Author Topic: Zee Needs Popcorn  (Read 27412 times)

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #225 on: July 26, 2018, 04:18:43 PM »
Thanks Kim. That's interesting and helpful.

I'd be interested in what other people think too.
Given the advantages, why wouldn't forming taps be the go to taps?
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
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Online Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #226 on: July 26, 2018, 04:39:56 PM »
I think it’s kinda moving that way Zee.

Cletus

Online Jasonb

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #227 on: July 26, 2018, 04:44:38 PM »

Given the advantages, why wouldn't forming taps be the go to taps?

The first line of the MSC guide says why. You need a material that will deform when the tap is used so a ductile metal is what they work best on. No good for cast iron for example. So people buy standard taps that will work in all metals first and then may add other types later on.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #228 on: July 30, 2018, 11:04:32 PM »
Shutting down the shop for a while. I need to re-arrange it so I have better control over the swarf (or rather the 'people' that visit my shop).
Besides re-arranging...it's way over time to do some adjusting of the machines. They are close but not close enough.
One thing that bothers me is a clacking noise coming from the mill. It didn't used to be there. In fact, it used to be hard to hear the mill was running. No longer.

In the meantime...a few questions...

Given forming taps don't produce swarf...what are the thoughts on tapping under power?

I had some questions on another thread that no one addressed. I don't mean to express any dissatisfaction...I think my post got buried.

On the mill, I have two locks per axis (except the quill)...

1) Is it sufficient to lock just one down? I ask because sometimes the other lock is hard to get at.
2) How hard is too hard? I've had problems not locking hard enough but I fear I'm damaging the gibs. Thoughts?
3) I'd like a different solution for the locks on the Y axis. They are hinged type...pretty loose...and often either dig into the base or hit a bolt that attaches the base to the table. I try to set them (when loose) so they are are 90 to the table...but vibration will cause them to turn a bit and then fall down.

Similar questions on the lathe when it comes to the compound or cross slide. One screw for locking?

Very newbie questions...but regardless whether you think I am or not (and I am...still)...there are many out there who are.
All I ever see on the net or the forum are references to 'lock the axis down' but not very much information on how or how much.

Thanks.

It's too bad I can't get a job as a newbie at my age. Just a part time job would do. It might take off that feeling that I should be doing something useful.
Problem is...I promised myself that retirement meant "Not having to be at any particular place at any particular time.".

Methinks I've screwed myself.  :lolb:
A very common occurrence.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #229 on: July 30, 2018, 11:35:21 PM »
Zee--Can't say much about tapping under power. 99% of the taps I use are 3/16" and under, and I wouldn't dream of using them "under power". As for locks on the X and Y axis, I generally lock only one. You can't lock them too hard as long as you aren't using a wrench. Check out the locks and see if they are the type which can be pushed in by hand to disengage them from the threaded portion and turned to whatever angle you want them to be at. Lots of mills have that function and people aren't aware of it. On compound and cross slide, yes, only one lock for locking them. You won't damage the gibs. As for the clacking noise--Could be a damaged gear tooth, could be a spindle bearing, could be damned near anything.---Brian

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #230 on: July 30, 2018, 11:45:16 PM »
Thanks Brian!
The locks you describe are the ones on the X and Z and like you say...can be pulled back and put in whatever angle will keep them out of the way.
Not so for the Y...it seems.
As for the mill...I'm hoping it's something that got in the gear/belt train. Perhaps a piece of that 3D printed spindle stop (that I keep forgetting about and turning on the mill anyway). Otherwise...I'm hoping for a gear rather than a bearing.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #231 on: July 30, 2018, 11:48:57 PM »
x and y are horizontal. z axis is vertical.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #232 on: July 31, 2018, 12:08:21 AM »
x and y are horizontal. z axis is vertical.

Yes, I know. It may be I miss-spoke.

Attached picture are the Y locks that I'm talking about.
You can see what I mean by 'hinged'.
You can barely see the 2nd one further back.

You can also see that nice scrape near the bolt where the lock handle was digging in.
That happens, or it collides with the bolt, when I release the lock and move in Y.
It's all loose, so even if I try to set the handle at 180 to the table...it can move and slip down into the base or bolt.

I either need to know how to do this so that collisions don't happen, or install a different lock handle where this is mitigated.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #233 on: July 31, 2018, 12:18:22 AM »
Okay--I gotcha, and see what you mean. The locks on my x and y axis aren't hinged, so they don't flop like yours do. At BusyBee tools where I bought my lathe and mill, they have two or three different styles of lock handle. If you bought your mill from one of the places that stocks mills and lathes it might be worth going there and having a look at what other styles of lock handles they have. Just be aware--they will be a metric thread if your mill is from "off-shore".

Online Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #234 on: July 31, 2018, 12:22:50 AM »
I can see where that would be problematic, especially when milling in the Y axis. Might could swap them out for the ones like on the other two :shrug:. It actually doesn’t do much harm to leave them just “just lightly nipped up”; i.e. just when you feel contact without tightening.

Whiskey

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #235 on: July 31, 2018, 01:23:17 AM »
It actually doesn’t do much harm to leave them just “just lightly nipped up”; i.e. just when you feel contact without tightening.

That may be the answer. I had always worried about wear but maybe not so much an issue. Thanks.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #236 on: July 31, 2018, 01:50:31 AM »
Take 'em out, smack 'em with a hammer to squeeze the fork tighter on the blade enough that they'll stay where you put 'em.
Or take 'em apart, mill the slot a bit wider and reassemble with a wave washer.

Pete
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #237 on: July 31, 2018, 02:06:18 AM »
Take 'em out, smack 'em with a hammer to squeeze the fork tighter on the blade enough that they'll stay where you put 'em.
Or take 'em apart, mill the slot a bit wider and reassemble with a wave washer.

Also an interesting idea. Thanks Pete.

But I am wondering if anyone else has these type of locks.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Art K

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #238 on: July 31, 2018, 02:12:07 AM »
Carl,
If the fold over gib tightening screws are a problem you could probably replace them with a normal SHCS. Then you just need a handy allen wrench. My wife suggested a pair of $1 flip flops that the grand children must put on to enter. Sell it to them as safety, then move on to safety glasses.
Art
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Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #239 on: July 31, 2018, 02:29:01 AM »
My wife suggested a pair of $1 flip flops that the grand children must put on to enter. Sell it to them as safety, then move on to safety glasses.

Interestingly, the grandchild knows not to enter without shoes. It's the grown-ups I have to worry about.

Probably because grown-ups think they know everything. Ha!

P.S. If grand-child comes in to watch a machining operation...she gets a full face mask.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.