Author Topic: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss  (Read 4097 times)

Offline Craig DeShong

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Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« on: September 03, 2018, 04:03:37 PM »
I bought this casting set some years ago at Cabin Fever.  I didnít start building it right away and that winter a friend of mine, Gordon Miner, was looking for a project.  He mentioned to me that he was thinking about building this engine, but was bemoaning pay the shipping.  Since I had the kit and wasnít planning on building it in the immediate future I offered it to him.  He built the engine and did a magnificent job; it runs like a sewing machine.  If mine runs as well, Iíll be elated.

Some years passed, and last winter, while at Cabin Fever, I bought the kit AGAIN.  It cost me an additional $10 since the price had gone up (reminder- I need to pump Gordon for the extra $10 :LittleDevil:).

With the Root and Vandervroot finished; I thought it might be fun to get started on this project and see how well along I can take it before the winter sets in.  I canít stand being idle.

This ďkitĒ is prints and castings, offered by Bob Herder of Califon, NJ.  USA.  It models a 1905 Myers ďhit and missĒ engine with side shaft and ignitor.  It builds a beautiful model; and if youíve been to a modeling expo here in the States, youíve undoubtedly seen one.  The full size engine weighed 850 LBS and was a 2 HP engine.  The drawings do not identify the scale of this model but for general size, the flywheels finish to 8 Ĺ in. diameter.

You may remember me stating that I keep my models in my Daughterís vacated room, now that sheís married and moved away on her own.  You may also remember me stating that she left her childhood stuffed animal collection behind.
Therefore, facing this before, it was no surprise that when I entered her room to retrieve the castings was presented with this:



Again, Sirus has been busy with his communications ďacross the pondĒ. :noidea:  Fortunately, I was informed that the current ďcasting fondlingĒ was merely being performed to keep them ďsafeĒ. :ThumbsUp:  (With a little ďspecial coatingĒ appearing on a few of the cast iron pieces Iím not sure how much ďfondlingĒ has been going on :lolb:), but I was happy to be allowed to retrieve them.

Before I start cutting metal, I thought Iíd give you a good view of what is delivered.  With the ďkitĒ you are supplied these castings plus eleven hand drawn prints and several pages of photos of the more intricate parts and assemblies.  I canít see me having problems envisioning how all this goes together because if I do, I just need to drive across town and visit Gordon to inspect his completed model. :ThumbsUp:



First however, a thorough study of the drawings is in order. :happyreader: 
Craig

Offline Jo

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2018, 04:25:45 PM »
Nice set of castings  :)

Do you have any pictures of the finished engine so we know what it will look like?

Again, Sirus has been busy with his communications ďacross the pondĒ. :noidea:  Fortunately, I was informed that the current ďcasting fondlingĒ was merely being performed to keep them ďsafeĒ. :ThumbsUp:  (With a little ďspecial coatingĒ appearing on a few of the cast iron pieces Iím not sure how much ďfondlingĒ has been going on :lolb:), but I was happy to be allowed to retrieve them.

...Ö

First however, a thorough study of the drawings is in order. :happyreader:

You need to do your own casting fondling Craig, complete with the drawings and measuring devices don't let anyone else claim they have done it for you :hellno:


I am aware Surus is busy trying to make friends across the pond as he has tracked down sets of castings for a Wall C-601 4 Cylinder Side Valve and a Wall C-605 30cc single Cylinder engines without drawings: Now he is pestering everyone trying to find the required set of drawings :facepalm:, once he has found them he will expect me to go and acquire the castings for him  ::)

Jo

P.S. Is this the one?

« Last Edit: September 03, 2018, 04:30:27 PM by Jo »
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2018, 05:00:22 PM »
Jo.  Yep, that's the model.  And...  I ALSO do my fair share of 'casting fondling"  :)
Craig

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2018, 06:46:53 PM »
Craig, I have seen one of these and it's a very interesting engine. I especially like the side cam mechanism for the igniter. Looking forward to this one.

Bill

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2018, 04:34:42 PM »
Hi Craig
Nice engine, and its good to see you off onto a new project, I'm looking forward to watching this one take shape.

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2018, 12:11:22 AM »
I started on the base today.  Iíve looked over these castings and I must say that the quality in them is some of the best Iíve had to work with.  If youíve worked with castings for a while you know that sometimes you really have to work to get the intended part from what youíre given.  These castings are not only well cast, but there is ample material provided so that all machined surfaces can be readily attained.

Drawing 1 describes the operations to be performed on the base, might as well start there. 

As you well know, the first step is to get the bottom of the base smooth and even so that the casting will sit flat on the mill table without rocking around.  My method is to shim some good anchor points until it doesnít rock;  then a test indicator will, more or less, show that the bottom is sitting parallel to the mill table.  Then I just run around the surface with an end mill to mill the bottom of the base flat.



While I have the base square and upside-down, I might as well go ahead and drill the mounting lugholes.
 
I always mount these bases on a squared plate.  Iíll be mounting this engine base on angle plates to drill the various holes required and placing the base on a squared plate is a good way to assure that my set-ups will be square and repeatable in the various orientations Iíll require.



Measuring up from the mounting plate the required distance, the crankshaft journal supports are machined.



Then I can bring that measurement forward and mill down the cylinder mounts
 


While I have this measurement set-up, I might as well drill and tap the crankshaft cap journal mounts as well as the cylinder mounts.


With the 80 LB. (pant, pant :'() vice back on the mill Iíve started work on the crankshaft journal caps.  I need to finish these and attach them to the base before I can bore the hole through the journals for the crankshaft.


