Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 48511 times)

Offline Larry Sw

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #870 on: December 07, 2018, 09:06:46 PM »
I've worked on some pretty old machines back in the day.  Babbit bearings and all.
But never on any table saw design quite that early.  1920's was probably the earliest.
A 16" Sliding Table Tannewitz was a very accurate saw if you wore ear muffs to cut
the blade whistle. It was loud. The carbide teeth were about 3/16" thick    :Lol: 
It was a very good compound miter machine with a large
miter gage and accurate engraved degree markings on the sliding table.  Very good
for accurate compound miter cuts.
That design doesn't seem to take cutting sheet goods into account with the overhead
drive belts in the way long cuts.  BTW  never worked in an actual lineshaft shop.
Just on lineshaft machines converted to electric motor drive.  Like Chain Mortisers and Single
End Tenoner, 8" Jointer etc.  Babbit bearings.

Larry S

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #871 on: December 07, 2018, 09:20:40 PM »
Hi Larry,
Thanks for sharing that informative information. Yes, the advent of motors mush have been emancipating for the use and placement of equipment on the floor of the shop,
Otherwise there were many restrictions as you have mentioned.

Here is a shot showng what I was talking about with the underside of the saw table.

The photos show that the belt just clears the right side of the table.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #872 on: December 09, 2018, 01:59:58 AM »
The finished table mounted on its trunnions with the saw opening machined.


Offline 10KPete

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #873 on: December 09, 2018, 03:38:10 AM »
 :cartwheel:
 :popcorn: :ThumbsUp:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline steamer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #874 on: December 09, 2018, 11:25:50 AM »
I've worked on some pretty old machines back in the day.  Babbit bearings and all.
But never on any table saw design quite that early.  1920's was probably the earliest.
A 16" Sliding Table Tannewitz was a very accurate saw if you wore ear muffs to cut
the blade whistle. It was loud. The carbide teeth were about 3/16" thick    :Lol: 
It was a very good compound miter machine with a large
miter gage and accurate engraved degree markings on the sliding table.  Very good
for accurate compound miter cuts.
That design doesn't seem to take cutting sheet goods into account with the overhead
drive belts in the way long cuts.  BTW  never worked in an actual lineshaft shop.
Just on lineshaft machines converted to electric motor drive.  Like Chain Mortisers and Single
End Tenoner, 8" Jointer etc.  Babbit bearings.

Larry S

True, but I don't know how much in the way of sheet goods existed when shops were still "Line shaft"    Long pieces for sure!   But 4 x 8 sheets of plywood.....hmmmm

Dave
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Damned ijjit!

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #875 on: December 09, 2018, 01:12:49 PM »
Interesting point...according to Wikipedia " In 1928, the first standard-sized 4 ft by 8 ft (1.2 m by 2.4 m) plywood sheets were introduced in the United States for use as a general building material."

Earlier development and patents go back as far as 1797 but not production in any large scale it seems.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #876 on: December 09, 2018, 01:32:28 PM »
Good points gentlemen.

We will assume that in this textile mill, the focus would have been on producing  square , say,  2" x 2" or 3" x 3" material for crosscutting into say 10" to 12" lengths for the lathes.. Larger and longer pieces would have been ripped for stays and crossties to be used to bolt the cast iron frames of textle machinery together. The  saw was strictly focused on the needs of the mill.

At that time, I don't think they even had thoughts of machinery that would rotate a log and slice off thin sheets to be laminating into plywood. As Bill mentioned that would be about 30 years after this mill's  functioning.

This saw table is basically only 1/16" thick in places. But the mitre grooves are 1/16" deep. So if you look at the first photo, you will see that they have cast.ribs down the table 1/8" deep to allow for the grooves, Also, the mandrel pulley belt almost touches the bottom of the table, so that's why you see the recessed 1/16" section.



Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #877 on: December 09, 2018, 10:32:09 PM »
The mitre and the fence complete this interesting table saw.  :)


Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #878 on: December 09, 2018, 10:47:44 PM »
Very nice John. Now on to the lathe I assume  :)

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #879 on: December 10, 2018, 02:13:14 AM »
Hi Bill,

Yes, the foot operated treadle lathe is the last machine . We will assume it to be little more than scrap as many of its parts have been scavaged and used on the other lathes on the floor that are now hooked up to the line shafts. So this stripped antique sits in the corner.

Not a bad scenario, since this is actually one of the most difficult of the PMR machines to make. I can take liberties and simply not make some of the more difficult pieces.

It will be a little bit of eye candy religated to the back corner of the shop.



Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #880 on: December 10, 2018, 02:38:26 AM »
Have it in pieces on the shop bench with some wrenches at nuts/bolts?

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #881 on: December 10, 2018, 11:59:58 AM »
Just about there John. Another amazing journey.

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #882 on: December 10, 2018, 01:06:05 PM »
Hi Chris,
Good idea, but they would have probably taken the parts into the machine room and used the metal desk. The carpenters had a tendency to be very fussy about their wooden work surfaces,  :D

Hi Tom,

Yes the end is in sight. Thanks.

Here is a shot of the saw looking through the window from the engine room and two shots of the saw in the wood shop.

Offline J.L.

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A Bit of Whimsy
« Reply #883 on: December 10, 2018, 07:27:56 PM »
In the last two dioramas, I have put a little bit of humour for the observant.

On this one, the scrap box beside the saw has a label that reads:

HOMER'S GINGER AND BRANDY COMPOUND FOR CRAMPS AND FLATULENCY"

In the third photo, the box at the top of the stairs in the Stuart Beam Engine diorama reads:

"EMBALMING FLUID". 

There actually is a bottle of that stuff on one of the shelves at the back of the engine room.  :Lol:

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #884 on: December 10, 2018, 07:45:43 PM »
 :Lol:

The table saw turned out real nice John.


Dave