Author Topic: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss  (Read 4076 times)

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2018, 10:57:21 PM »
Wonderful progress Craig. Good to here the effects of Florence are pretty well gone from your area now. We were fortunate and never lost power here.

Bill
« Last Edit: September 25, 2018, 12:45:30 AM by b.lindsey »

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #31 on: September 25, 2018, 12:12:41 AM »
Nice start, and work on the crankshaft Craig. So on the crazy valve set up, I'm guessing that is the way the full sized engine was made?

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #32 on: September 25, 2018, 12:33:05 AM »
I agree Bill.  Looks like the wife's dads house in Wilmington was spared also.  They just opened I40 to get down there today so we need to go see.

Dave- i've never seen the full size but the info page Bob includes with the model infers the model is a fairly accurate reproduction so I'll suspect the valve geometry may be modeled from the full size.
Craig

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #33 on: September 25, 2018, 12:47:42 AM »
He is very fortunate then. The rivers are still rising down towards the coast, a week+ after Florence left. My heart goes out to all of those effected!!

Bill

Offline kvom

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #34 on: September 25, 2018, 12:51:39 AM »
Just caught up on this.  Some nice techniques being shown.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2018, 01:31:20 AM »
I am assuming that the mitre gears which drive the side shaft are a 2:1 ratio, same as on other conventional 4 cycle engines. I will be particularly interested in what the cam on the end of the side shaft looks like.--Brian

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #36 on: September 29, 2018, 10:31:56 PM »
Bill, Kirk, Brian; thanks for the complements.
Brian- yes, the crank to cam ratio is a simple 2:1.  The ignitor trip and valve mechanisms however are unique and interesting.

Moving onward with the crankshaftÖ Now that the center connecting rod journal is formed; it is a simple matter of forming the shafts.  Here Iím about to put the finishing touches on one of the shafts.



After finishing both shafts it was time t cut in the keyways.



And then to moment of truthÖ install in the engine frame and check for binding.



So far Iím pleased; everything goes round and round smoothly.
Craig

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2018, 02:46:12 AM »
I thought I might start on some of the side shaft components. 

This part rides on the side shaft and controls the ignitor.  There were some preliminary steps in the fabrication of this piece that I havenít shown.  They were pretty standard construction.

I envisioned at least two methods to fabricate this part from this point forward.  I decided on this process.  Here Iíve mounted the part (with an arbor Iíll cut away when several steps are complete) in my dividing head and have positioned it in a vertical orientation.  Iím cutting a slot in the top where a spring mounted lever will be inserted to actuate a lever that controls the ignitor.



Hereís a closer few of the slot.



Next three holes are drilled and threaded.  These are used to attach a cap that I have as yet to fabricate.



Next, a large recess is cut into side of the part.  The slice removed has shoulders at a 145 degree angle.



On the other side of the piece, with the dividing head rotated from vertical to horizontal orientation, material is removed so that a 110 degree arc remains from a larger disk section.  I did this by nibbling away the material increment by increment as the piece is rotated a few degrees at a time.



With the arbor now cut off, Iím facing the part to the correct length in the lathe.



The remainder of the disk section, two photos up, has its leading and trailing surfaces feathered.  This was done with some hand filing.




Edit... I made this part in error.  The "disk section" mentioned abovem was feathered incorrectly.  The following photo shows the correct part.


This was an interesting part to fabricate.  Itís use will become apparent as the build progresses.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 09:45:29 PM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #38 on: October 11, 2018, 01:47:11 AM »
Probably time for an update.  I havenít had as much time over the last few days to work on this model; life got in the way again.

Our R/R club had its annual fall run/get together this last weekend.  Probably not immediately appropriate for this thread, but here are a few pictures.
A nice Atlantic class locomotive and consist


My Son, operating Joe Scales USRA Heavy Mikado.  He doesnít like running my locomotive any more, but a light 10-wheeler canít compare to Joeís engine.


Nice to see the kids get in on the action.


Mike Bumgardnerís plantation engine.

 
Gordon Minerís Royal Scott



Joe Scales off on another loop.  I know, everybody on the east coast affiliated with Live Steam Railroading knows Joe.


Gordons consist.


I was pretty lazy this last weekend.  My locomotive never left the round house.  Friday I thought Iíd get it out Saturday; then Saturday it rained, and Sunday was just too bloomíin hot to sit on top of a coal fire.  Iíll need to get it out one of these weekends before the weather turns cold and itís time to put it up for the winter.

On to the Myers.

Once again I was somewhat negligent in providing in-process pictures.  Iíve been concentrating on the gizmo (is that a word?) that actuates the igniter through an additional lever.  This also drives the governor and exhaust valve so itís a good thing to get behind me.

Here I give you a photo of the completed work.  I still need to cut, drill, and thread the side shaft but Iíll need to complete a few more parts so I can spot the hole correctly.



