuts on a different side, I flipped the part to do a 0.040” cut for the Verge Board.  This one was the full length of the horseshoe.  But I only did the sides of this cut. The middle was suspended out over nothing so I decided to wait till I could remove the makeshift stop I’d put in place.  Then I would come back and finish off this cut.


Next, I made a bunch of threaded holes (0-80 and 1-72) for holding the parts together during soldering.


With that, all the work that needed the stop was complete. So I removed it and finished up the 0.040” deep cut mentioned earlier.


Then it was off to the vice to do the bends. Here’s the first step of making the horseshoe.


After a few annealing and bending sessions, I had this:


I used the Bottom Horseshoe as a template for bending.


Next, I went after the upright bends:


A few more annealing rounds and it was all done:


And that’s that for the Top Horseshoe Member.
Kim