Author Topic: How does this clutch work?  (Read 6691 times)

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #45 on: September 25, 2018, 03:16:35 PM »
After cutting the four plates of 01 material to size and milling a notch in the area that will be machined away as a last step, I milled a notch 0.100" deep in all four plates and then with them clamped in a vice I ran a mig weld across all four plates in the bottom of the slot. Then any weld which was "proud" of the plate surface was removed with my 1/2" wide electric belt sander. Now I can grip all four plates together in the vice for farther machining operations.


Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #46 on: September 25, 2018, 04:38:41 PM »
Here are a couple of borderline awful pictures of drilling the appropriate holes in the stack of comma plates, and the final shape marked out on the drilled stack. Now it's cutter, file,  and grinder time.


Offline Stuart

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #47 on: September 25, 2018, 05:21:06 PM »
How about red fiber

It’s like a compressed paper and it’s red of course

Jo will know it as the brake linings for old British motor bikes why befor the used an asbestos lining but after the wooden brake blocks


My aim is for a accurate part with a good finish

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #48 on: September 25, 2018, 05:49:25 PM »
One more thing before I cut loose with files and grinders. If you remember, I mentioned making "filing buttons" to accurately file the radii onto the ends of these comma shaped pieces. This shows the filing buttons in place in both ends. They are made from 01, and oil hardened to the max. A file will not touch them. Now when I file the rad on the comma shaped pieces, they should end up perfect. Then the filing buttons go into a jar where I keep all the different sizes I have made.

Online crueby

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #49 on: September 25, 2018, 06:35:24 PM »
Still watching along, great progress...

Online Kim

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #50 on: September 25, 2018, 08:45:53 PM »
Hmm... Have you changed where you're hosting your pictures Brian?  I've been missing them for the last few posts.  Looks like they are being blocked by my work's firewall.

Guess I'll have to wait till I get home to see all your progress.  But I have no doubt its excellent! :)
Kim

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #51 on: September 25, 2018, 10:01:48 PM »
The fingers are all finished, filed and fitted. I am happy with the results so far. Now I can harden them. Those 3/16" diameter pins in the assembly are just scrap pieces I had available. The hardened filing buttons and pieces of 3/16" pins are shown along with the comma shaped pieces. Tomorrow I will make proper length pins with snap rings, and make some washers out of the 01 material I have left.


Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #52 on: September 25, 2018, 10:03:46 PM »
Kim--I am now using Image Shack to host my pictures but that is old news. I changed when Photobucket went nuts and were trying to ransom all of our pictures.---Brian

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #53 on: September 25, 2018, 11:04:39 PM »
Looking really good Brian.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #54 on: September 25, 2018, 11:58:20 PM »
I think the “comma thingy” is actually called a “finger”

Whiskey

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #55 on: September 26, 2018, 01:05:05 AM »
Well, I've never to my knowledge been given the "comma", but remember a number of times I have been given the "finger"---you're probably right.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #56 on: September 26, 2018, 10:20:42 PM »
This was one of the days when I worked all day and don't have a lot to show for it. I drilled and tapped the end of the shaft for a threaded stud, shortened up a spring to fit, and drilled and tapped the holes to mount the sprocket. The sprocket had to be bored to fit on the hub. Tomorrow I'll make the proper pivot pins.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #57 on: September 27, 2018, 12:26:14 AM »
I think this clutch is going to work. Now that I have the spring in place and the appropriate washers and bushings made, I have assembled it with a clamp ring on the side which will normally hold the friction disc and flywheel. The sliding cone does indeed make the four "fingers" expand when pushed by hand, and the resulting action makes the entire pack expand about 1/16" linearly. That isn't much, but  it's surely enough to clamp the friction disc securely between two faces. I find this quite exciting.

Online crueby

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #58 on: September 27, 2018, 12:42:42 AM »
Excellent, great when it all comes together!

Offline Ian S C

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Re: How does this clutch work?
« Reply #59 on: September 27, 2018, 03:38:35 AM »
With the friction disc floating, leather or other flexable material could be glued on both sides of a steel , or just about any rigid and thin disc.
Ian S C