Author Topic: Zee Needs Popcorn  (Read 28672 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #270 on: August 15, 2018, 06:04:49 PM »
Not easy parts to make Zee and they look ok to me.  If you don't have one, $50 buys you a one inch belt sander at Harbor Freight, the perfect tool to blend rough edges and smooth contours.  I'd be lost without mine.
Absolutely - mine gets a lot of use, from knocking off rough edges to rounding ends to non-critical arcs.

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #271 on: August 15, 2018, 06:19:03 PM »
I have a 1" stationary belt sander. I have a 4" stationary belt sander. I have a 3" hand held belt sander. I have a 5" dia. air sander. I have a hand held 1/2" wide belt sander. I have an electric jitterbug sander.---and about two dozen files---and an old Eastwood polishing kit.  On anything I think is "worthy" at all, then at least one or two of the sanders and files get used, and sometimes the Eastwood polishing kit.

Offline crueby

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #272 on: August 15, 2018, 07:08:33 PM »
These guys have great sanding belts/sheets/tools/etc - I love the resin-bonded cloth backed sheets.
https://www.woodworkingshop.com/

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #273 on: August 15, 2018, 08:21:56 PM »
Just trying to catch up dude  8). Zee, you are carving some pretty intricate parts there. And, you nor I, have been doing this as long as many here have been. I donít ever count how many times I try to make a part ; I try to learn from each screwup on each part; then finally arrive at the finished part with an increased amount of knowledge and confidence. I think you are doing a cracking good job 👍. Now just keep the damn swarf outta the pool  :lolb: :lolb:

Eric

Offline jonesie

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #274 on: August 18, 2018, 02:20:27 PM »
hi zee been watching your build and Whiskeys build of this engine. i build this one right atfer stew finsihed his and he sent me the  plans. really a fun build and a great runner need to add the whistle and gov. yet. you are doing a great job,it was easy for me as i have been a moldmaker -toolmaker for over 45 years building lots of plastic injection molds. my one advise is just take you time and think each step  thur  before you do it and you will save lots of time not getting into a corner. after 45 years i still get challenged. kepp up the good work and you will have a nice runner when you are done.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #275 on: August 18, 2018, 06:51:10 PM »
Thanks everyone. Very much appreciated.

I do have a belt and disc sander combo. I think that will do for some areas of the parts.

What may be more helpful is one of those gizmos that take a file and moves it up and down.
As I recall, you can even drive it from a lathe or motorize it.

A few members talked about that some time ago and showed projects.

I think that's something I want to do.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline mklotz

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #276 on: August 18, 2018, 08:43:59 PM »

What may be more helpful is one of those gizmos that take a file and moves it up and down.
As I recall, you can even drive it from a lathe or motorize it.

A few members talked about that some time ago and showed projects.

I think that's something I want to do.

The "gizmo" (well, at least you didn't call it a thingy) you're referring to is called a die filer.  The thread, which includes contributions from others, is here...

http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,1800.msg26667.html#msg26667
« Last Edit: August 18, 2018, 10:38:00 PM by mklotz »
---
Regards, Marv


Home Shop Freeware
http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #277 on: August 18, 2018, 09:34:20 PM »
Thanks Marv! That's the very thing....e.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #278 on: August 19, 2018, 05:39:59 PM »
For working on the crosshead guide, a fixed follower is needed.
I've used one once back when I had a mini-lathe.

On first go, fairly deep grooves were cutting into the stock. Pretty ugly.
I did some very light filing on the holders (not sure that's 'allowed') and things improved tremendously.
However, there is still a pretty good groove on one side.

Am I going about this right? More filing until I get a somewhat smooth mark?
Other suggestions to improve this?

I should expect some marking since I'm turning aluminum and I believe the holders(?) are harder.
I supposed too that facing/drilling pushes the part harder against one or two of the holders and would deepen the markings.
(In fact, I think that's what happened. I first ran the lathe to see if the marking had improved, which it had, then faced/drilled and saw the marking degrade.)

I'm just not sure what to expect.

BTW The general process is:
1) Set fixed steady
2) Face/center drill
3) Remove fixed steady and use live center to bring OD to diameter
4) Set fixed steady and drill/bore

It's this last step that worries me. Seems the finish will be ruined.
Granted, the OD is not critical and I can sand to smoothness...but still, I'd like to minimize the damage.

Thanks
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #279 on: August 20, 2018, 12:00:13 AM »
pictures would help....
I assume you mean the kind of steady rest with bars holding the work from three sides, the rest attached to the bed rails of the lathe?  Did you try some grease on them to help the digging-in? I've only used them on brass and steel, the rest did leave a rub mark on the part, can see how it might dig in more on aluminum. Any way you could make a bushing ring to glue onto the part, have the rest rub on that?

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #280 on: August 20, 2018, 12:13:44 AM »
pictures would help....
I assume you mean the kind of steady rest with bars holding the work from three sides, the rest attached to the bed rails of the lathe?  Did you try some grease on them to help the digging-in? I've only used them on brass and steel, the rest did leave a rub mark on the part, can see how it might dig in more on aluminum. Any way you could make a bushing ring to glue onto the part, have the rest rub on that?


Thanks Chris.

Yes...the traditional steady rest with work held from 3 sides and the steady rest attached to the rails of the lathe.
I didn't try grease...I used WD-40, given it was aluminum I was holding (as I understand it).

I'm not sure what you mean by a 'bushing ring to glue onto the part'.

In any case...as it turned out...when I reversed the part to drill and bore...it seemed there wasn't a lot sticking out that I had to worry about with a steady.
So I went ahead.

I got the 3 bores I needed done. Next step is the mill.

Sorry for no pics. I'll have them soon.

Quite frankly...so far so good on the crosshead guide.
Which probably means I've jinxed myself.  ;D

Going back to the steady rest with the 3 sides...I'm still curious as to what people have done to improve/fix them. I can't believe they are 'good' out of the box and need some "polishing". I'm curious to know what 'improvements' people have done to their rests.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #281 on: August 20, 2018, 12:20:24 AM »
Sounds like you have it somewhat sorted. I donít think I have ever used mine, so, Iím not much help anyway. Hmmm, taking after Steamer eh? :stickpoke:.

Eric

Offline crueby

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #282 on: August 20, 2018, 12:21:20 AM »
I meant to make a brass or steel ring that would slip over the aluminum part where the steady was rubbing on it, and temporarily glue that ring in place on the part. That way the steady arms would run on the ring rather than the finished part.Grease does help, stays in place better than oil or wd40.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #283 on: August 20, 2018, 01:19:01 AM »
There are two types of steady rest fingers. Fixed and rolling. Rollers sound good but in practice they seem to mash little chips in to soft work. And if on hard work the little chip can bust the steady rest! Seen it done by me.

Fixed come in two flavors. Hardened and polished (usually steel) and 'stock' materials. The ones in my steady are round brass that are flat on the end. Well, they're a little hollow from years of use. Brass will run on almost any material provided it's smooth. I use either oil or grease depending on the speed. Oil for most stuff. I just use the ISO 68 oil that's used on the gearbox.

Biggest thing is clean and smooth surface.

Keep it goin' guys, ya'll are doin' thangs I wish I could.

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Zee Needs Popcorn
« Reply #284 on: August 20, 2018, 01:31:52 AM »
Eric you and I think a like, that was the first thing that popped into my head when I read that; sorry Dave. :lolb:

Zee use heavy oil on your steady rest fingers not grease, something like Vactra #2 or maybe some cutting oil applied often, this works for me but I'm sure others may have different methods.  Yes as indicated above it is going to leave a mark. Also try to keep the chips away from the fingers.

Dave