Author Topic: Rods verision of the Lombard  (Read 7073 times)

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #45 on: October 28, 2018, 04:07:51 AM »
Ah, another who is willing to admit his weakness to the siren call of bigger, taller, wider, more power!! :mischief:

As if that was an unusual condition..... :lolb:

Pete@very weak
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline rspringer

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2019, 12:10:54 AM »
After a long absence, I have started doing a little bit of modeling.  Still too hot, plus I canít stand long, to be in the shop for more than a short time.  In the live stream train world there is a saying " build the tender first."  So I decided to build a sled for the Lombard.  This is where the cross buck is connected to the runners. 

Offline crueby

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #47 on: September 24, 2019, 12:19:02 AM »
Hey rod, glad to see you are able to get back to the model!  I'll be up in Maine in two weeks driving theirs, will tell it that it has another little brother in the works.


 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline rspringer

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #48 on: September 24, 2019, 12:40:59 AM »
In the last year I have not just been sitting around.  Well not all of the time anyway.  I acquired an Atlas 6 inch lathe and a Taig lathe.  I bought a 4 jaw self-centering chuck for the Taig.  It drove me crazy.  Look at it wrong and it would be 15 thousand off and then it would be 5 thousand off.  Come to find out it was a Sherline chuck.  The spindles are the same size except Taig is a little longer and the chuck would not seat properly.  Once the problem was found a simple 1/8 collar fixed it right up.  Looking for a mini-mill to put in spare room.  Love to have machines in the house.  You can tell I am single. I can sit at the lathe and actually get something done.  I have been making Square nuts and bolts.  Boy do they take a lot of time to make.  The photo is a 1.25 inch 2-56 bolt started with 1/8 square stock.  Right hand cut tool and a inverted cutoff tool.  First time using an inverted tool on the back of the saddle.  Worked well.  Chris how did you train your elves?  Mine only know how to hide stuff in plain sight. 

Offline crueby

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #49 on: September 24, 2019, 12:45:34 AM »
Training the shop elves is a tricky thing, you need to find thier favorite food (up here chocolate chip cookies) to bribe them with. Keep their beer locked up, or you'll find your socket wrenches threaded on the shop light cords...


I agree about a shop in the house and lathe/mill you can sit at, much easier for long shop sessions.

Offline rspringer

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #50 on: January 13, 2020, 08:59:10 PM »
The Lombard has been on hold for an indefinite period Of time. I just can't get in the shop and do stuff like I used to be able to. So I decided to build a couple of sleds for the Lombard. Call me crazy but I decided I wanted square head Nuts and Bolts. I proceeded to make them thought it would be fun.  After using up 30 ft of 3/16 Square stock I still am not finished. I'm afraid to count how many there are in this thing. The bolts are 5-40. 

Offline crueby

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #51 on: January 13, 2020, 09:16:35 PM »
30 feet?  Sounds like a full-size sled! Wow.

Offline rspringer

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #52 on: January 13, 2020, 09:37:16 PM »
This is one of the runners.   It will make quite a wall hanging.

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #53 on: January 15, 2020, 06:52:06 PM »
I thought the runners had a forged wear plate on them, or are those yet to be installed?

If you're interested, there's a guy in Montana that's been building a horse-drawn bobsled for the past 4 or 5 weeks. (He's just about done with it.) https://www.youtube.com/user/EngelsCoachShop  His bobsled won't be too much smaller than the lumber sleds were.

If the lumber sleds were built like his bobsled is, most of the bolts will be carriage head bolts instead of square head.  But then again, you're building it, it's YOUR wagon shop and you can use whatever bolts you want to build your sleds.  Our thoughts and opinions REALLY don't matter, YOU are the only one that has to be satisfied with your work.

Don

« Last Edit: January 15, 2020, 07:11:37 PM by ddmckee54 »

Offline crueby

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #54 on: January 15, 2020, 08:16:16 PM »
Rod already has these (and more) pictures I took of the sled up at the logging museum in Maine, but I am posting these for everyone elses reference. This one was built with new timber but with sets of original Lombard hardware that they had (they have built several of these from original ironwork). They do have square head bolts/nuts.









The sleds were made to run on roads that had been iced and grooved so the slots would help the sleds 'track' well. They would typically run logs during the day, then go back with special horse drawn sleds to water/groove as needed at night. Downhill stretches would get straw scattered on them to help slow things down and prevent runaway trains, the Lombard steamers had no brakes (things would jackknife with them anyway). Pairs of the sleds would gget stacked with logs, and then formed up into long trains to be pulled by the Lombards. Many tons per train!






Offline rspringer

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #55 on: January 15, 2020, 08:41:45 PM »
Well Chris you are quick on the draw.  I was just looking those pictures up. 

Don thanks for the comments.  I am building from a blueprint from the 1920s.  I does call for some countersunk bolts.  Mostly where sliding surfaces meet.  I have made Several of those also.  Part of the ideal of making the bolts and all of the rest of those things was for therapy.  Been a rough 2 years.  They give me something to do, are not critical in size, and I don't mind the same thing over and over.  It will have 2 sets of shoes.  One will be as wide as the runner and the other will be about half of that.  I do love to watch Engels Coach Shop.  Every Friday.  I did find out that the countersunk bolts that hold the shoes in place are called Shoe Bolts.  I settled on 3/16 square (1.125 scale), 1/8 (.75 scale ) would probable been closer to correct but I like the beefiness they give.  I have a box of miscellaneous parts that I have been SLOWELY making. 
 
Everyone else thanks for the encouragement.  Helps keep me away from the TV.   

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #56 on: January 15, 2020, 09:14:22 PM »
The square head bolts would have saved time over using the carriage bolts on the irons.  They wouldn't require you to heat the iron and drift a square hole in it.  You could just drill a round hole.

If you had to hand-forge the bolts out of round stock, a square head would probably also be easier to forge than a carriage head.

Like I said, it's up to the wagon shop owner.

Don

Offline rspringer

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #57 on: January 19, 2020, 11:57:14 PM »
Quick question, what is a relatively easy way to make a 3/16 square nut driver. 

Offline crueby

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #58 on: January 20, 2020, 12:25:55 AM »
Couple ways I can think of.

For a clock winder, I needed a square driver once - equivelant to that would be to drill small holes at the corners, then one large 3/16" hole in the center, connect/even out sides with a rotary tool bur. The corner holes are center on or just inside the points, so the corner of the nut wont hit.


For the Kozo New Shay, he shows milling a channel in the side of some square stock to form a U, then silver solder a strip on the fourth side to close it in.

EDIT: Another thought - check your automotive socket sets, if you have 12-point ones, see if one will fit the square nuts.

Offline Jo

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Re: Rods verision of the Lombard
« Reply #59 on: January 20, 2020, 07:28:23 AM »
For a 3/16 sq nut you should be able to get away with a No 10 clock key  ;)

Jo
Enjoyment is more important than achievement.