Author Topic: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)  (Read 25114 times)

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #420 on: August 11, 2019, 04:33:00 PM »
With all parts powder coated, today I reassembled the Tender frame and trucks.




Iím really pleased with the powder coating! 
Kim
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 05:15:44 AM by Kim »

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #421 on: August 11, 2019, 04:37:58 PM »
Chapter 5.1 Ė Tank Floor

I still had some shop time so started on the Tank Floor.  Kozo specifies brass for this, as he does for everything.  Iíve chosen to use less expensive materials for my build.  Since the tank will be exposed to water, I opted for 304 stainless steel sheet for the base.  I couldnít find 3/32Ē, so went with 0.09Ē  (which is mighty close to 3/32Ē (3/32=0.093)). This cost about half what the brass did.  Seemed like a good trade to me.

But cutting a piece of stainless that large has proven to be a problem for me.  I went to cut it on my 4x6 horizontal bandsaw, placed in vertical mode.  Unfortunately, thereís on 4Ē of throat depth and I need about 6Ē.  So it doesnít matter which way I do it, I canít get the piece through.

I cut several inches in on each side, as far as I could. Then I moved to my scroll saw with a metal blade.  But that just doesnít seem to cut the stainless AT ALL.  I tried various speeds and pressures but just canít get it to make a dent in the stainless.

Then I moved to my wood bandsaw and tried it.  That took out another inch or so, but it was scary -lots of sparks and smoke - it got really hot and stopped making any progress after about 1".  Iím afraid it was hardening the area around the cut, which is making it harder to cut and will make it hard to work later.

So hereís where I am:


You can see the burn marks along the last inch on this cut. Thatís what I did on the wood band saw.  For one thing, I donít have a real metal cutting blade for it.  For another, it just moves the blade way too fast, and I think thatís the main problem. Probably destroyed that blade  :-\


And my last attempt, with my hacksaw.  I know this wonít work.  Just donít have the throat dept, even if I turn the blade 90 degrees, still not enough throat depth.


I should probably get a deep throat hacksaw if there is such a thing.

But for now, Iíll probably just try chain drilling and mill between the holes.  I canít come up with any other way to cut this chunk out of the plate stock.

Thatíll be for another day though.
Kim
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 05:18:16 AM by Kim »

Offline kvom

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #422 on: August 11, 2019, 04:41:39 PM »
Happy to see those brass slotted screws were just temporary.   :pinkelephant:

A floor mounted vertical bandsaw is really a necessity for metalwork.  You still have throat limitations on really large pieces, but they're a really useful piece of equipment.

I painted the Joy engine with automotive enamel and an airbrush, then the Muncaster with powder.  Both do a much better job than rattle can paint.  The advantage of powder is elimination of drips as well as hardness.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2019, 04:45:59 PM by kvom »

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #423 on: August 11, 2019, 05:13:39 PM »
With all parts powder coated, today I reassembled the Tender frame and trucks.




Iím really pleased with the powder coating! 
Kim

Hello Kim,

Really looks good reassembled.

Have a great day,
Thomas
« Last Edit: August 12, 2019, 05:27:59 AM by Kim »

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #424 on: August 11, 2019, 05:18:02 PM »
Hi Kim

The tender frame looks great!

304 SS in any form is not much fun to work with, as you are finding out. If you can get some bi-metal saber saw blade and go slow that will probably be your best bet. You are also going to find that drilling it isn't much easier that cutting it; but with good quality bits and proper speeds it can be done. I deal with it at work but we have the proper tools (Power Shear, NC Punch and Brake), which makes it not too bad.

Not sure how the tank is assembled or sealed but maybe a different material choice could make your life easier; galvanized steel maybe? With proper tinning it can be soldered and is much easier to cut and bend. That is what I used to make the water tank for the Pacific Engine.

Dave

Offline kvom

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #425 on: August 11, 2019, 06:13:12 PM »
You might want to use 303SS instead.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #426 on: August 11, 2019, 06:24:20 PM »
You might want to use 303SS instead.

I'm not sure if 303 is available in sheet form?

Dave

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #427 on: August 11, 2019, 06:49:46 PM »
Wow, quite an update Kim, and the tender frame looks great. It's fun too when big brown delivers lots of new material and other goodies !!

Bill

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #428 on: August 11, 2019, 10:11:56 PM »
Thanks, Thomas, Dave, KVOM, and Bill,
Really appreciate the comments and recommendations.

