Author Topic: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?  (Read 6593 times)

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #75 on: January 16, 2020, 08:43:19 PM »
 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Wow! top notch work, thanks for sharing the pics.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #76 on: January 17, 2020, 02:03:03 AM »
George, having operated similar machines I'm finding I want to shrinkify myself and operate your model! After it's finished of course...

Wow.

 :praise2:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #77 on: January 17, 2020, 01:35:33 PM »
When you take the time to "do it right" it certainly shows in the results.  Meticulous work George.  Thanks for sharing the results of your talent with us
Craig

Offline Don1966

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #78 on: January 17, 2020, 04:04:29 PM »
George when it comes to metal work your a true artist. That my friend is an amazing piece of work....... :Love:




 :cheers:
Don

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #79 on: January 23, 2020, 06:15:51 PM »
The blade elevation is operated by the gear boxes and shafts I have shown. Onto the shafts are cast brackets that are attached to long springs that go to the other side of the frame and hook onto other brackets. Trying to stay as close to the original as possible I started machining these more complex brackets.
I first squared up the stock and drilled 3 holes, one for the shaft (.156 dia.), one for the hole through the middle of the bracket, (.125 and the last is a .062 hole for a 0-80 bolt that will eventually hold one end of the spring.
As you can see by the pictures the bracket is quite complex in shape and not very large at all.
To cut all the angles would require the rotary table and some way of holding the stock. The plan was to get both brackets out of the extended brass stock so luckily the large (8.00 dia.) 4 jaw chuck from my Logan lathe just happened to have it's mounting holes positioned so that it could be bolted to the rotary table with the existing bolts and T-nuts. The rotary table was centered and the readout zeroed. I mounted the chuck and clamped the piece of brass into it. The chuck jaws were adjusted to center the 5/16 hole from which all the dimensions originate on my drawing.
I cut the outer profiles then the step-down areas with an assortment of end mills, .094 diameter to .25 diameter.
The bracket has a .047 slot .062 deep around the lower profiles of the bracket. The slot will allow the chain links to be guided as the bracket arms move up and down radially.
I used a .036 slitting saw for this operation and then to cut the first bracket from the parent stock.
I lightly touched the saw blade to the stock (not turning) and set my Z-0-. I then backed the saw away and blued the top of the bracket. I started the spindle and slowly came down in Z until the saw just scuffed the top of the bracket. I then went down in Z to what should have been the proper depth and cut the slot, rotating the part so the slot stayed parallel to the angled edges.
When I got ready to cut the first bracket off the spacing didn't look right but I was already committed so I cut it off. Upon measuring my part I found the slot and width were off far enough that the piece was unusable. Drat!!!!
I then proceeded to cut the second bracket the same as the first but this time I when it came to the sawing operation I figured I would use a more precised set-up. The stack-up height of the rotary table and the 4 jaw chuck it about 8-1/2 inches and the center of the bracket being 8.00 inches from the edge of the rotary table base. My surface gauge with dial indicator wouldn't reach so I had to improvise a little. I have a precision ground 4 inch cube 6 inches long so I set it on the mill table. That got me some height but I still couldn't reach into the center so I clamped to ground parallels to the block letting them stick out about 3 inches so that I could slide the surface gauge over far enough to reach the center. You can see in the third picture the parallels extending toward the rotary table. I set the indicator to -0- and then moved the saw over and indicated it until it read -0-. Now I raised the saw .018 so that  I had the center of the saw at the top surface of the bracket. I then made my cuts on the second bracket and they turned out great. The only problem was I had only made enough stock for 2 brackets so after cutting the second one from the stock I had to clean everything off the table, set up the mill vise, indicate it, mill another piece of stock and drill the appropriate holes then clean the table, set up the rotary table again, mount the chuck, center everything then cut the bracket.
Oh well, that's all a part of machining.
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #80 on: January 23, 2020, 07:46:32 PM »
Tricky bracket! it looks great though, finish is excellent.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Don1966

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #81 on: January 23, 2020, 10:25:35 PM »
i bet you spent a whole day making that bracket ........ :Love:


 :drinking-41:
Don

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #82 on: January 23, 2020, 10:45:19 PM »
Tricky bracket! it looks great though, finish is excellent.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

And... it nearly fits within a 1 cent piece.  Amazing detail work George.  I’m currently working on the governor parts to my model and the parts are small... but they’re not this small.   :)

Following along.   :popcorn: :popcorn:
Craig

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #83 on: January 23, 2020, 11:13:05 PM »
I always hesitate to look into George's threads. On one hand, there's the awesome craftmanship and very motivating. On the other, there's the "I'll never approach that level. Not nearly." And the danger of frustration creeps up. No worries yet. I'm still on the first hand.

