Author Topic: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.  (Read 13428 times)

Offline gldavison

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #90 on: June 18, 2019, 01:53:08 AM »
Hi Bob,

I made a 4 flute reamer from the same drill rod the lifters were cut from. Drilled the hole with a #8 drill them reamed with the home made reamer. Lifters fit perfectly. You're coming along. Looks good.

Gary
« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 02:27:23 AM by gldavison »

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #91 on: June 18, 2019, 08:18:08 PM »
Thanks Bill.  I can never thank you enough for your constant support.

Gary, I had considered making a D bit reamer; the thought of making a four flute never crossed my mind.  I recently bought a dividing head.  A fluted reamer might be a nice way to christen it.  How is your build coming?   

-Bob
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Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #92 on: June 26, 2019, 01:01:20 AM »
Block continued-

A fixture plate that allows for angles was setup in the Clausing 8520.  The idea for this fixure came from the Home Shop Machinist website's thread: Shop Made Tools.  The 22 degree angle was set using angle blocks and an indicator.  The fixture was then indicated along X.  The Block was loosely bolted to fixture through the cylinder bores.  The Block was then indicated to the fixture and tightened down.  Toe clamps were pushed up against the side of the Block as a security measure in case the block tried to shift during machining.

The same .250 diameter, .094R endmill was used to finish milling the pockets and the 22 degree sidewall of the block.  As I moved to each pocket, a simple shop made indicator holder was used to indicate the center of each pocket.   This holder clamps to the spindle and allows the tool to remain mounted.  This allowed for the Z axis setting to be left unchanged, which was important to blend the walls and floor of each pocket.  (It wouldn't have made sense to use the Height Setter, to swap one tool and the indicator, back and forth multiple times.)

The bottom of the block is now done.  Next up will be the top and it's details.

-Bob
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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #93 on: June 26, 2019, 01:41:44 AM »
Always love seeing your setups Bob. The block is really coming along.

Bill

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #94 on: November 30, 2019, 05:51:55 PM »
Well, it's been five months since any updates to this build.  I have been able to get in the shop recently and get some machining done.

Block and Top Plate-

Pictures one and two show a fixture plate that I machined for the next sequence of operations to the Block.  There is a .125 radius channel machined the length of the plate.  This allows for two .250 broken end mills to locate the crank bore parallel to the X axis of the mill.  A .0625 reamed hole is located in the center of the channel and allows for the plated to be indicated.  A corresponding dowel pin was inserted into the Block and the Block was located onto the fixture plate with the dowel sitting in the reamed hole. The Top Plate was then placed on the Block and clamped with a simple strap clamp.

George dimensioned the Block features from the Crank centerline in X and the Block centerline in Y .  This fixture allowes for a perfect 0,0 in relation to those centerlines as previously machined.

-Bob
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Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #95 on: November 30, 2019, 06:26:41 PM »
Hello Bob,

Very neat   :popcorn:

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline steamer

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #96 on: November 30, 2019, 06:29:56 PM »
Block continued-

A fixture plate that allows for angles was setup in the Clausing 8520.  The idea for this fixure came from the Home Shop Machinist website's thread: Shop Made Tools.  The 22 degree angle was set using angle blocks and an indicator.  The fixture was then indicated along X.  The Block was loosely bolted to fixture through the cylinder bores.  The Block was then indicated to the fixture and tightened down.  Toe clamps were pushed up against the side of the Block as a security measure in case the block tried to shift during machining.

The same .250 diameter, .094R endmill was used to finish milling the pockets and the 22 degree sidewall of the block.  As I moved to each pocket, a simple shop made indicator holder was used to indicate the center of each pocket.   This holder clamps to the spindle and allows the tool to remain mounted.  This allowed for the Z axis setting to be left unchanged, which was important to blend the walls and floor of each pocket.  (It wouldn't have made sense to use the Height Setter, to swap one tool and the indicator, back and forth multiple times.)

The bottom of the block is now done.  Next up will be the top and it's details.

-Bob

Looks great bob!!!
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Online Dave Otto

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #97 on: December 01, 2019, 01:31:34 AM »
Looks good Bob,
Glad to see you back in the shop!

Dave

Offline gldavison

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #98 on: December 01, 2019, 01:46:47 AM »
Hi Bob

Excellent work.  Glad your back at it.

I have all the parts made but not assembled. I plan to powder coat block and pan before finial assembly. Working on a mounting and then will start on the radiator.

Gary
« Last Edit: December 01, 2019, 01:51:40 AM by gldavison »

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #99 on: December 01, 2019, 02:26:12 AM »
Thank you gentlemen for your support.  Hopefully I can keep moving forward with it. 

Gary I look forward to seeing yours.

-Bob
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Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #100 on: December 08, 2019, 06:39:53 PM »
Block and Top Plate continued-

To make certain that the Top Plate couldn't move, the first four of ten 3-48 holes were drilled and tapped.  Screws were then threaded inserted inorder to clamp the Top Plate.  This allowed for the strap clamp to be removed.  Next, two .0625 dowel pins were located and inserted.  Two of the 3-48 holes required a .125 counter bore.  An endmill was used to accomplish this.  The cylinder bores were then rough bored for locational purposes.

-Bob
« Last Edit: December 08, 2019, 06:47:07 PM by 90LX_Notch »
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Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #101 on: December 09, 2019, 11:24:02 AM »
Nice to see progress Bob  :ThumbsUp:    :cheers:    :popcorn:

Offline Roger B

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #102 on: December 09, 2019, 06:06:24 PM »
Good to see you back on this  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:
Best regards

Roger

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #103 on: December 13, 2019, 01:36:05 AM »
Thanks Admiral_DK.

Thanks Roger.  I've been following along on your two cylinder build.  I don't get to post much these days but, I still try to follow people's builds.


-Bob
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Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #104 on: February 07, 2020, 07:42:13 PM »
Block continued-

The first picture shows the block with the Top Plate removed.  With the Top Plate removed, the next feature to be machined are the pockets that will form the water jackets.

A .500 diameter endmill was used for the initial roughing.  The overall finished depth of the water jackets is 1.040.  The rough depth was to 1.035.

Next a .250 diameter long reach endmill was used.  The water jackets, like the crank web pockets, call for a .094 radius at the bottom.  A .100 ledge was left where needed at a depth of .930. This allowed for the use of a .094 radius .250 diameter endmill to cut the botom radii.

edit- I had some problems with uploading my pictures.  The second picture is the Top Plate removed.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2020, 07:53:25 PM by 90LX_Notch »
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