Yes, to what Dave said - I was unable to find 303 in sheet.  SS sheet only came in 304.  I'm hoping this wasn't a total mistake.  We'll see.  I do have to drill and tap it, but no soldering required.  The tank will be screwed together using a sealant between the sides and the floor of the tank (Locktite Gasket Eliminator).

If I have too much trouble with this chunk of stainless I guess I can always go back and purchase brass.  Or try to find something like your describing Dave, some kind of galvanized steel.

We'll see... It says "Easily machinable"  but it also says it work hardens easily! I'm pretty sure that's what I've done here.

Wonder how you can anneal it?  Heat it and let it cool slowly?  Or do you heat and cool quickly?  Or does it not matter, as with brass?
Thanks,
Kim

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #429 on: August 11, 2019, 10:45:41 PM »
Before you try to anneal it which may warp it beyond use. Pick up some high quality bi-metal saber saw blades and give them a try; keep the speed down and go slow. You may also have some luck with a silicon carbide grit blade (for cutting tile) until you get through the work hardened spot. Do you have a variable speed saw?

Dave

Offline mike mott

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #430 on: August 11, 2019, 11:40:20 PM »
Wow!! Kim the assembled chassis does look great.

Mike
If you can imagine it you can build it

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #431 on: August 11, 2019, 11:57:55 PM »
Chassis looks great Kim!  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn: 

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #432 on: August 12, 2019, 04:52:49 AM »
Thanks Mike and Cnr!

I'm really pleased with how the paint job turned out :)

Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #433 on: August 12, 2019, 05:26:24 AM »
Dave!  You were absolutely spot on!

When you said saber saw, I thought, I have one of those!  A variable speed one, with a few (admittedly random) metal cutting blades.  So this afternoon I gave it a try.  Sure enough, it worked.  It was slow going Ė took me 30 minutes to complete the last 2 inches of the short side, but it was working.

I started down the long side and got another inch or so:


But the motor was getting hot, and it was starting to smell.  I was afraid Iíd burn out the motor.  I think running it at the slow speed in metal was really pushing its limits.  The motor started to sound funny smell was getting worse. So I stopped.  I tried a fresh (not necessarily sharp) blade but that didnít help.

Then, it hit me Ė I have one of those reciprocating saws Ė its quite powerful.  And I have a set of bi-metal blades for it!  THIS is what you were talking about, wasnít it Dave:


Now THAT puppy worked wonders.  Where it took me 45 minutes to do a few inches with the little variable speed saber saw, It only took a couple of minutes to cut the remaining 9-10 inches of the long side using the reciprocating saw!  I used a slow speed, but it was much more powerful and the blade was better.  It just cut right through that stainless.


I filed the sharp burrs off the newly cut edge and set it on the frame and my heart sankÖ Itís like 3/8Ē too short!  And I was so careful to measure multiple times.  And I even left 1/8Ē extra for cleaning up the edges! :o


Then I looked back at the drawing, and thankfully, it shows that the tank floor stops well before the end of the frame.  Apparently, it just overlaps the edge of the rear sill.  So, Iím OK after all!  Whew!  :cartwheel:


Next challenge will be figuring out how to hold this large plate on the mill while I square up all the edges. But I think that's a tractable problem.  I've got a few ideas for that! :)

Thanks for the great suggestion, Dave!  It worked like a charm!
Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: Pennsylvania A3 Switcher (Kozo)
« Reply #434 on: August 12, 2019, 05:36:18 AM »
Happy to see those brass slotted screws were just temporary.   :pinkelephant:

A floor mounted vertical bandsaw is really a necessity for metalwork.  You still have throat limitations on really large pieces, but they're a really useful piece of equipment.

I painted the Joy engine with automotive enamel and an airbrush, then the Muncaster with powder.  Both do a much better job than rattle can paint.  The advantage of powder is elimination of drips as well as hardness.

Hey Kvom,
Sorry, I missed your earlier reply here!

Hmm... I actually still have the slotted brass screws in these pictures.  That's what holds the trucks together.  Do we not like the brass screws?  Do they need to be black?  Does it look overly blingy with the shiny brass showing?  I kinda thought it looked pretty, but maybe that's just wrong.  I'm open to input from people smarter than me in the ways of locos.

As for the bandsaw - yes, I'd love to have a fixed vertical bandsaw for metal.  I've considered converting my wood bandsaw, but that's a 'someday' project.

Thanks for your input on my build.  If I didn't have helpful input from you guys, my work would not get better!
Kim