Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 42676 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #630 on: September 14, 2018, 02:08:01 AM »
coming along great!
 :popcorn:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #631 on: September 15, 2018, 10:14:24 AM »
Thanks Chris.

One thing I'm noticing about parting off large diameters is that as the as you lengthen the cut-off bar to reach the centre of the piece, the thin blade tends to flex to the left enlarging the part with a bulge. This is evident in the first photo. You can see that the burge is being removed as the sander flattens the work progressively. This part coud have been chucked or pushed onto an offset mandrel I guess and faced, but I took the esay route.

The second photo shows the competed eccentric with a steel mounting plate. The square section will be milled to accomodate the connecting rod.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #632 on: September 15, 2018, 04:11:28 PM »
That can sure happen John. Just make sure the parting blade is perpendicular to the work and that the cutting edge is not skewed one way or the other. Other than that I have no suggestions.

Bill

Online Kim

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #633 on: September 15, 2018, 05:39:06 PM »
can see that the burge is being removed as the sander flattens the work progressively. This part coud have been chucked or pushed onto an offset mandrel I guess and faced, but I took the esay route.

You actually wouldn't have to use an offset - you could just chuck it up any old way - a collet or even a 3-jaw if you can get a hold of it.  All your doing is facing it off, so it doesn't matter if its turning concentric or not for facing off.  But sanding it worked too.

Your build is looking great, as always, John!
Kim

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #634 on: September 15, 2018, 06:36:14 PM »
Good thoughts fellows and thank you for the kind words.

Kim, I know what you are saying, but I didn't want to chuck the piece at all. I know I could have used soft shims to protect the delicate rim of the eccentric, but I just didn't want to mess about with it. As you can see from the sanding, I knew exactly when a flat surface was being achieved as I neared the rim.

Forgive the dust and fluff on the engine in these photos. I've been sanding the plaster around the pipes. Now if that was asbestos as it would have been back in the day, the lads working in this shop would be at risk for future lung problems. However, I don't think they would have sanded that material anyway. The mixture would have been applied and left to harden without any furthur cosmetic fussing. I was just trying to make the covering to look smooth and pretty!  ::)

These photos show a wooden stick being used as a test pattern for the final part that will operate the engine - the connecting rod for the slide valve.

Notice that there are no threads on the slide valve rod. I'm looking forward to fussing with that later. Also, I can set the valve eccentric externally without taking anything apart.

Offline Tin Falcon

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #635 on: September 15, 2018, 06:40:49 PM »
Quote
One thing I'm noticing about parting off large diameters is that as the as you lengthen the cut-off bar to reach the center of the piece, the thin blade tends to flex to the left enlarging the part with a bulge

.What angle is the tip ground to. I tend to leave the right side long that way any extra material  left on the  parent stock. and IIRC parting is a roughing operation depending on the part.
And you are correct an extra setup take time and work.

Anyway looks like you sorted it out. am i am sitting in my chair commenting.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #636 on: September 15, 2018, 06:48:20 PM »
Hi Tim,

Good point about leaving the right edge of the parting tool long. With woodturning parting, cutting a secondary groove to the left of the main one gives clearance to dissipate heat. I did that with the metal as well, but  your idea makes sense with that leading edge making initial contact.

Thanks for the tip.  :ThumbsUp:

John

Offline J.L.

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Timing
« Reply #637 on: September 15, 2018, 10:10:33 PM »
I read the instructions of how to time a slide valve engine and they crossed my eyes. I understood one word in ten. Something about dead centre, callipers, marking the flywheel, establishing dead centre and whatnot.

For me, the only thing I think is important in setting up is the throw of the cylinder at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock. At 9 o'clock, the cyliner is at it end of travel to the left.  At 3 o'clock, it is at the end of its travel to the right. In both cases, the cyliner does not strike the cyliner lids and leaves a little bit of clearance for the steam to enter the cylinder.

Same for the valve connecting rod. It throws 3/16" forward at 3 o'clock and 3/16" back at 9 o'clock. That's how I determine the length of the connecting rod. Right? I make sure that the tail of the slide valve rod does not hit or leave the supporting casting at the back of the valve chest.

Then it's a matter of setting equal amounts of movement of the slide valve and the location of the eccentric in relation to the crankshaft.

Am I on the right track here?

I've done this before, but it usually is repeated trial and error before the engine runs sweetly.

Tomorrow we try to get this puppy running...



Offline J.L.

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To Date
« Reply #638 on: September 16, 2018, 06:27:45 PM »
The engine is virtually finished. The governor gear will have to be designed and added, but with some tweaking here and there, the engine should run.

A couple of shots before the timing begins...


Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #639 on: September 16, 2018, 06:28:29 PM »
Wow - what a beauty!

Online Jasonb

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #640 on: September 16, 2018, 06:54:39 PM »
Looking good John and I would say you also look about right with the timing, assuming anticlockwise rotation as viewed in your last photo then crank at 12 0'clock and max throw of the eccentric at about 8 o'clock. Or the eccentric grubscrew at 11 o'clock.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #641 on: September 16, 2018, 06:57:16 PM »
 :ThumbsUp: Beautiful. I'm looking forward to the run.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #642 on: September 16, 2018, 07:05:36 PM »
Just beautiful John.  :ThumbsUp:

Bill

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #643 on: September 16, 2018, 07:44:24 PM »
Hi John,

That is an awesome photo with the door and window in the background, so real looking.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #644 on: September 16, 2018, 09:20:27 PM »
Wow, I do like that engine! Beautiful work..... :praise2:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.