Iím drilling the cap mount holes.  Iím doing this with the same setup as the milling operation so the holes are square to the milled surfaces.


A good place to stop for today.

Craig

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2018, 12:18:08 AM »
 :popcorn:

I've always enjoyed 'hit and miss' engines. I'm looking forward to this one.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2018, 12:22:38 AM »
Off to a great start Craig. You got a lot done!! Nice to hear the castings are of good quality too. That helps a lot!!

Bill

Offline propforward

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2018, 03:37:57 AM »
Fantastic - what a great and detailed build log. Lots to learn and enjoy here - I will be following along.
Stuart

Offline Jo

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2018, 07:16:39 AM »
Off to a good start  :)

With the 80 LB. (pant, pant :'() vice back on the mill Iíve started work on the crankshaft journal caps.

Did you see my "roller skate"? I Picked up a Motorcycle hydraulic scissor lift table with wheels and have been using that to move my very heavy tooling on and off the mill table e.g. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302827723682. They don't seem to be as available as they were a couple of years ago  :noidea:

Jo
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Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2018, 10:35:50 PM »
Bill, Dave, Zee, Stuart, Jo; thanks for your comments.  Thanks to others that are silently following along.

Jo- I HAVE a hydraulic table :); Iím just to dang stubborn to dig it out and use it :-[.  To date itís not that tough lugging the vice, turn tables, diving heads, etc. around yet butÖ the time is coming when Iíll succumb and dig the hydraulic table out.  Till the Iíll just whine like a three year old while I carry them :lolb:.   

I spent the afternoon in the shop, making black talcum powder :Jester: (while working on this engine).


Here Iím milling the crankshaft journal pockets for the correct crankshaft width and journal width.



Iíve mounted the base on an angle plate and have made the first pass at drilling the crankshaft journals.  Iím merely trying to remove material at this point.  Iíll use a boring bar to get the crankshaft journals ďtrueĒ.



I didnít want to drill these holes too large, lest the drill wander and my boring bar not be able to form true holes.  Here Iím using a thin boring bar; a bit of bending taking place but once again Iím just trying to remove stock.  In the next picture Iíll be sizing the holes to the correct diameter.



With the journal holes at a diameter my long, rigid boring bar can clear, Iím making a final pass.  This should assure me that these two holes are of the correct size and alignment so that the crankshaft should fit nicely with no binding.



Since I have a ĺ inch ream I bored the holes just a few thou. undersize and now Iím using my reamer to establish the correct diameter.  If I didnít have the ream I would have bored them to size but the ream makes it easier to hit the target size of .750 inch.



I usually make split bearings at this point.  The ďkitĒ however came with these oilite bearings; might as well use them.  With the crankshaft journals the correct diameter Iím pinning the oilite bearings to the journal pockets.



Now with the journal caps in place Iíve drilled the oil holes so the crankshaft journal bearings can receive lubrication.

A good place to stop for today.
Craig

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2018, 10:51:30 PM »
Hi Craig,
 Great build log & good progress. Like the setups & the explanation of the whys & hows


Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline crueby

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #12 on: September 06, 2018, 12:37:49 AM »
Very impressive work, great build!
 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2018, 01:07:39 AM »
Another productive day in the shop Craig. Very nice work too.

Bill

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2018, 10:36:31 PM »
Kerrin, Chris, Bill; thanks for your comments.  Thanks also for those silently following alongÖ

Iíll need to set the engine base aside for a while.  I need a long reach drill bit to drill the forward boss on the base for acceptance of the side shaft.  While Iím awaiting delivery, Iíll start on the cylinder.

After studying the drawing for a while I decided to start by milling the mounting flanges.  These need located and milled so that the cylinder bore will be aligned with the center of the crankshaft.


While I have this casting located and mounted in the vice Iím going to plane the sides of these mounts.  This will allow me to accurately re-locate the centerline of the cylinder.


Drilling the cylinder mounting holes.


Iím not really excited about this breakout on the cylinder casting :o.  Iím hoping I have enough material to mill away this break because itís at the rear of the cylinder at a very obvious place.


A little fitting is required for the cylinder casting to fit into the frame receiver.


Here Iím removing the superfluous material so the cylinder casting will set into the base casting.


Here Iím setting up for boring the cylinder.  My boring bar is JUST long enough to do this with one continuous bore. :)

Iím getting a bit of chatter and movement as the boring progresses.  By running the mill in back-gears at a speed of around 60 RPM the chatter has disappeared.  Lighter cuts (under .025 inch) pretty much eliminate the movement.  Fortunately my mill has power down feed, so itís a matter of setting up the cut and walking away for around Ĺ hour till the pass is complete.  It's going to take hours to achieve the 1.5 inch diameter bore, but with the setup I'm using, I'm assured of the bore being aligned with the crankshaft. 
 
Craig

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #15 on: September 07, 2018, 12:16:17 AM »
You work fast Craig.  This build is moving at Crueby speed.  Regarding the long reach drill, if you have the clearance, you can make a simple drill extension from bar stock.

