Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 47225 times)

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #690 on: October 07, 2018, 11:03:42 PM »
Stunning John, as always!!

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #691 on: October 08, 2018, 03:23:24 PM »
Thanks Bill.

Here are two shots of the finished engine; two shots of the first finished detail area - the shelf; and the beginnings of a metal work table to be placed under the window behind the engine.

Online Kim

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #692 on: October 08, 2018, 05:28:55 PM »
I just love the C clamp on the shelf!  And the nut as a paperweight :)
Kim

Offline JC54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #693 on: October 08, 2018, 07:11:45 PM »
You beat me to it Kim. That "C" clamp is just tremendous. This is one of those creations? that every time you look at it you spot something new. A true masterpiece.. :old: :DrinkPint: JC

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #694 on: October 08, 2018, 09:13:57 PM »
Thank you lads.

JC, I think you are right. I've had people look at the original diorama for quite a while and then exclaim, "OH, I see the foreman's apron hanging on the hook... and his spitoon beside his desk!"

I wanted the metal table behind the engine to look as though it were actually angle irons bolted together. #0-80 bolt heads did the trick.

The bench frame really looks like metal doesn't it? It's plastic.

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #695 on: October 09, 2018, 10:35:04 AM »
John, I'm afraid there are just no words left to describe this level of workmanship ... and attention to detail.

Cheers
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #696 on: October 09, 2018, 03:04:03 PM »
Thanks Tom.  You are too kind.

The machine table is ready to dress. I see a ball peen hammer, a machinist's vice, screwdrivers and files and of course the preverbial tool chest with drawers under the table.

Fun stuff.

Cheers...John

Offline J.L.

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The Coal Shovel
« Reply #697 on: October 10, 2018, 04:10:09 PM »
Got sidetracked with the pictures to show the modification of the coal shovel. It is a beautiful little casting from Mountain Miniatures in Lula, Georgia. It is not just stampted tin. It may have been cast in pewter.

But when I received it in the mail, the handle was broken off. As it turned out, this was a good thing. It was a bit too long in the handle.

The repair was easy and the handle has been shortened. I know stokers were of a smaller stature back in the day, but manipuating this shovel would be in close quarters. I should havve had the shovel in hand before I located the coal crib. It should be furthur away from the boiler's face.

That can be one of our little secrets.

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #698 on: October 10, 2018, 09:44:48 PM »
Beautiful shovel - but it looks too shiny considering what it is used for  ;)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #699 on: October 10, 2018, 10:25:19 PM »
I agree. I gave the little bag of coal to a train enthusiast but kept a little back. If I put some glue on the shovel and sprinkle the coal on the blade, it might do the trick.  ;)

Offline Brian Rupnow

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #700 on: October 10, 2018, 10:39:10 PM »
The handle might get black, but the shovel part will stay shiny from the abrasion of the coal it is shoveling.

Offline derekwarner_decoy

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #701 on: October 11, 2018, 12:46:07 AM »
JL.....I believe the 'Tool Chests' you mention were totally wooden construction with small metal rectangular name paper holders on the front of each drawer 

I have seen a number & each was really a piece of timber furniture, and not just a tool box with drawers ...they also sit on top of a bench rather underneath the bench

In many ways, very similar to wooden drawer box's of yesteryear as used by Pharmacists for storing tablets .....

With height if each set of drawers being approximately 1 1/2" high only by say 8" wide....and two drawers side per side on each level.....

Derek
« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 01:24:41 AM by derekwarner_decoy »
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #702 on: October 11, 2018, 01:12:01 AM »
JL.....I believe the 'Tool Chests' you mention were totally wooden construction with small metal rectangular name paper holders on the front of each drawer 

I have seen a number & each was really a piece of timber furniture, and not just a tool box with drawers ...they also sit on top of a bench rather underneath the bench

In many ways, very similar to wooden drawer box's of yesteryear as used by Pharmacists for storing tablets with height if each set of drawers being approximately 1 1/2" high only by say 8" wide....and two drawers side per side on each level.....

Derek

Also used by the Post Office to hold stamps, that is where this one came from. It was painted gray and after re-finishing it holds shop tooling. Dad purchased it many years ago at a government surplus auction.

All the little details are looking great John.

Dave

Offline derekwarner_decoy

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #703 on: October 11, 2018, 01:20:41 AM »
Yes Dave...this is exactly the type & style of ' :old: furniture style tool box' I was referring to.....each drawer has those small metal rectangular name paper holders on the front of each drawer

Imagine paying retail for one these days   :facepalm:

Derek
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #704 on: October 11, 2018, 09:12:48 AM »
Good point Brian.

Hi Derek and Dave. You both are describing tool chests that were created in wood at a time when they were works of art. Polished oak, brass nameplate pulls and compartments for almost every tool. Many found their way to museums. They are priceless. They were created to emphasize the skills of the woodworker.

Dave, that is one beautiful cabinet!

Derek, they were seldom placed on the top of a woodworking bench. That was the working surface. If a board had to be hand planed for example, the wood vice and the dogs were used to hold it in place. The work surface was usually kept clear for such activities. The tool cabinet would be given a very special  place, but probably not on the top of the woodworking bench.

Fellows, we are on the machine shop side of the diorama now. When we get to the wood shop side of the diorama we will talk about woodwowrking benchs and cabinetry.

Metal tool cabinets began to evolve into metal cases with thin drawers like their woodworking cousins. Today we see steel rolling carts with ball bearing drawers used by both machinists and mechanics.

They were far more utilitarian. Here is one I made years ago to fit under my lathe. Measusring tools are in the first drawer, taps and dies in the second and so on.

The other two photos show drawered machinests tool cabinets sitting on lower shelves.

As an aside, if I am right, there were two types of compartmentalizing tools in the woodworker's cabinet; the American and the French style. In the American style little dividers were placed around the perimeter of each tool. In the French style, the inside of the drawer was actually moulded to the shape of the tool.

I learned that one when making walnut cases for Colt replica revolvers. I have pictures of those two differenct styles of cases, but am hesitant to post them here.

« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 09:20:16 AM by J.L. »