Author Topic: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage  (Read 27173 times)

Offline bent

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #180 on: October 31, 2018, 04:46:16 PM »
Good to see progress being made, keep up the good work, Thomas!

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #181 on: October 31, 2018, 07:27:34 PM »
Good to see progress being made, keep up the good work, Thomas!

Hello Bent,

Things are moving slowly now with these smaller parts being made. However I am really close to getting it to a rolling chassis and that will be a major step forward.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #182 on: November 01, 2018, 09:14:20 PM »
Hello everyone,

Welded the Cross Link Arms on to both Front Spindles today. Also applied two coats of primer and two coats of black paint, all they need now are the Ball Joint Links to be bolted in place. I cut the tube Front Axle to the correct length, then marked half-circle cut out on both ends. I will mill out the half-circles which will allow the King Pin Bushing to be welded in place. I plan on making a jig-fixture to hold all the Front Axle parts in place when I weld everything. Another productive and fun day in the shop.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Online crueby

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #183 on: November 01, 2018, 09:57:10 PM »
Beauty!
All your photos need are a 2-foot-diameter penny to make it all look like a small model.   :Lol:

 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #184 on: November 02, 2018, 09:12:56 PM »
Hello everyone,

Well another long day in the shop but did get a lot of work completed. Finished both Spindles and milled out the half-circles on each end of the Axle Tube. Made a super heavy duty jig-fixture to hold all the parts in place while being welded. Applied a coat of primer to the Axle after letting all the welds cool to ambient and got it reinstalled on the Chassis and then bolted each Spindle on to the Axle. I am attaching some progress photos and a short video.

Have a great day,
Thomas


Online b.lindsey

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #185 on: November 02, 2018, 09:23:35 PM »
You had a good day in the shop. Looking good  :ThumbsUp:

Bill

Offline Vixen

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #186 on: November 02, 2018, 09:23:49 PM »
Hi Thomas,

I am surprised to see no caster angle to help with self centering of the steering. I would have expected the spindles to lean backwards at about 10 to 15 degrees.

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #187 on: November 02, 2018, 09:32:46 PM »
Hi Thomas,

I am surprised to see no caster angle to help with self centering of the steering. I would have expected the spindles to lean backwards at about 10 to 15 degrees.

Mike

Hello Mike,

I actually thought about that and even made some drawings at 5 and 8 degrees. After looking at all the photos on some of the original Buggies I decided not to include the angle. I think because the original builders were Coach, Buggy, Wagon companies, etc, that they did not know about "tracking" and just used what they normally built.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Vixen

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #188 on: November 02, 2018, 09:40:12 PM »
Hello Mike,

I actually thought about that and even made some drawings at 5 and 8 degrees. After looking at all the photos on some of the original Buggies I decided not to include the angle. I think because the original builders were Coach, Buggy, Wagon companies, etc, that they did not know about "tracking" and just used what they normally built.

Have a great day,
Thomas

OK it's always good to be true to the original. The steering may be a little twitchy as a result, but your carriage will not be traveling so fast for this to be a problem. It's not like you are going to be flat out on the freeway. You can always cut and reweld the mounting plates if you have to.

Keep up the good work

Mike
It is the journey that matters, not the destination

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #189 on: November 02, 2018, 09:50:56 PM »
Hello Mike,

I actually thought about that and even made some drawings at 5 and 8 degrees. After looking at all the photos on some of the original Buggies I decided not to include the angle. I think because the original builders were Coach, Buggy, Wagon companies, etc, that they did not know about "tracking" and just used what they normally built.

Have a great day,
Thomas

OK it's always good to be true to the original. The steering may be a little twitchy as a result, but your carriage will not be traveling so fast for this to be a problem. It's not like you are going to be flat out on the freeway. You can always cut and reweld the mounting plates if you have to.

Keep up the good work

Mike


Hey again Mike,

One of my neighbors was over yesterday and ask me why I did not install un-equal A-arms.....and then he laughed  ;D. He also wants me to install a Chevy 350 and a 4-speed transmission. He is an old hot rodder and even his lawnmower runs fast.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #190 on: November 02, 2018, 09:55:02 PM »
You had a good day in the shop. Looking good  :ThumbsUp:

Bill


Hello Bill,

Sure is nice to see half of the "wheel" parts completed. I need to make some spacer bushings for the front wheels and then they can be installed.

Thank you and have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Kim

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #191 on: November 03, 2018, 04:25:44 AM »
Nice progress, Thomas, and nice video.
You're really moving along with this project!
Kim

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #192 on: November 03, 2018, 07:27:46 AM »
Nice progress, Thomas, and nice video.
You're really moving along with this project!
Kim


Hello Kim,

Thank you. At times it seems that I am in a time warp....2 days of work and no visible results. Then it all comes together and I get something completed.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #193 on: November 03, 2018, 03:22:48 PM »
Hello everyone,
   
I have run into a strange problem with the Axle on each of the Spindles. This morning I tried to install the wheels on to the Spindles and could not get them to slide on past the end of the threads. I can take a piece of the 3/4 round bar that the Axles were made out of and slide it in the bearings with no problem. Note-1, it feels like a hydraulic cylinder, in other words slides OK but No slack, No tolerance.

I checked the OD on the raw material and the middle of the axle and both showed .748". Then I checked just past the “cut / gap” area going away from the threads and found it to be .751". Note-2, see photo showing the cut/gap that I machined for clearance when threading.

I hand filed the .751" area until I could get one of the bearings to slide on ( see photo ) and it felt like the raw material, No slack, No tolerance. The bearings must be an absolute .750" ID. There was a slight resistance on the bearing as it passed the “filed” area.

The raw material is 1018 which is pretty hard. My question; is it possible that the raw material expanded during the machining of the cut area? ? ?

Any help or suggestions is appreciated.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Kim

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Re: 1898 Automobile A.K.A. horseless carriage
« Reply #194 on: November 03, 2018, 04:17:17 PM »
I would have just thought that machining that gap for the end of the threads pushed up a little lip on the edge of the rod.  And that's what you would have had to file down.  This is something I've experienced quite often.

How wide was that over sized portion?   If it was very wide at all, then my theory probably isn't right.  I can't say as I've ever experienced a piece of 1018 changing in any significant way from a little machining like that.

Kim