-Bob
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2018, 12:21:53 AM »
Thanks also for those silently following alongÖ

I'm one.  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #17 on: September 10, 2018, 10:22:22 PM »
You work fast Craig.  This build is moving at Crueby speed.
-Bob
Yikes- Donít compare my speed with ChrisÖHe builds Ĺ a steam shovel while I contemplate drilling a hole! :ROFL:

Thanks also for those silently following alongÖ

I'm one.  ;D

Zee- you could never be accused of being silent on this forum  :lolb:

Moving onward with this buildÖ

I was at a bit of a loss on how to mill the top of the cylinder flat (in preparation of receiving the cylinder head).   Iím afraid a boring bar would chatter terribly.  I decided to mill it flat with an end mill, working around the top recess to the size of the head. 
Then I used a boring head and boring bar to make a smooth profile for appearances only, ;leaving a thou or two of clearance from the milled surface. 



Once that was complete it was time to drill these two bosses for receiving the side shaft.  From intuition (and a few horror stories Iíve heard) I knew these two reamed holes needed to be in precise alignment.  I started by using a center drill and then a drill (one size down from 3/8th inch) to drill the rear boss.



With this hole drilled, I fabricated a rod of the same diameter as the hole I had just drilled to hold a center drill, I then used this to center the hole in the forward boss.



I then used a long reach drill to drill the forward boss.



I followed this up by reaming the two bosses with a 3/8th inch ream.



Clearance for the helical gear mounted to the side shaft needs to be milled into this engine base. 



The clearance is more art than science, I just kept removing a bit of material till with a test fit, the gear clears.



The boss on which the ignitor mounts is milled to the proper length.



A few holes are tapped and drilled for mounting the governor.



With the exception of a few holes that need ďspottedĒ, the machining on the engine base is complete.

Craig

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2018, 12:12:00 AM »
You work fast Craig.  This build is moving at Crueby speed.
-Bob
Yikes- Donít compare my speed with ChrisÖHe builds Ĺ a steam shovel while I contemplate drilling a hole! :ROFL:

 :lolb: :lolb:

Chis has help. All he has to do is bake cookies.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2018, 01:06:55 AM »
You work fast Craig.  This build is moving at Crueby speed.
-Bob
Yikes- Donít compare my speed with ChrisÖHe builds Ĺ a steam shovel while I contemplate drilling a hole! :ROFL:
Chis has help. All he has to do is bake cookies.
 :lolb: :lols

Yea, I know.  I baked cookies for MY elves a while back; they tasted them and immediately went on strike.  I guess I'm not much of a baker.  :Lol:

Craig

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2018, 01:15:28 AM »
You work fast Craig.  This build is moving at Crueby speed.
-Bob
Yikes- Donít compare my speed with ChrisÖHe builds Ĺ a steam shovel while I contemplate drilling a hole! :ROFL:
Chis has help. All he has to do is bake cookies.
 :lolb: :lols

Yea, I know.  I baked cookies for MY elves a while back; they tasted them and immediately went on strike.  I guess I'm not much of a baker.  :Lol:

Crud. You and Chris have elves. I'm on my own. That says a lot about the kind of baker I am.  :ROFL: :ROFL:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline crueby

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2018, 01:39:22 AM »
You work fast Craig.  This build is moving at Crueby speed.
-Bob
Yikes- Donít compare my speed with ChrisÖHe builds Ĺ a steam shovel while I contemplate drilling a hole! :ROFL:
Chis has help. All he has to do is bake cookies.
 :lolb: :lols

Yea, I know.  I baked cookies for MY elves a while back; they tasted them and immediately went on strike.  I guess I'm not much of a baker.  :Lol:

Crud. You and Chris have elves. I'm on my own. That says a lot about the kind of baker I am.  :ROFL: :ROFL:


 8)


Chris, the big elf on the end.
 :cheers:

Offline Myrickman

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2018, 12:27:06 AM »
Craig, yup machining the side shaft bearings is a bit of a plaid pincher to be sure. Looks like it turned out just fine. I'll be following along on your journey. Mounting the base on a support plate sure helps with keeping everything square and in alignment. Thanks for the nice build documentation. Paul

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2018, 10:28:24 PM »
Paul, Chris, Zee; thanks for your comments. 

Paul, I was delighted.  After drilling and reaming the two supports for the side shaft, a drill rod slid nicely through the two holes.  The alignment is spot on and I sure am relieved.     

With Florence the hurricane taking a bulls-eye on Raleigh Iíve been working in the shop, wondering if Iíll have a shop next week to play in. :help:

Actually, latest forecasts show the track moving to the south so we here in Raleigh might be spared the worst.  Sure feel for those folks in Wilmington and South Carolina that are in the current track; my thoughts are with you.  May the Lord protect you.

Though Iíve been working on the model, I havenít been taking pictures; I guess my thoughts have been elsewhere.  I did finish the base and cylinder, as well as the head.  Today I made studs and model nuts.



Craig

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2018, 08:12:25 PM »
With only a few power flickers today; I managed to make some progress on the Myers.  I make no excuse for my foul mood in yesterdayís post.  We were expecting a Category 3 hurricane here in Raleigh; that is a hurricane that drops trees on your house and removes the roof. Fortunately, the storm downgraded to a category 1 before making landfall, and the new track has taken it far from us here in central North Carolina.  Lots of storm and folks without power on the coast; many are friends of mine and Iím worried for them, but things could have been much worse.  Thatís the way with these storms, you just have to wait them out and hope for the best.

On to the Myers.

I was working on the valve guides today.  Due to the construction of the head on this engine, the valves are made in parts and then assembled into the head.  Iíll try to remember to take pictures of that when I fabricate the valves, hopefully starting tomorrow.

Here are a few pictures of the machined head, before I pressed the valve guides in place. 

 

The valve guides are made of stainless steel.  Here Iíve started fabrication by turning the valve guide extension.


