Author Topic: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.  (Read 9627 times)

Offline gldavison

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #90 on: June 18, 2019, 01:53:08 AM »
Hi Bob,

I made a 4 flute reamer from the same drill rod the lifters were cut from. Drilled the hole with a #8 drill them reamed with the home made reamer. Lifters fit perfectly. You're coming along. Looks good.

Gary
« Last Edit: June 18, 2019, 02:27:23 AM by gldavison »

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #91 on: June 18, 2019, 08:18:08 PM »
Thanks Bill.  I can never thank you enough for your constant support.

Gary, I had considered making a D bit reamer; the thought of making a four flute never crossed my mind.  I recently bought a dividing head.  A fluted reamer might be a nice way to christen it.  How is your build coming?   

-Bob
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http://www.youtube.com/user/Notch90usa/videos

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #92 on: June 26, 2019, 01:01:20 AM »
Block continued-

A fixture plate that allows for angles was setup in the Clausing 8520.  The idea for this fixure came from the Home Shop Machinist website's thread: Shop Made Tools.  The 22 degree angle was set using angle blocks and an indicator.  The fixture was then indicated along X.  The Block was loosely bolted to fixture through the cylinder bores.  The Block was then indicated to the fixture and tightened down.  Toe clamps were pushed up against the side of the Block as a security measure in case the block tried to shift during machining.

The same .250 diameter, .094R endmill was used to finish milling the pockets and the 22 degree sidewall of the block.  As I moved to each pocket, a simple shop made indicator holder was used to indicate the center of each pocket.   This holder clamps to the spindle and allows the tool to remain mounted.  This allowed for the Z axis setting to be left unchanged, which was important to blend the walls and floor of each pocket.  (It wouldn't have made sense to use the Height Setter, to swap one tool and the indicator, back and forth multiple times.)

The bottom of the block is now done.  Next up will be the top and it's details.

-Bob
Proud Member of MEM

My Engine Videos on YouTube-
http://www.youtube.com/user/Notch90usa/videos

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #93 on: June 26, 2019, 01:41:44 AM »
Always love seeing your setups Bob. The block is really coming along.

Bill