Author Topic: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)  (Read 25062 times)

Offline kvom

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #435 on: August 12, 2019, 05:43:01 PM »
I use model scale screws and nuts myself.  You won't find brass screws on a locomotive.  That said, it's a matter of preference.

Confession:  I used some socket head screws on my Kozo.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #436 on: August 12, 2019, 10:41:39 PM »
I agree...it's a matter of what suits your eye. I think the brass adds a nice bit of contrast to the black and red, but that's just me. What did Kozo use?

Bill

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #437 on: August 13, 2019, 05:47:26 PM »
Yeah, I'm trying to be kinda prototypical, but I'm also willing to go a little off the full black to have a little bling.  I liked Kozo's red wheels, and bright brass in various places.

As for bras round head screws here - I'm not sure.  He clearly calls for Rd Head screws, and everything is brass.  But it's hard to tell from his pictures.  I thought he left them bright.  But upon further investigation, that may not be the case.  It's kinda looking more black to me now.  The only color picture I have of Kozo's Pennsy is the slip cover on the book. Everything else is black and white.

I'm going to postpone a decision here and leave them brass for now.  I always have the option of blackening them up later on.

I'm very open to input here, so don't hold back.  I promise to do what I want to in the end, regardless. :naughty:  But I do believe I come to a better decision having other's input. I appreciate it more than you know!

Thank you!
Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #438 on: August 24, 2019, 10:57:30 PM »
I've been out camping with my family, so haven't had a lot of time to play in the shop.  But today I made some incremental progress on the Tank Floor.

I spent about half the time creating the setup.  I had to do a lot of work to make sure my work envelope was big enough for the floor. First off, I had to move the ram head then re-tram.  No small task in itself.  Even then, I figured Iíd have to do one side, then the other, re-calibrating the part for each long side.  But in the end, I was able to use a 3/8Ē carbide mill all around the edge without moving the part.  I JUST squeaked by Ė had to remove the chip cover on my X-DRO which gave me an extra half-inch on the Y-axis.  And I also defeated the stops on both axes which gave me a little more space too.  But it worked :)

After all that, I finally mounted the part on the mill and dialed in as parallel as I could.


I cleaned up the top edge (this was one of the rough sawn edges) then did the left edge (also, a rough sawn edge).  To do the short edges I had to play clamp hop-scotch.  Milled up to one, took it off, then milled to the next one, put the first one back on and took the 2nd one-off, then completed the side.  This is just after completing the edge with one of the clamps removed.


After completing the right side, I then moved to the bottom edge.  This one was easier because I didnít have to move the clamps. But it took a long time (like the top) because it was a long cut!  This is an action shot.  I donít take many action shots, but I had so much time during this cut I went for it!


And hereís the floor square and cut to size.  This took me a long time!


I plan to leave it mounted on the mill table in order to drill the multitude of holes required:


While I considered waiting and drilling when I have the mating part, Iíve found that using the DRO, with the same spacing between holes on each part, the parts fit together quite well.  And if I wait, I just have to do it then.  Iíll check the spacing on a few (where it connects to the frame) but for the bulk of them, Iíll just drill where the plans show.  I will verify on the parts I still have to create yet when they are made.

Thanks for taking a look!
Kim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #439 on: August 25, 2019, 12:39:59 AM »
Nice work on that Kim!! At almost 16" that's a sizeable sheet of stock.

Bill

Offline Roger B

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #440 on: August 31, 2019, 07:47:15 AM »
Just catching up again on here. The truck assembly looks great  :praise2:  :praise2: I'm glad you finally beat that piece of stainless sheet  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #441 on: September 01, 2019, 06:36:53 AM »
Thanks, Bill and Roger!

Continuing with the tank floor, I had a whole bunch of holes to drill.

I started by blueing the sheet and marking the locations of all the holes.  I did this while it was in place on the mill.  I didnít want to have to square it up again!

I also did the calculations so I could use the DRO. I find that doing it both ways really helps prevent mistakes.  And in fact, it did today!  There were two or three times where I was off by a digit in locating a hole and having laid out the locations saved me.  And in one case I had actually calculated the coordinates incorrectly!  Yikes!  But my redundant method caught my mistake. So it was worth the extra effort!

I circled each of the cross points to make them easier to see.  Make sure I got all my holes before I took off all the clamps.  You can see I had to take turn removing hold downs so I could get to the holes under them.


A few of the holes needed to be threadedÖ


And two were reamed to 5/16Ē.  I believe these will be for the water feed linesĖ one from the hand pump, and the other a feed line to the axle pump.


After all the holes were drilled, I flipped the part over and made an 82o countersink.  All the holes that needed this, I circled in red.


When I completed that exercise, I cleaned up the part and mounted it on the tender frame.  The only mistake was that I countersunk two holes on the wrong side.  So those got countersunk on BOTH sides :)  Not perfect, but nobody will see it!




Next, I get to start on the curved sides.  Iím excited about starting this!

Kim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #442 on: September 01, 2019, 01:02:29 PM »
That's a LOT of holes Kim. Happy it all turned out well though!!  I am also looking forward to the curved sides but even now its looking great!!

Bill

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #443 on: September 02, 2019, 04:56:23 PM »
Thanks Bill,
I'm off to have some shop time today! Got to love those 3 day weekends - at least those of us who still work for a living!  :D
Kim

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #444 on: September 02, 2019, 06:53:39 PM »
Yeah I remember those three day weekends. Much better now that everyday is Saturday  :LittleDevil:

Bill

Offline kvom

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #445 on: September 02, 2019, 07:03:07 PM »
Holey base plate Batman!   :o

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #446 on: September 03, 2019, 05:41:25 AM »

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #447 on: September 03, 2019, 06:07:20 AM »
Chapter 5.2 Ė Side Plates

Hereís how I started today:

This isnít REALLY wood - the discerning reader will quickly realize that this is a former for the tender sides! I had some maple from a project many years back and thought Iíd use that. 

Laid out the shape of the former.  This will be both left and right sides, formed together, then cut in half in the next step.


Then I cut the angled edges (sorry, no pic) and rounded the corners on a disk sander that needs a new disk.  But I didnít have one, so as can be seen in the lower left of the picture, it was more of burning the wood than sanding it round :)


Now Iíve set up my router table with a 1/4Ē round-over bit to round over all the edges.


And hereís the completed former:


Following the same process, I made a top-side clamping board. I just used a piece of plywood for this.  No rounded edges on this one.


Finally, I got out the metal!  I cut a chunk of 0.040Ē copper plate to about the right size, blued it up and laid out the pattern.


Cut it out using the scroll saw:


And here we are; all the pieces to shape the sides!

And that will have to wait till next time!
 
Thanks for taking a look!
Kim

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #448 on: September 03, 2019, 11:21:43 AM »
Nice progress Kim - looks like you are busy making parts  :cheers:   :popcorn:

Offline mike mott

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #449 on: September 16, 2019, 05:01:32 PM »
Nice Progress Kim, I smiled when I read about the countersunk holes on the wrong side, I have done that myself a few times, so I know now that I am not the only one.

good looking work on the former, the tricky part is keeping the copper in the correct place as you do each annealing, I wonder if putting in a couple of tiny holes along the centreline where the sheet gets cut would help in keeping it aligned properly Kozo just shows a single clamp in his book, which is probably enough once it is back in the big bench vice. I have found that multiple annealings are a little fiddly to realign after each one.

mike   
If you can imagine it you can build it