With the extension sized properly, Iíve cut the part from the stock, turned it around in the lathe, mounted it by the extension I turned above and have faced it and have just finished center drilling in preparation for making the valve chamber.



Here Iím drilling the valve chamber.  All Iím trying to do is just remove stock.



In this photo Iím drilling the valve guide extension in preparation for reaming it to finished size.


Now Iím reaming the valve guide for the 3/16 in. valve stem.


With that finished, Iím finishing the valve chamber to the required size with a boring bar.



For a good press fit into the head, I need to size the outside of this valve guide to .5945 inches.  This will give me a press fit of Ĺ thousandths of an inch.



The last lathe operation on this valve guild is cutting the 45 degree valve lip.  Iím doing this by running the lathe in reverse direction and using the compound to cut the required bevel.



The valve guide needs an opening for the fuel/air mixture to enter the valve chamber, or the exhaust gasses to escape.  Iím doing this on my mill drill.



With the valve guide complete, Iím pressing it into the head with my hand press.  Iím using a piece of plastic to keep from deforming the bottom of the valve guide.  At Ĺ thousandth press fit, this isnít a hard press.   



After finishing both valve guides, here is a picture of the head with both valve guides installed.  Next Iíll be working on the valves.


 
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 08:45:12 PM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2018, 12:46:24 AM »
Feel like I have missed a week of progress Craig. This one is really moving along quickly and looks great. As for the storm, the coast is devastated as are some areas inland like New Bern. It seems to just be camping out in one place. Hope you are spared  the earlier predictions for Raleigh. Still waiting on the rain to start here in the Charlotte area.

Bill

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #26 on: September 17, 2018, 06:17:48 PM »
Florence (the hurricane) didnít leave us completely unscathed; we were without power for around 20 hours over the weekend.  Iím not complaining, things could have been a lot worse.

Getting back in the shop, once things (sort of) got back to normal, work proceeded on the Myers engine.

I commenced work on the valve stems.  These were cut from 3/16th inch stainless steel.  I started by cutting the two shafts to length and facing each end; then center drilling both ends to facilitate threading.  I then mounted the shafts in the lathe and sanded them lightly until the would move smoothly through the valve guides I made in the last post.

Once this was done I threaded the valve cap end.  Though the drawings called for 10-32 threads I have 10-40 tap and die; so I decided to use these slightly finer threads for the valve cap ends, hoping that this might center the valve caps into the stems better than the courser threads.



Once I cut the threads on the lathe, I followed this with the re-threading die to clean up the threads.



Once I finished threading the valve stems for the valve caps I turned to threading the other end of the stems for the valve lifter end.  I uses 10-32 threads on this end as specified in the drawings.



Once again, after cutting the threads on the lathe I followed up by chasing the threads with a re-threading die.  Iíve found that if I support the outboard end of the die with a drill chuck, pressing lightly on the die to keep it centered, I get a straight even thread without the die wobbling and cutting off center threads.



The completed valve stems.


Starting on the valve caps; Iíve chucked a piece of 5/8th dia. stainless and am taking a facing cut.



Now Iím turning the .300 shoulder for mounting to the valve stem.



Rather than part the piece off, Iím sawing it off with my cut-off saw.



Back on the lathe now and turned around Iím facing the top of the valve to the specified thickness.



Center drilling in preparation for the 10-40 threads



Drilling with a .166 inch drill.  I had significant difficulty in threading this piece with this size hole; I ended up going up to a .173 inch drill; still plenty of meat for threading.



Cutting the 10-40 threads with a hand tap.



Iíve mounted the valve cap to the stem, fabricated a 10-40 nut; and am sizing the outside diameter to .600 inches.  My thoughts in following this procedure is that Iíd get a valve edge and seat that were as ďtrueĒ as I could make with a valve fabricated in this way.  The valve must be made this way in order to assemble it inside the cylinder head as youíll see a few pictures down.



Now Iím cutting the valve bevel to 45 degrees.



With valves built in this manner I was expecting that significant lapping would be required for them to seat.  This proved to be the case.  This was a frustrating job.  And a few times some lapping compound found its way to the valve stem and when this happened, everything just seized up and I needed to disassemble, clean everything, and start again.  With patience, the job was completed and the valves seal reasonable well.


Craig

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2018, 10:45:38 PM »
I was hoping to get to the crankshaft next; but the material I ordered hadnít arrived, therefore: on to the flywheels.

Most of you know the drill, but in case notÖ You want to concentrate on getting the inside rim of the flywheel to be as centered as possible.  If the center hub wobbles a little itís not noticeable but if this inside rim isnít centered, the flywheel appears to ďwobbleĒ as it spins.  Iíve placed my test indicator on the inside lip and Iím slowly rotating the flywheel by hand, attempting to find a ďhappy mediumĒ: itís a casting so you wonít get it to run true but you can get it more or less centered.


Iím using my 9 inch Southbend lathe to turn this flywheel.  Iíd love to use the 12 inch Grizzly but the big lathe has a slowest speed of 70 RPM.  It needs to run MUCH slower to use high speed steel tooling with these big flywheels at that speed.  My machinist friends tell me I need to acquire some carbide tooling but till then Iíll use the Southbend that has a slow speed (on back gears) of 35 RPM and I can use my standard tooling at that speed.  It does result in some ďcreativeĒ use of tooling as I push this lathe to its turning diameter limit.


Once I have the diameter to the 8.5 inches as specified in the drawings Iím starting to turn one of the flywheel sides.