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Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline ogaryd

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #84 on: January 24, 2020, 05:26:25 PM »
WOW :o
"Effort equals Results"

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #85 on: February 03, 2020, 12:15:33 AM »
With so many parts to make I just picked a drawing sheet and started machining. This part is the start of the front axle assembly. There is a circular area at the top. This rides against the frame. It pivots on a king pin mounted on the frame. Extending down from this part are the two support legs. On the full sized machine the circular top and the legs are 2 separate pieces which I could have made but the way I made them from one piece simplified the construction and won't take away from the overall aesthetics of the full sized machine. On the front of the circular area is a hollow tube shape into which the tongue tube is inserted. The tube is 3.6 degrees off of the horizontal plane.
The 1:1 part is a casting with the legs being a channel section. So how to build it. There is virtually no way to make the cast part by machining from one piece of brass so I laid out a plan to fabricate the circular area, the legs and the round tube. The circular area was turned and while still on the end of the bar pockets were cut into the bottom to accommodate the legs and nose tube. The rest of the bottom was cut away to resemble the original. The legs were started as a piece of rectangular stock then cuts were made to the sides and outside to represent the leg and upper part of the circular area. The top of the legs were tapped 1-72 for flat head screws.
The tube piece was turned them mounted in the dividing head. The sides of the piece are the same width as the diameter of the tube area. The top and bottom needed to be cut at 3.6 degrees so the dividing head was tilted to the proper angle and the top cut was made. The stock was rotated 180 degrees and the dividing head tilted the opposite way so that the two surfaces would be parallel.
The the inside corners of the legs and tube were filed to match the radius of the corners of the pockets in the circular piece.
The other piece with the other tube is to offset the axle assembly through a yet to be made gear assembly. It was made by turning the tube piece then mounting it in the dividing head. It needed to be tilted at 6.8 degrees and then a 3/16 end mill was plunged through to create the channel for the long stepped shaft. The two pieces were then soldered together.
The first few pictures are of the actual part on the 1:1 machine.
The remaining pictures are the parts I made.
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline MJM460

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #86 on: February 03, 2020, 09:32:03 AM »
Hi George, another amazingly intricate part made in a manner that is a master class for us all.  Thank you for letting us watch over your shoulder as usual.

MJM460

The more I learn, the more I find that I still have to learn!

Offline Don1966

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #87 on: February 03, 2020, 03:17:03 PM »
Love to watch an artist a work....... :Love:



 :cheers:
Don

Offline Vixen

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #88 on: February 03, 2020, 03:41:08 PM »
Hi George,

That looks so good.   :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:

What solder and flux are you using. And how do you stop the other parts falling off while you solder on the last pieces?

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Horse drawn Galion road grader circa. 1913?
« Reply #89 on: February 03, 2020, 05:26:57 PM »
Hi Mike,
I use several 'soft' solders. They vary in melting temperature so I start out with a solder called Stay Brite. It is made by Harris and is a non lead solder with a touch of silver to it. It comes in a small coil with it's own liquid flux. The next solder I use is plain old 50/50. It melts at just a little lower temp than the Stay Brite so if you have to solder a piece near to something that's already been soldered I use this.
The last one is rosin core solder which is mainly used for electronics.
 If I have an assembly that needs structural integrity I will silver solder it with 56% silver content. I'm only going to have a couple of pieces of this build that will require silver solder.
To keep cleanup to a minimum I first clean the parts then assemble them using whatever is necessary to hold them in place, wire, screws etc. I then cut very tiny pieces of solder with my side cutters. I flux and start heating the part. I don't lay the solder in the joint right at the start because as the flux heats it boils a little and that will displace the bits of solder. Once the part is hot and the flux has quit bubbling I lay the solder onto the joint with tweezers. Generally it only takes a slight bit more heat to get it to flow.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.