Here I give you an exploded view of the parts.  Some of these were interesting to make.



A close up view of this part


 
This little spring loaded lever is what trips the igniter.  Itís on a spring so if the engine is rotated backwards, it isnít broken off.





The drawings call for a .47 inch diameter washer that rides on this igniter trip that is ĺ in. in diameter.  The washer is .050 in at its thinnest.  There are probably a few ways to fabricate this but I chose to use my rotary milling head.  Iíve shown this tool in other threads but I thought I might show it off here as well.


I had fabricated the part this far; now Iíve attached it using itís mounting hole to a sacrificial arbor.  Iím going to run the milling head around this circle, cutting out the washer.
Starting the operation.



Ending the operation



Finished washer.

« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 03:11:42 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #39 on: October 11, 2018, 08:36:45 AM »
Hello Craig,

Great photos, thanks for sharing.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2018, 10:28:57 PM »
Thanks for your comments Thomas- and all the others silently following along.

Work has progressed on the Myers.  I found myself not taking pictures as I went along, so I decided to give you an exploded view of the new parts to date; and then a few photos of them assembled on the engine frame.  This has been, mostly, fabrication from bar stock, though there were a few brass castings to work with.  I decided to scrap the casting for the governor weight holder.  The casting was of such poor quality that Iím not sure the weight hanger was contained within what I was given.  Making it from bar stock seemed prudent.



Below is a photo from the front of the engine with the ďnewĒ parts assembled to the frame.  I decided to leap ahead a few drawings and fabricate these governor parts now because it seemed to me that a lot of parts needed to line up to these and it would be easier to establish these locations now and then adapt everything else to them.



Same elevation as the above photo but seen from the rear. 



One more photo, peeking up under the governor fly weight cover.

Craig

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2018, 11:10:29 PM »
Missed a few posts Craig, but you are making great progress. The parts look wonderful. Some tricky work there.

Bill

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #42 on: October 26, 2018, 12:05:02 AM »
Iíve been making progress on this model but I havenít been taking photos along the way.  With many models Iíve previously built; after I've fabricated the parts I've been able to assemble the engine with little modifications.  This model has required custom fittings and in some cases, re-fabrication of parts.

Erection of the model is near compete with the piston,  connecting rod, mixer, and plumbing remaining; along with a few as sundry additional parts.

Here you see a photo of the model as it currently sits.



With the model completed to this point, all the exhaust valve, override lockout, and igniter fabrication is complete.  Iím going to use the next few photos to show you how these mechanisms operate.

The model uses a flyweight governor to regulate the engine speed.  Here I give you a peek under the flyweight cover.  The flyweights drive two collars- separated by a fiber washer.  The top collar is carried around with the flyweights, the lower collar is held stationary.  This lower collar bears against a casting with lobes that create a pivot to shift a lock-out bar in and out.




The next few photos will show the exhaust valve operation.  Here the exhaust valve is about to open.  A roller on the exhaust lever is actuated by the cam on the side shaft.




Here the exhaust valve is full open.




Here the exhaust valve has just closed.




The next few photos will show the igniter operation.  The fixture on the front of the side shaft slides forward so that itís tab will contact the igniter lever and actuate the igniter.  The bolt on this fixture holds a cap in place that allows adjustment of the engine timing.   This fixture has a ramp that contacts a ramp on the exhaust lever and pushes the fixture forward on the side shaft.



Here the fixture has been pushed forward and is about to activate the igniter lever.



With the fixture pushed full forward, the tab on the fixture activates the igniter lever.



A view from the front of the engine.  Here the igniter lever has been actuated and the igniter points have closed.




The igniter has just tripped.



A view from the front of the engine; here the igniter lever (hammer) has contacted the anvil and abruptly driven the igniter points open.


In the next three photos, Iíve moved the lockout lever forward so that the exhaust valve is held open .  Here the fixture on the side shaft is in a position to be moved forward as it was when the exhaust was not locked out.  In this case however, the fixture will not be driven forward and the igniter will not be tripped.





Finally I give you a video of all this motion as I rotate the crankshaft.  At the end of the video, I set the lockout, showing how in this case, the igniter is not actuated.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2018, 12:34:50 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #43 on: October 26, 2018, 12:34:07 AM »
You gave made quick progress on this one Craig. I do love the motions of this engine a lot. Can't wait to see it running.

Bill

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #44 on: October 26, 2018, 01:38:16 AM »
I have been wondering for a month now what the business end of the side shaft looked like to operate the exhaust valve. Now I know---thank you for that. To me it looks basically like a cam lobe that you would find on the cam shaft of a conventional four cycle engine. You are doing marvelous work. I may soon want to design/build another engine, and it may well be a side shaft. In fact--If the engine was a normal engine and not a hit and miss, it could probably use two side shafts, one on each side for the exhaust and for the intake.---Maybe----Brian