Using the same setup, Iím center drilling the flywheel in preparation for machining the shaft mount.



Now Iím drilling the center.  Iím merely trying to remove stock with this operation.



Maybe Iím making this job overly hard; but Iíd like the flywheel mounting hole to be centered.  Therefore, Iím boring the center hole to a few thousandths under the required diameter.



Finishing the center hole with a 5/8th inch ream.



I thought Iíd clean up this inside lip so when the flywheel is painted no wobble can be discerned as the engine runs.



Castings are castings.  This particular casting has this shoulder where material just doesnít exist where it should.  I was hoping that once I faced the side of the flywheel, there would be excess ďmeatĒ to allow me to remove this void.  With the flywheel specified to be .900 inches in width, this isnít going to be possible.  The obvious solution is to reduce the diameter of the flywheel further until the void comes to the surface.  The 8.5 inch diameter is really a ďsuggestionĒ; a diameter .040 inches under isnít going to be a problem let alone noticeable.

 

I tried to turn the flywheel around on the faceplate so I could face the other flywheel side but the hub is too deep for the flywheel to mount flush on the faceplate.   Machining the ďotherĒ flywheel side on the turntable isnít ideal, but it gets the job done.


The last operation is broaching the flywheel keyways.  Here Iím using an 1/8th inch broach and my hand press to accomplish the task.



The completed flywheels.

Craig

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2018, 11:12:31 PM »
Craig--You're doing nice work there. That is a most unusual way to have valves designed, so they have to be assembled in the head. I have never seen that before.---Brian

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2018, 10:45:07 PM »
Brian- I must say this is a first for me too.  Were I to build this engine again, I might think of a way to fabricate the valve and "top shaft" as one part, and the bottom shaft as another: then joining them somehow ???  Just thinking and talking here (which usually gets me into trouble) :headscratch:

Work began on the crankshaft.  Since Iím using A36 hot rolled steel, I first faced the sides of the piece so that I would get an accurate measurement from my test indicator as I aligned the piece.




After centering the crankshaft center as well as the throw center at the ends of the crankshaft, I turned an arbor to hold a crankshaft end for forming the connecting rod journal.



I planned to use my indexing head to form the connecting rod journal.  As I worked the piece, it was rotating in the collet, regardless of how tightly I fastened it.



I switched to using my dividing head and holding the arbor with the 3-jaw chuck.  This resolved the problem.



By rotating the piece and successively milling down I roughed in the journal.  I usually rough in the journals in this manner as it saves time and reduces the requirement to remove massive amounts of material by reaching into the cut with a lathe tool.



Before sizing the journal, I plained the two internal faces of the crankshaft throw as well as its outside edge. 



Now with a flat ground parting tool I sized the journal to within a few thousandths of the target dimension (5/8th inch).  I then finished the diameter with a file.



With the ďnerve wrackingĒ part of this job done, itís on to the simple matter of sizing the shafts, which is a job to start tomorrow.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2018, 01:49:27 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2018, 10:57:21 PM »
Wonderful progress Craig. Good to here the effects of Florence are pretty well gone from your area now. We were fortunate and never lost power here.

Bill
« Last Edit: September 25, 2018, 12:45:30 AM by b.lindsey »

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #31 on: September 25, 2018, 12:12:41 AM »
Nice start, and work on the crankshaft Craig. So on the crazy valve set up, I'm guessing that is the way the full sized engine was made?

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #32 on: September 25, 2018, 12:33:05 AM »
I agree Bill.  Looks like the wife's dads house in Wilmington was spared also.  They just opened I40 to get down there today so we need to go see.

Dave- i've never seen the full size but the info page Bob includes with the model infers the model is a fairly accurate reproduction so I'll suspect the valve geometry may be modeled from the full size.
Craig

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #33 on: September 25, 2018, 12:47:42 AM »
He is very fortunate then. The rivers are still rising down towards the coast, a week+ after Florence left. My heart goes out to all of those effected!!

Bill

Offline kvom

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #34 on: September 25, 2018, 12:51:39 AM »
Just caught up on this.  Some nice techniques being shown.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2018, 01:31:20 AM »
I am assuming that the mitre gears which drive the side shaft are a 2:1 ratio, same as on other conventional 4 cycle engines. I will be particularly interested in what the cam on the end of the side shaft looks like.--Brian

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #36 on: September 29, 2018, 10:31:56 PM »
Bill, Kirk, Brian; thanks for the complements.
Brian- yes, the crank to cam ratio is a simple 2:1.  The ignitor trip and valve mechanisms however are unique and interesting.

Moving onward with the crankshaftÖ Now that the center connecting rod journal is formed; it is a simple matter of forming the shafts.  Here Iím about to put the finishing touches on one of the shafts.



After finishing both shafts it was time t cut in the keyways.



And then to moment of truthÖ install in the engine frame and check for binding.



So far Iím pleased; everything goes round and round smoothly.
Craig

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #37 on: October 05, 2018, 02:46:12 AM »
I thought I might start on some of the side shaft components. 

This part rides on the side shaft and controls the ignitor.  There were some preliminary steps in the fabrication of this piece that I havenít shown.  They were pretty standard construction.

I envisioned at least two methods to fabricate this part from this point forward.  I decided on this process.  Here Iíve mounted the part (with an arbor Iíll cut away when several steps are complete) in my dividing head and have positioned it in a vertical orientation.  Iím cutting a slot in the top where a spring mounted lever will be inserted to actuate a lever that controls the ignitor.



