Author Topic: Zee Needs Popcorn  (Read 17639 times)

Offline gerritv

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 471
  • St Catharines, ON
    • Gerrit's Hobbies
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #30 on: June 01, 2018, 01:13:44 AM »
I was expecting the 'V' on the way to be 90 degrees. But I'm measuring more like 87-ish degrees.

I thought my King KC1022ML was the only one like that, seems to be part of the general design. I ignored the difference, but didn't make the overall width large enough. That let the unit rotate slightly when the end stop was reached (just pressure was enough). So make it wider would be my suggestion.
It would of course be best to get the angle correct but it is a bit of a puzzle how to do that (from my recollection).

I am about to get a Ammco shaper so the angle should no longer be an issue re: milling :-)
Don't confuse activity with progress

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6263
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #31 on: June 01, 2018, 01:25:42 AM »
Thanks guys.

@gerritv: The drawing is an older version. The width is 1" rather than 3/4".

Okay okay. I'll come clean. I didn't have any 3/4" stock by 1.5". I have 1" by 1.5". So I thought...why mill away all that material?  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline gerritv

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 471
  • St Catharines, ON
    • Gerrit's Hobbies
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #32 on: June 01, 2018, 01:58:27 AM »
less effort is always a good choice, fewer things to go wrong.
Don't confuse activity with progress

Offline 10KPete

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1375
  • Nordland, WA, USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #33 on: June 01, 2018, 02:34:04 AM »
And you then have a larger chunk to use for something else when you botch that one....

Re: the odd angle. It's surprising how close you can mill to a scribed line.. I would make clean marks in blue and then mill to those. I'd be surprised if you were more than a half degree off.. And a couple of swipes with a file gets your perfect fit.

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline mklotz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2375
  • LA, CA, USA
    • SOFTWARE FOR PEOPLE WHO BUILD THINGS!
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #34 on: June 01, 2018, 03:09:54 PM »
Karl,

Next time you're lusting to buy yourself a tool present, get a set of these...

https://www.amazon.com/AccusizeTools-Pcs-Angle-Gauge-EG02-5050/dp/B00RZQT2P6/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1527861795&sr=8-9&keywords=angle+gauges

It's surprising how often I've had occasion to use mine.  Their major advantage is that they get into locations where my protractor head simply won't fit.
---
Regards, Marv


Home Shop Freeware
http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3617
  • Springfield, Tennessee. USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #35 on: June 01, 2018, 06:46:28 PM »
+1 on Marvís suggestion, and if you arenít into putting a DRO on the lathe just yet, look into magnetic backed indicators; they are skookum  :popcorn: :ThumbsUp:

Cletus

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6263
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #36 on: June 01, 2018, 07:08:29 PM »
Hi Marv. Seems I've bought several 'used once' tools. I'm trying to control myself and see that a desirable tool will/can be used a few times before I buy it.
But it goes on the list of ideas for my kids when they ask what they can get me.

In the meantime, I'm printing my drawing to scale and using it as a template. Useful in that, in an earlier version, I saw the rod was placed such that it went between two blocks under the carriage rather than against them or the carriage.

@Cletus. "skookum"...I had to look that one up. You have roots in the Pacific Northwest?

@Pete. That be the plan.  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3617
  • Springfield, Tennessee. USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #37 on: June 01, 2018, 09:00:28 PM »
No connection other than a camper, alder smoked fish, some locally grown herbs ( 8)) Joni Mitchell and James Taylor  :Jester:

Cletus

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6263
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2018, 11:06:20 PM »
I got the carriage lathe stop done.

This was important for me as I've been somewhat 'down' for a couple of weeks and it was good to accomplish something.
I'd like to say it took all day (which it did) but that was for the 2nd attempt.

The 1st attempt failed due to the usual not listening to the inner voice that always asks "are you sure about that?"
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline mklotz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2375
  • LA, CA, USA
    • SOFTWARE FOR PEOPLE WHO BUILD THINGS!
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2018, 11:34:59 PM »
I can't tell from the photo.  Does it incorporate a "save the DI plunger" feature?  If the carriage is driven all the way into the stop, will it force the DI probe beyond its limit?

If it doesn't you may want to add a stud that the carriage contacts before the DI probe is pushed too far.
---
Regards, Marv


Home Shop Freeware
http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3617
  • Springfield, Tennessee. USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2018, 11:44:13 PM »
Youíll love it Zee. I use a mag-back on the Monarch and it works really well.

Cletus

Offline Brian Rupnow

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4383
  • Barrie, Ontario Canada
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #41 on: June 03, 2018, 11:44:50 PM »
Carl---Here's some food for thought. Do you intend to operate the power longitudinal feed on your lathe? If you do, and don't disengage it before the carriage runs into your stop, something expensive is going to break. I was very concerned with that happening on my new lathe, so I designed and made a carriage stop similar to yours, but incorporated a couple of small die springs in the clamping bolts. Now when I position the stop and lock it down, I can feel when my carriage touches it under manual feed. There is a very definite and well defined "Stop". However, the clamp mechanism isn't bottomed out--the resistance I feel when locking it into position is probably about 3/4 compression of the die springs. If (and it's sure to happen sooner or later) I don't disengage the auto feed exactly when I should, the carriage will just move the carriage stop along ahead of it without breaking anything. Once you've turned a shoulder on the piece you are working on in the lathe, the point becomes rather moot, because even if the carriage stop will move, you will run the tool into the shoulder and break something anyways.--Unless your carriage driveshaft has a slip clutch on it.

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6263
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #42 on: June 04, 2018, 01:08:40 AM »
@Marv...Funny you mention that. I had noticed that by going to a 1" wide stop, the plunger can be fully depressed without issue.

@Cletus...Thanks.

@Brian...I have no plans to use this when operating with powered longitudinal feed. That's not to say I won't boo-boo but I suspect the stop will move before something breaks. The stop is sufficient for me to feel I manually came to it...but shouldn't be enough to actually stop the carriage if I force it.

One other note about Marv's post...it may be hard to tell...under the dial indicator is a 3/8" rod that is actually the stop. The rod stop and indicator were set so that the indicator would be facing up (about 45 degrees) so I can read it without bending.  The stop can be variably set and locked with a socket head. The dial indicator is similarly locked with a socket head but not for adjusting...just for locking in place.

Attached is my drawing. It's probably not up to date...and certainly not to drafting standards...but it should give you an idea. Not shown is the bit that clamps the stop to the lathe way.

Some of the milling was down by taking the part...trying it on the lathe...then doing more milling.
I don't know if I mentioned, but I should...I got the idea from a youtube post. My version is very similar but I didn't need to mill out an angle for the dial indicator. In the youtube version, the stop rod is offset in two axes whereas mine is offset only in one.

Oops. I just double-checked what Marv was asking about. No..it doesn't depress fully into the body. I might have been using a different dial indicator that did.
No matter.

[EDIT] The drawing is definitely wrong. I did have to shave some more off the bottom in order to clamp. And the 'V' was pretty much done 'free-hand'.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline zeeprogrammer

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6263
  • West Chester, PA, USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #43 on: June 04, 2018, 01:31:44 AM »
P.S. I can protect the dial indicator plunger by not having it stick out too far.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3617
  • Springfield, Tennessee. USA
Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #44 on: June 04, 2018, 01:56:28 AM »
Zee, I really donít think you have anything to worry about. Anyone who is operating a lathe in a conscientious manner will disengage the power feed just before it touches the indicator stem and will hand feed to their set point. I really couldnít image even a half assed machinist power feeding alway to the stop or forgetting to disengage  :shrug:. Guess I just pay way too much attention to what Iím doing.

Cletus