Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 70558 times)

Offline J.L.

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Thin Steel Strips
« Reply #660 on: September 26, 2018, 02:07:52 PM »
A friend visiting the workshop who has had a lot of experience with steam engines, suggested a shelf be placed above the future workbench at the back of the engine room and that an indicator box be placed on that shelf.

More about the box later, but here are the metal shelf brackets made from the steel strips found in hanging folders.

If you like the idea of using such thin strips of steel be careful which hanging folder brand you use. Some are flat strips and some have a raised reinforcing rib running down their length. Fortunately I was able to find two last folders that had flat strips.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #661 on: September 26, 2018, 04:10:12 PM »
From shelves I see mounted around the house, it looks as though most are mounted six feet above the floor. So that's 6 in.

With the engine out of the room, holes can be drilled into the back wall with a hand drill for what will simulate lag screws screwed into lead anchors in the concrete wall.

Looking forward to getting that engine back into the room. The long workbench can be made separately and just placed behind the engine under the window later. I couldn't have  mounted the governor bearings without removing it though.

I found my coal shovel! Also looking forward to seeing it up against the firewall in front of the boiler.  :)



Offline Larry Sw

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #662 on: September 26, 2018, 05:06:12 PM »
What ?????  No to-scale wood screws holding the shelf to the brackets ????   :Lol:

Larry S
Fort Wayne, IN

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #663 on: September 26, 2018, 08:39:01 PM »
Hi Larry,
Actually there are lag screw holes for holding the shelf to the brackets. Some of the lag bolts are just fake ones glued in and sanded flush to the backside of the metal.

That box I mentioned contained a steam engine indicator used on the Toronto ferry "Trillium" and was given to my friend by her restoration engineer (photo 1).

At the time valuable measuring instruments and delicate devices were often placed safely in finger jointed wooden cases of oak or walnut. Think of a sextant on a ship. I have one that held a battery and electrical probes (photo 2)

So on the shelf we have a steam engine indicator with the key in the lock.

When all is done, there will be log books and manuals also sitting on the shelf.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #664 on: September 26, 2018, 09:21:49 PM »
Enough of the minutiae with this novelty shot. Tomorrow we get down to some serious work mounting the engine and starting the goveernor stand.

It's of an oiler cast in gunmetal sitting on the shelf in the boiler room. The shot is taken through the window from the workshop side of the diorama.


Offline Kim

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #665 on: September 28, 2018, 05:38:09 AM »
I just love your detail work, John.  It adds so much to your dioramas!
Kim

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #666 on: September 28, 2018, 12:56:17 PM »
Thank you for the nice comment Kim. Looking forward to putting lots of detail on the metal table that will sit under the window behind the engine. I bought a gunmetal 1/12 scale bench vice for it.

I noticed oil leaking through the plaster cast wrap around the elbow joint in the boiler room yesterday. Unusual as MTP threads draw in tightly  to their fittings. I must have inadvertantly unscrewed a pipe a little bit in adjusting the length of a fitting somewhere else.

So all the pipes above the boiler had to come out, be stripped of their coverings and reassembled. To be honest, I like the look of the brass piping as seen in this photo. The cast wrap looked a bit clumpy and rough.

I understand there are rubber covering paints and coatings that woud perhaps look better anyway. We are talking air lines here only - no steam. I've seen a pair of pliers dipped into the can and lifted out creating rubber handle coatings. The product is available in spray and liquid.

Perhaps another time.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 02:06:27 AM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #667 on: September 29, 2018, 02:16:07 PM »
This is not exactly laser cutting!

I have great appreciation for the slots Chris is cutting to join all those holes in his brass gears!  :o

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #668 on: September 29, 2018, 02:49:20 PM »
This is not exactly laser cutting!

I have great appreciation for the slots Chris is cutting to join all those holes in his brass gears!  :o
A little file work will clean off the burs real quick.


 :popcorn:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #669 on: September 29, 2018, 03:32:32 PM »
The shelf and its contents add a very nice touch John!

Bill

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #670 on: September 29, 2018, 04:24:13 PM »
Catching up. The detail and quality is phenomenal.
I always have to be ready to catch my jaw when I look in.  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #671 on: September 30, 2018, 02:04:23 AM »
Fellows, your positive comments are motivating, but I see work on this site that drops my jaw!  :NotWorthy:

Today I took an overall shot that shows both the boiler room and the engine together. Soon it will be possible to start some beamwork in the engine room.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #672 on: September 30, 2018, 05:02:21 AM »
John, you are constantly taking us to a higher level! :o
And the details..... wow. :praise2:
As to the last, we may have a problem with the stoker on that boiler. Ya see, he tries to keep his hands out of trouble so he makes sure to put it against the wall with the handle up. Bad news to grab the dirty, hot, end. :ShakeHead:

 :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :DrinkPint:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #673 on: September 30, 2018, 02:32:39 PM »
Sharp eyes Pete. You don't miss a thing.

You are the second person to put me to rights with little details I have missed with this diorama. Adam's sharp eyes picked up on a missing rivet around the fire tube (Photo 1). That rivet was put in place and christened "Adam's Rivet".

Now the stoker's tool resting against the firewall arch will be known as " Pete's Poker".  :Lol:

Thanks Pete.

John

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #674 on: September 30, 2018, 03:57:48 PM »
Adam's sharp eyes picked up on a missing rivet around the fire tube. That rivet was put in place and christened "Adam's Rivet".
Now the stoker's tool resting against the firewall arch will be known as " Pete's Poker".

Uh oh. Careful there John.
You now have a forum full of members who are going to be more meticulous in their inspection of your work.
Who wouldn't want to be enshrined as "so-and-so's thingie" in one of your dioramas?  ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.