Hereís a closer few of the slot.



Next three holes are drilled and threaded.  These are used to attach a cap that I have as yet to fabricate.



Next, a large recess is cut into side of the part.  The slice removed has shoulders at a 145 degree angle.



On the other side of the piece, with the dividing head rotated from vertical to horizontal orientation, material is removed so that a 110 degree arc remains from a larger disk section.  I did this by nibbling away the material increment by increment as the piece is rotated a few degrees at a time.



With the arbor now cut off, Iím facing the part to the correct length in the lathe.



The remainder of the disk section, two photos up, has its leading and trailing surfaces feathered.  This was done with some hand filing.




Edit... I made this part in error.  The "disk section" mentioned abovem was feathered incorrectly.  The following photo shows the correct part.


This was an interesting part to fabricate.  Itís use will become apparent as the build progresses.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 09:45:29 PM by Craig DeShong »
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Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #38 on: October 11, 2018, 01:47:11 AM »
Probably time for an update.  I havenít had as much time over the last few days to work on this model; life got in the way again.

Our R/R club had its annual fall run/get together this last weekend.  Probably not immediately appropriate for this thread, but here are a few pictures.
A nice Atlantic class locomotive and consist


My Son, operating Joe Scales USRA Heavy Mikado.  He doesnít like running my locomotive any more, but a light 10-wheeler canít compare to Joeís engine.


Nice to see the kids get in on the action.


Mike Bumgardnerís plantation engine.

 
Gordon Minerís Royal Scott



Joe Scales off on another loop.  I know, everybody on the east coast affiliated with Live Steam Railroading knows Joe.


Gordons consist.


I was pretty lazy this last weekend.  My locomotive never left the round house.  Friday I thought Iíd get it out Saturday; then Saturday it rained, and Sunday was just too bloomíin hot to sit on top of a coal fire.  Iíll need to get it out one of these weekends before the weather turns cold and itís time to put it up for the winter.

On to the Myers.

Once again I was somewhat negligent in providing in-process pictures.  Iíve been concentrating on the gizmo (is that a word?) that actuates the igniter through an additional lever.  This also drives the governor and exhaust valve so itís a good thing to get behind me.

Here I give you a photo of the completed work.  I still need to cut, drill, and thread the side shaft but Iíll need to complete a few more parts so I can spot the hole correctly.



Here I give you an exploded view of the parts.  Some of these were interesting to make.



A close up view of this part


 
This little spring loaded lever is what trips the igniter.  Itís on a spring so if the engine is rotated backwards, it isnít broken off.





The drawings call for a .47 inch diameter washer that rides on this igniter trip that is ĺ in. in diameter.  The washer is .050 in at its thinnest.  There are probably a few ways to fabricate this but I chose to use my rotary milling head.  Iíve shown this tool in other threads but I thought I might show it off here as well.


I had fabricated the part this far; now Iíve attached it using itís mounting hole to a sacrificial arbor.  Iím going to run the milling head around this circle, cutting out the washer.
Starting the operation.



Ending the operation



Finished washer.

« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 03:11:42 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #39 on: October 11, 2018, 08:36:45 AM »
Hello Craig,

Great photos, thanks for sharing.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #40 on: October 16, 2018, 10:28:57 PM »
Thanks for your comments Thomas- and all the others silently following along.

Work has progressed on the Myers.  I found myself not taking pictures as I went along, so I decided to give you an exploded view of the new parts to date; and then a few photos of them assembled on the engine frame.  This has been, mostly, fabrication from bar stock, though there were a few brass castings to work with.  I decided to scrap the casting for the governor weight holder.  The casting was of such poor quality that Iím not sure the weight hanger was contained within what I was given.  Making it from bar stock seemed prudent.



Below is a photo from the front of the engine with the ďnewĒ parts assembled to the frame.  I decided to leap ahead a few drawings and fabricate these governor parts now because it seemed to me that a lot of parts needed to line up to these and it would be easier to establish these locations now and then adapt everything else to them.



Same elevation as the above photo but seen from the rear. 



One more photo, peeking up under the governor fly weight cover.

Craig

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #41 on: October 16, 2018, 11:10:29 PM »
Missed a few posts Craig, but you are making great progress. The parts look wonderful. Some tricky work there.

Bill

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #42 on: October 26, 2018, 12:05:02 AM »
Iíve been making progress on this model but I havenít been taking photos along the way.  With many models Iíve previously built; after I've fabricated the parts I've been able to assemble the engine with little modifications.  This model has required custom fittings and in some cases, re-fabrication of parts.

Erection of the model is near compete with the piston,  connecting rod, mixer, and plumbing remaining; along with a few as sundry additional parts.

Here you see a photo of the model as it currently sits.



With the model completed to this point, all the exhaust valve, override lockout, and igniter fabrication is complete.  Iím going to use the next few photos to show you how these mechanisms operate.

The model uses a flyweight governor to regulate the engine speed.  Here I give you a peek under the flyweight cover.  The flyweights drive two collars- separated by a fiber washer.  The top collar is carried around with the flyweights, the lower collar is held stationary.  This lower collar bears against a casting with lobes that create a pivot to shift a lock-out bar in and out.




The next few photos will show the exhaust valve operation.  Here the exhaust valve is about to open.  A roller on the exhaust lever is actuated by the cam on the side shaft.




Here the exhaust valve is full open.




Here the exhaust valve has just closed.




