Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66609 times)

Offline gbritnell

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #840 on: November 29, 2018, 02:02:01 PM »
Hi John,
Your woodworking skills are an equal to your metalworking. Beautiful pieces!
gbritnell
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Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #841 on: November 29, 2018, 09:08:24 PM »
Thank you for your kind words. I've  had a great run with cardmdoelling as well, but I think I'm enjoying the metalwork just as much.

The shifting mechanism was quite tricky to make and assemble. A steel dowel pin protruding from a disk moves the shifting mechanism a belt width of 1/4" from the idling pulley to the fixed one.


Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #842 on: November 30, 2018, 07:35:52 PM »
John:

Is the blade rotation correct?  Maybe the back edge of the table is raised instead of the front?  That way the wood is pushed uphill into the blade and not downhill?

Either way, I'm sure back in the days when this mill would have been running these guys appreciated not having to rip a 10' long piece of seasoned oak that's 2" thick using a hand saw.

Don

Offline JC54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #843 on: November 30, 2018, 10:23:39 PM »
 Hi John,
      This may be one of my usual stupid questions but I have noticed on several pics of lineshafts that there seems to be a ring type piece on them. It doesn't appear to be connected to anything but I presume it is there for a reason? :noidea: :old:     JC

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #844 on: November 30, 2018, 10:31:31 PM »
Hi John,
      This may be one of my usual stupid questions but I have noticed on several pics of lineshafts that there seems to be a ring type piece on them. It doesn't appear to be connected to anything but I presume it is there for a reason? :noidea: :old:     JC
I have been told they were to knock of dust and fibers as they bounce around on the shaft, don't know if that is true.  John will know for sure...
 :shrug:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #845 on: December 01, 2018, 12:31:46 AM »
Not unlike wat we did as kids, putting a leather ring around the hub of bicycle wheels to keep them clean and shiny. Anyone else remember that ??

Bill

Offline derekwarner

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #846 on: December 01, 2018, 05:18:23 AM »
60 year ago?.... :old: leather rings for the bicycle hubs?....

Yes ...get a sheet of leather about 1/8" thick ..cut a strip about 5/8" wide &  8" long [= circumference]  & we cut a diamond slot in one end,  then a sort of 1/2 tail on the other to twist & lock into the diamond hole opening, wrap around the wheel hub,.......no metal clips or clamps ....just a few drops of oil on the hub which would be adsorbed into the leather ring....

Don't they have them any more?

Derek
« Last Edit: December 01, 2018, 07:12:23 AM by derekwarner_decoy »
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Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #847 on: December 01, 2018, 12:41:11 PM »
Bill and Derek, I sure do remember the leather loops around the bicycle hubs.

Here's one for you. Do you remember the 'clackers' we put on the back wheels? A playing card was clamped to the frame out far enough to come in contact with the spokes with a spring style clothes pin. Very cool.

Are we showing our age?

Hi Don. The pivot point for the table is at the back of the frame as you will see when the table is put in place. The elevating screw is at the front. Rather scary. You would be pushing the work downhill into the blade.  Of course there would be no saw guard.

Online steamer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #848 on: December 01, 2018, 12:49:43 PM »
Bill and Derek, I sure do remember the leather loops around the bicycle hubs.

Here's one for you. Do you remember the 'clackers' we put on the back wheels? A playing card was clamped to the frame out far enough to come in contact with the spokes with a spring style clothes pin. Very cool.

Are we showing our age?

Hi Don. The pivot point for the table is at the back of the frame as you will see when the table is put in place. The elevating screw is at the front. Rather scary. You would be pushing the work downhill into the blade.  Of course there would be no saw guard.

You guys mean the Sturmy Archer hubs that the shifter would rust up and lock on ya....Yes we're showing our age....
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Offline ShopShoe

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #849 on: December 01, 2018, 01:39:19 PM »


"Here's one for you. Do you remember the 'clackers' we put on the back wheels? A playing card was clamped to the frame out far enough to come in contact with the spokes with a spring style clothes pin. Very cool."

I told one of my grandsons about this and he did it last summer. For about a week there were three or four bikes in our neighborhood equipped with that accessory.

I am not sure we're talking about the same Sturmey-Archer hub. I had a genuine 1950s English bicycle when I was in grade school (with trashed nuts and bolts because no one told me about the Whitworth standard.) I had the three-speed Sturmey-Archer hub and I was constantly trying to adjust or damaging the little chain that ran inside to shift the gears. At Coast-to-Coast Hardware, they had a little bin in the bicycle section where they kept them, but they were always out of stock. I fixed at least one with a little wire brad holding a broken link together.

Of course, all us bicycle riders had to know how to use the "Monkey Grip" tire patching kit. and the guy at the corner gas station refused to inflate my high-pressure tires to 50psi, because "That will explode on you: All the Schwinns use 25psi."

Another visit to Memory Lane,

ShopShoe

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #850 on: December 01, 2018, 02:29:05 PM »
Oh yeah, we did the playing card thing too but then one year technology took over and Matel or one of the toy makers came out with an attachment called "Vroommm" or something like that, same result just electronic and battery powered. Fun to remember such things but yes....we ain't getting any younger for sure.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #851 on: December 01, 2018, 02:53:50 PM »
Good memories fellows.

My green Hermes bike never heard of shifing gears!

I am old.

John

Offline Tin Falcon

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #852 on: December 01, 2018, 02:57:38 PM »
Quote
Another visit to Memory Lane,

Yes indeed I too had one of those British import bike with the sturmey archer hub.
I do not recall having issues with the shifting but did no leave the bike outside.
Nor do i remember the fasteners  being withworth standard. That could be due to the fact that my wrench set was a crescent wrench.
and I also remember the the garage balking at tire pressure. Some comment about only truck tires taking that much air.

All my bikes were used in my younger years . Most of my bikes were hand my downs from my dad. He knew nothing about bicycle fit and usually bought bike too big for him .  And hence a little bit big for me as well. The one bike that was purchased for me was a 20" sting ray with a banana seat. Used from a flea market  my older brother stripped it down and painted the frame metal flake purple .That was my ride to school for the following school year, as the rules changed and i was now too close to school to take the bus.The following year a new school was opened and back on the bus.   My one and only bike I purchased new, was after I was married purchased a mid grade mountain bike from the Dover AFB Exchange.

There have been a few times in life when I had to commute by bicycle.
 

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #853 on: December 01, 2018, 04:30:02 PM »
Moving from bike memories to line shaft hangers, we can see a hanger percariously hanging from the line shaft. I believe the line shafts would go into place in the factories well before the machinery was brought onto the floor.

That's what is happening here. The saw's placement will be determned by its drive pulley above.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #854 on: December 01, 2018, 04:37:27 PM »
I see the makings of the wood lathe too in that picture John.  :)

Bill