Author Topic: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.  (Read 9445 times)

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #75 on: May 07, 2019, 01:46:28 AM »
Block continued-

I did manage to get a small amount of shop time this weekend.  I finished roughing the last pocket and proceeded to finish part of the pocket.  The pocket calls for .125R corners; so a .250 end mill was plunged at the correct locations minus .005 to allow for a finish pass.    A .100 step was left on the bottom of the pocket for a .090R fillet that will be milled next.  The pocket should be .720 and and I am at .719 with gauge blocks.  I can definetely live with that.  If I can hold that for the other three pockets I will be very happy.

-Bob
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Online b.lindsey

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #76 on: May 07, 2019, 01:23:52 PM »
Good to see some progress Bob. Were the gage blocks part of the new acquisition or did you already have them?

Bill

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #77 on: May 07, 2019, 10:01:37 PM »
Bill the gage blocks are part of a set that was included in my recent tool purchase.  They are so nice to have on hand.

-Bob


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Online b.lindsey

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #78 on: May 08, 2019, 02:05:40 PM »
Thanks Bob, I thought they might have been a part of the tooling acquisition. Have always wondered how much I might use a set of those but don't have any currently.

Bill

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #79 on: May 14, 2019, 12:51:38 AM »
Block continued-

I was able to sneak into the shop this Mother's Day and make some progress.  I used the Zero Setter that I made a couple of years ago and swapped in a .250 endmill that has a .094R.  The Zero Setter allowed me to re-establish 0 in Z after changing tools.  The pocket was then finished to the correct depth and the .094R was machined at the bottom of the pocket.  Both the X and Y coordinates  were milled .001 less than in the previous operation so that finished walls were not touched.

The Zero Setter was used and the tools were then changed and the next pocket was milled leaving a .100 step.  This is the first project I have actually used the Zero Setter on and have to say that I am very pleased with it.  I was able to go to my target depth after a tool swap as though the original tool was still in the machine.

-Bob
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Offline ozzie46

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #80 on: May 14, 2019, 01:33:21 PM »
Did you do a build log on the zero setter? I can't seem to find it.

Ron

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #81 on: May 14, 2019, 04:05:23 PM »
Hello Bob,

Some really nice work and the build is looking good.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #82 on: May 15, 2019, 10:58:01 PM »
Ron-
Thanks for looking in.  I didn't post a build thread for it, just a completed project thread.  It is just two pieces besides the indicator.  A body that was machined for the indicator to slip into and a "pad" to fit over the indicator plunger.  If you have any questions or need any clarification do not hesitate to ask.  The only thing that I found from using it, is that if you rezero the Z dial during use; when you zero the indicator before changing tools you must note what the Z dial reads and set the next tool to that reading during the change.
http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,5824.0.html

Thomas-
Thank you very much for the encouraging words and for checking in.

-Bob
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Offline ozzie46

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #83 on: May 16, 2019, 12:47:51 AM »


 Thanks Bob.

Ron

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #84 on: June 08, 2019, 08:18:00 PM »
Last week I was able to finish the pockets as well as the lifter pockets.  Things have been hectic so I was unable to post an update.  Today I began the lifter bores, a pretty straightforward operation.  Well, pooh happens.  Somehow, a .187 endmill cut a .215+ diameter stepped hole.  The required diameter is .203.  As far as I can figure, poor chip evacuation is the cause. 

I believe I can save the block by the use of bushings for the two bores that were machined.

I'll post pictures once I calm down.

-Bob
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Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #85 on: June 08, 2019, 09:51:21 PM »
Commiserations Bob

Been there and done that - or in my case has tried making a hole in a certain diameter and ending up with a very rough one somewhat bigger because of poor chip removal as you said  :facepalm:

Best wishes for the repair

Per

Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #86 on: June 09, 2019, 12:46:54 AM »
Per-

Thanks for the wishes.  I drilled the bores oversize and pressed in some plugs.  I'm going to let the Loctite set overnight and try again tomorrow.


-Bob
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Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #87 on: June 12, 2019, 01:59:48 AM »
Block continued-

The same .250 endmill with .094R was used to finish the crank pockets.  It was also used to mill the lifter pockets.  As noted above the next operation was the lifter bores.  I used a two flute endmill with a high helix that yielded terrible results.  Two plugs were turned and pressed into the bad bores.  The pocket was once again milled. 

For a change of pace, I made a 5/16 diameter boring bar and ground a tool that will be necessary for a future operation on the block.  A test cut on a piece of scrap yielded a positive result.

-Bob

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Offline 90LX_Notch

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #88 on: June 17, 2019, 10:56:38 PM »
Block continued-

The lifter bores were spotted with a .187 diameter endmill.  I am leaving them at that for now because I don't have a .203 diameter reamer. 

The next feature that needed machining were the "windows" that provide oil to the main bearings.  George calls for the use of a .625 diameter Woodruff cutter.  Of course I don't have one, so I made the boring bar and toolbit mentioned above.  The bit was then set for a .625 diameter swing.  Then the fun began.  The tool was side plunged in X axis at the required location.  Then it traveled for .100 in Y axis and was backed out.  The tool was then lowered .030 in Z and the same cut was made as just mentioned.  This sequence was repeated for eight "windows".  For the amount of time that I have in this part, I was scared to death using this homemade setup.  But, it worked.

Next, the cylinder bores for the sleeves were located and bored.   These bores will be used for locational purposes for future machining operations. I ran into a problem with too much chatter from my boring head.  To rectify the problem, I ground a tool and used the 5/16 diameter boring bar directly in the spindle.  I have done this before with excellent results.  The hardest part is setting the tool to swing for the required diameter.

The last operation for this setup was drilling and tapping eleven 0-80 holes that the oil pan will bolt to.  Tapping this small is not difficult with the correct tools.  A spring loaded Fisher Machine Micro Tap Guide was used along with a simple knurled disk tap wrench.  The Tap Guide is reversible with both a pointed tip and a center drilled tip.  This allows for the use of different style taps.  Thanks to Marv for the disk tap wrench idea.  This helps to limit torque and reduce tap breakage.

It was nice to finally remove the Block from the table of the BenchMaster.  It has been setup on there forever.

Onto the next setup.
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Online b.lindsey

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Re: GDB Inline 4 Cylinder OHV I.C.
« Reply #89 on: June 18, 2019, 01:12:37 AM »
Impressive work Bob!! Glad you found some shop time.

Bill