The next few photos will show the igniter operation.  The fixture on the front of the side shaft slides forward so that itís tab will contact the igniter lever and actuate the igniter.  The bolt on this fixture holds a cap in place that allows adjustment of the engine timing.   This fixture has a ramp that contacts a ramp on the exhaust lever and pushes the fixture forward on the side shaft.



Here the fixture has been pushed forward and is about to activate the igniter lever.



With the fixture pushed full forward, the tab on the fixture activates the igniter lever.



A view from the front of the engine.  Here the igniter lever has been actuated and the igniter points have closed.




The igniter has just tripped.



A view from the front of the engine; here the igniter lever (hammer) has contacted the anvil and abruptly driven the igniter points open.


In the next three photos, Iíve moved the lockout lever forward so that the exhaust valve is held open .  Here the fixture on the side shaft is in a position to be moved forward as it was when the exhaust was not locked out.  In this case however, the fixture will not be driven forward and the igniter will not be tripped.





Finally I give you a video of all this motion as I rotate the crankshaft.  At the end of the video, I set the lockout, showing how in this case, the igniter is not actuated.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2018, 12:34:50 AM by Craig DeShong »
Craig

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #43 on: October 26, 2018, 12:34:07 AM »
You gave made quick progress on this one Craig. I do love the motions of this engine a lot. Can't wait to see it running.

Bill

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #44 on: October 26, 2018, 01:38:16 AM »
I have been wondering for a month now what the business end of the side shaft looked like to operate the exhaust valve. Now I know---thank you for that. To me it looks basically like a cam lobe that you would find on the cam shaft of a conventional four cycle engine. You are doing marvelous work. I may soon want to design/build another engine, and it may well be a side shaft. In fact--If the engine was a normal engine and not a hit and miss, it could probably use two side shafts, one on each side for the exhaust and for the intake.---Maybe----Brian

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #45 on: October 26, 2018, 11:03:13 PM »
Nice work Craig, you have been busy.

Dave

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #46 on: October 29, 2018, 11:32:47 PM »
Thanks for all who have made comments; I really appreciate your responses. 

Iíve had a request from a fellow Mem member, asking me to further explain the governor lock-out mechanism.  Rather than just answer him privately, I thought Iíd post my response here incase others are interested.

The engine incorporates a flyweight governor as I showed above.  This is a photo with the flyweight cover off so you can better see the mechanism.  On the top is the weight hanger and directly below is a doughnut shaped part that is pinned to the weight hanger; Iím pointing to it with the pencil.  It is free to move up and down on the shaft but is carried around with the flyweight hanger by the vertical pin that fits loosely in the weight hanger.



Below the indicated doughnut above is a thin fiber washer that acts as a thrust bearing and below it is another doughnut, similar to the one above.  Iím pointing to it with the pencil in this picture.  It has a pin that points down and is trapped in the bell crank casting below to prevent it being carried around with the flyweights.


The fiber washer transitions the rotary motion of the above doughnut to non-rotary motion in the lower doughnut.  I believe this is done so that the lugs of the bell crank do not excessively wear.  Both doughnuts are free to more vertically, and they do as youíll see.  In the following photo Iím pointing to the bell crank, specifically to the bell crank pivot.  As the bell crank rotates, the lockout lever moves in and out,  trapping the exhaust lever and holding the exhaust valve open when it is in the ďoutĒ position.
 


In this photo, were the engine running, the governor is positioned be at low RPM and the spring on the far end of the bell crank holds the two doughnuts up against the governor weights and the lockout bar in the retracted position.

 

In this photo, Iím holding the governor flyweights out as they would be at high RPM.  The flyweights, through the flyweight holder has driven the two doughnuts down the shaft and this has caused the bell crank to rotate and move the lockout bar in the advanced [position where it would hold the exhaust valve open.
   


As you can see, there isn't a lot of movement in this mechanism.
Craig

Offline MJM460

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #47 on: October 30, 2018, 08:58:59 AM »
 Hi Craig, I am one of Iam sure many who wanted to know but hesitated to ask.

Thanks for posting such a clear explanation, it all makes sense at last and I feel I now have a better understanding f of how the fascinating mechanism of the hit and miss actually works.

However, I suspect thre is always a lit of fiddling around to balance the force from tiny flyweights and that return spring at an appropriate speed.

Thank you

MJM460
The more I learn, the more I find that I still have to learn!

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #48 on: October 30, 2018, 02:10:57 PM »
So--the lockbar slips under the tail end of the rocker arm to do it's job.---Right?

Offline Roger B

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #49 on: October 30, 2018, 05:49:10 PM »
Excellent progress and a good explanation of the valve/timing operation  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp: Your local miniature railway group seem to offer the passengers much better seating than I remember from England.
Best regards

Roger

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #50 on: October 31, 2018, 12:36:32 AM »
So--the lockbar slips under the tail end of the rocker arm to do it's job.---Right?
Yup
Craig

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #51 on: November 08, 2018, 08:49:17 PM »
Craig--Maybe I missed it--Did you make those helical miter gears between the crankshaft and sideshaft from scratch or did you buy them?--If you bought them can you tell me where please.---Brian

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #52 on: November 13, 2018, 01:25:45 AM »
Brian, the gears were supplied with the 'KIT'.  They came in packages labeled 'martin', made in USA.  The crankshaft gearcpackage is labeled BS1612-2. The cam gear is labeled BS1624-2.

