Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66440 times)

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #585 on: August 29, 2018, 10:36:54 PM »
Me too John. Everything is coming together nicely.

Bill

Offline propforward

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #586 on: August 29, 2018, 11:18:01 PM »
Superb work - and a really creative way to display everything. Very impressive indeed.

Thanks for taking the time and trouble to post it all step by step. There is a wealth of info here on valuable techniques.
Stuart

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #587 on: August 30, 2018, 12:58:49 PM »
Thank you gentlemen for the kind words. A lot of the enjoyment with this hobby is the sharing of information I learn as I bumble along!

You are right Carl. A small diorama does tell a story. I think it gives the model purpose and draws the viewer's attention to imagine what it would be like to see themselves in that setting. Remember the small Benson diorama? Can you see yourself there? I can still see myself climbing those stairs in the beam engine diorama.

The next step in making the bearings is drilling their 3/16" line shaft holes. Using a 4-jaw has been a learning curve for me. Learning to use a second key was a great help. Using the dial indicator was another challenge.

But with the square stock being used here, the hole simplified the task greatly.  But I learned quickly that you can not depend on the dead centre in the tailstock quill to do the job for you. If you wind it in and tighten the jaws, I guarentee the jaws will draw the centre off somewhere.

Winding the tip of the morse taper out a half turn is the way to go. You can clearly see what is going on as you tighten the opposing jaws.When you think you have the hole centred, then you can wind the centre in until it touches. It should not move at all. If it does, back off and make some more adjustments.

I'm sure there are other ways of going about this, but this method works for me.  :)


Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #588 on: August 30, 2018, 02:35:48 PM »
The first one off the assembly line...

Offline mklotz

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #589 on: August 30, 2018, 03:16:26 PM »
But I learned quickly that you can not depend on the dead centre in the tailstock quill to do the job for you. If you wind it in and tighten the jaws, I guarentee the jaws will draw the centre off somewhere.

Winding the tip of the morse taper out a half turn is the way to go. You can clearly see what is going on as you tighten the opposing jaws.When you think you have the hole centred, then you can wind the centre in until it touches. It should not move at all. If it does, back off and make some more adjustments.

I'm sure there are other ways of going about this, but this method works for me. 

What you need, John, is a pump center.

Take a six inch or so rod and make a 60 deg conical hole in one end and a 60 deg point on the other end.  The male end goes in the hole to be centered and the female end goes onto the TS center.  Now, as the part rotates, the end near the hole will move radially - a motion you can detect with your DI.

The advantage of this approach is that, unlike the radially fixed TS center, the end of the pump center can't exert radial force on the part.

Fancier versions of this spring load the rod but that isn't really necessary.
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Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #590 on: August 30, 2018, 04:01:30 PM »
Hi Marv,
Another case of flying by the seat of my pants.
Now I know how it's done by the pros.
Thanks,
John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #591 on: August 30, 2018, 09:42:31 PM »
PMR is known for using a lot of Phillister headed slot screws. Historically, hex headed bolts would have been used here. This time I just went with them.
Also, I do not believe socket headed cap screw were around at the turn of the century either.

Of course, if you start noting every litttle discrepancy in historical dioramas, the list would be long. I don't even think brass pipe was in use...

These little line shaft hangers are deceptively labour intensive. Tolerences with the two bolts that hold the cap on the hanger are very tight. It would be so easy to break through the side walls.

 

Offline Ian S C

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #592 on: August 31, 2018, 02:53:19 AM »
The way I centre the work in the 4 jaw chuck, is to use 2 centres, I place one between the tailstock centre and a centre hole in the work, then bring the DTI up to the loose centre at the work end.
Ian S C

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #593 on: August 31, 2018, 01:13:53 PM »
Thanks Ian.
And Marv as well. I understand the process now.

These bearings were a good place to learn this process. What I did was not that critical beause the bearing floats up and down, and laterally to compenstate for any discrepencies in alignment. But when it comes time to centre something critical, you both have taught me well.

By the way, I have seen pictures of line shaft hanger bearings on gimbals. Imagine how difficult it must have been back then to maintain line shafts when their bearings were mounted in mills with wooden beams sitting on brick walls. 

Chas A Strelinger & Company's 1895 Book of Tools, Machinery and Supplies show many styles from pages 352 to 357 along with the shafting.

Offline J.L.

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A Governor?
« Reply #594 on: August 31, 2018, 02:07:05 PM »
I'm not sure at all how to connect a governor to this engine, but I'm wiling to give it a try.

Last year, I purchased a set of castings for a Ferrabee Column Engine 1862. I was disappointed with the castings of the column - nothing more than pipe, but included was a set of laser cut parts. They sat around and rusted. But today, with a thought of adding a governor to the engine, they may come to life.

You may recall, I made provision for this possibility earlier with the addition of a steam chest fitting on top.

Here a lower arm is mounted in the vice ready for cutting a hinge slot.

Obviously, the replacement strap from Australia has not yet arrived.

Edit: Thinking that I could use the lazer cut arms for the governor turns out to be wishful thinking. There is only upper arm on the metal sprue 'tree'.   :shrug:

They will have to be cut from 1/4" square mild steel using a square collet.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2018, 08:56:23 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Governor Upper Arms Part 1
« Reply #595 on: September 02, 2018, 02:39:55 PM »
I have never regretted buying square collets and a tailstock die threading device. Both came into play here at the metal lathe.

The workpiece was progressively drawn out from the collet as it was cut to diameter with only a parting tool.


Offline J.L.

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Cross Arms
« Reply #596 on: September 04, 2018, 07:08:54 PM »
The crossarms were made in pairs. One setup did double duty.

I thought I was so smart widening the arms together. Then I remembered that the lower arm slots are narrower than the top slots.  I'll either put washers on each side of the lower ones, or make a new one.

Now for some steel spheres...




Offline J.L.

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Ball Jig
« Reply #597 on: September 04, 2018, 09:18:11 PM »
I saw this idea a number of years ago on the internet. It works, but a collet the diameter of the balls would probably be the preferred method.  :slap:

I dont have a collet the ball diameter and don't feel like taking the time to make one. So a couple of holes in two steel plates will do the job.

A light skiff with an end mill is taken off the balls clampled in a vice finding the centres and creating a nice flat for the centre drill.


Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #598 on: September 04, 2018, 10:40:43 PM »
Nice. That one goes in my reference book.  :ThumbsUp:
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Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #599 on: September 04, 2018, 11:57:51 PM »
More nice progress John. What size are the steel balls?

Bill