Btw- i'm making progress on this model... finishing up a bunch of odds-and-ends.  Hope to have it running- sans paint- in a few more days.  When that happens i'll post a video.
Craig

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #53 on: November 13, 2018, 01:38:41 AM »
Yesterday I ordered a set of helical miter gears from ebay, listed as having a 2:1 ratio. They were metal, and didn't cost much, and appeared to be about the right size. Buying from ebay is a lot like buying a "pig in a poke", so I'll know what I have when they get here.---Brian

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #54 on: November 14, 2018, 09:16:07 PM »
Craig--I'm going to drive you a little crazy asking questions. Have you got part numbers and/or tooth-counts for the gears that run your governor?--Something is a little strange. The part numbers you gave me are for bevel straight tooth gears, not helical gears. I checked with martin gear using the part numbers  you gave, and I think perhaps those part numbers were for the governor gears. Do you have any other part numbers?---Please---Brian
« Last Edit: November 15, 2018, 01:20:04 AM by Brian Rupnow »

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #55 on: November 16, 2018, 01:38:29 PM »
Brian.  Life has pulled me away from the forum for a few days.  I had saved the gear packages, thinking some future project  might need gears and I was saving for the Martin name only.  I hadn't come across that name in my past searches for gearing.  I had thought these were the camshaft drive gear packages, guess not, sorry for the confusion it caused.  Looks like you have it sorted out from your other post.
Craig

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #56 on: November 16, 2018, 03:29:45 PM »
Craig--I keep posting questions about your project, then putting on my detective hat and figure them out from all the pictures and videos you have posted. Thank you so much for that.--Brian
« Last Edit: November 16, 2018, 11:47:41 PM by Brian Rupnow »

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #57 on: November 19, 2018, 10:47:04 PM »
Brian- I too usually figure things outÖ after Iíve asked the question.  :-[

Thanks to yíall who have been following along with this build and the interest youíve shown.  Iím about to wrap-up this build; only a few items remaining.

Iíve been busy with non-shop related items over the past week or so; still I managed to get the engine together and running as the video shows.  The engine has a crankshaft pulley, connecting rod oil shield, and tag to be fabricated and attached to the engine as yet before I can call it completely Ďdoneí. 

Along with that is dis-assembly, cleaning, and painting before final assemblyÖ so there are still some items to complete before I can put this model on the shelf and move on to the next project.  :cartwheel:

Craig

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #58 on: November 19, 2018, 10:57:52 PM »
Wow Craig. That looks and sounds great. Seems like you just started on this one and now it's almost done.  What will the color scheme be?

Bill

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #59 on: November 19, 2018, 11:08:06 PM »
That looks great. And the base seems to set it off too.  :ThumbsUp:
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Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2018, 11:10:28 PM »
As Bill says - that was really a quickie  ;)

I'm very impressed with how long it misses between hits  :praise2:

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #61 on: November 19, 2018, 11:56:41 PM »
Very nice Craig!

Dave

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #62 on: November 20, 2018, 12:03:02 AM »
Craig--That is just lovely!!! None of my three previous hit and miss engines I've built will run that slowly or with that many misses between hits. I am greatly impressed.---Brian

Offline Roger B

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #63 on: November 20, 2018, 04:51:42 PM »
Excellent  :praise2:  :praise2:
Best regards

Roger

Offline fumopuc

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2018, 07:50:45 PM »
Hi Craig, a very smooth runner, what a pleasure to watch motion.
Kind Regards
Achim

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #65 on: December 02, 2018, 08:47:26 PM »
Thanks for all your kind comments and also for those of you who have been stopping by to follow my progress.  I've completed the build and have posted a final video here:

http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,8660.msg188960.html#msg188960

Craig

Offline Jo

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #66 on: December 02, 2018, 08:57:05 PM »
So Craig what's next another set of castings :naughty:

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #67 on: December 04, 2018, 07:13:01 PM »
Well Jo, the casting cabinet is bare. :o 

Iím really out of projects unless I drag out the little Lauson I started designing; then building around last year this time.

Weíre about ready to get into the cold weather for a few months, maybe unwise to start a new large project.

However, I have been looking at the ďFrisco StandardĒ, distributed by ďShelf Pet ModelsĒ out of Oregon.  This casting set builds a beautiful two cylinder, igniter fired, open crankcase engine.  I havenít called to check availability of the model but maybe this might be a Christmas present Iíll get for myself. 
Craig

Offline Jo

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #68 on: December 04, 2018, 07:22:30 PM »
Well Jo, the casting cabinet is bare. :o 

How can you live like that  :paranoia:

Imagine not already planning on your next build, or the one after that, or the tenth after  :( As someone once said to me I know I can live for at least 20 years as that is as long as it will take me to make all the engines I currently have - he used to complete a 5" loco in 18 months  ::) and he only had one set left when he passed on to the great workshop in the sky at 98 years young  ;)

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline Craig DeShong

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #69 on: December 05, 2018, 10:13:37 PM »
Well Jo, the casting cabinet is bare. :o 

How can you live like that  :paranoia:

Jo
   :lolb:

Apparently... not for long.  Just ordered the Frisco standard.  Waiting for availability Info.
Craig

Offline Jo

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #70 on: December 06, 2018, 08:16:22 AM »
 :ThumbsUp:

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #71 on: December 06, 2018, 02:48:26 PM »
That should be a great project Craig!!  Will look forward to it.

Bill

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Bob Herder's Meyers side shaft hit and miss
« Reply #72 on: December 06, 2018, 02:52:56 PM »
Hello Craig,

I will be following along, it is a nice looking engine.

Have a great day,
Thomas