Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66534 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #510 on: July 31, 2018, 07:46:14 PM »
Hi Bill.
Thanks. Yes, the cover would have to be removed to steam or air up for testing, but nothing has to be taken apart to adjust the valve otherwise. That's the beauty of the system.

I was not happy with the first hole drilled in the mill for the support bracket. After threading, the stud was tipping upward. In other words, the hole didn't go in straight.

In this photo, I am using a temporary short cap screw to hold the bracket in place while the other three holes are spotted. Then it's back to the old fashioned egg beater drill for some handwork. At least this way, I can keep an eye on everything already in place.


Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #511 on: July 31, 2018, 07:57:01 PM »
I can see now that it would be easier to adjust for sure leaving the rest of the linkage connected. May have to try that!!

Bill

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #512 on: July 31, 2018, 08:53:29 PM »
Just catching up John.  :ThumbsUp:

Excellent (and pretty fast) progress.

I like that grub screw on the valve rod idea.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #513 on: August 01, 2018, 07:29:30 PM »
Thanks Carl.

I'll be able to try out the adjustment using that grub screw when the eccentrics go into place.

The slide valve rod support is now in place. It allows the rod to move smoothly back and forth. A lot of trimming was done to its back to get it into position. No shims.  :)


Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #514 on: August 01, 2018, 10:09:34 PM »
Looks good John. I am sure you are glad to get that behind you. Tricky part to get aligned well.

Bill

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #515 on: August 02, 2018, 01:17:53 PM »
It's all looking rather nice John. Another job well done!

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #516 on: August 02, 2018, 06:59:02 PM »
Thank you Bill and Tom.

A lot of satisfaction was achieved when that valve rod finally slid into the steam chest gland.

I must say, using 0-rings really helps in those stuffing boxes. You can feel the gentle resistance while holding and sliding the rod. The gland hole itself can actually be slightly larger.  It really is just a clamp holding the 0-ring in place. And because the gland is stud mounted, the pressure on the rod can be gently adjusted.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2018, 03:02:26 PM by J.L. »

Offline scc

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #517 on: August 02, 2018, 09:10:05 PM »
Lovely work...............Terry

Offline J.L.

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To Date
« Reply #518 on: August 03, 2018, 02:24:22 PM »
Thanks Terry.

Here is the front half of the diorama to date...

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #519 on: August 03, 2018, 02:47:46 PM »
Beautiful!  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline J.L.

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The Eccentric Starps
« Reply #520 on: August 04, 2018, 02:58:36 PM »
Thanks Carl.

A deep centre line for cutting was imbedded when the eccentric straps were cast.  This helped cut them with the mill saw.

I am getting out of my depth here with what's coming. I will be asking for advice as we proceed.

« Last Edit: August 04, 2018, 03:03:01 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Machining the Eccentric
« Reply #521 on: August 04, 2018, 07:34:06 PM »
There seems to be a number of ways to cut the eccentric to mate with the strap. One method as I see it, is to cut a groove in the strap. This I would find extremely difficult as I would have to make an 'L' shaped cutter like a hex wrench and cut into the interior wall of the strap in the centre of its width. The eccentric would have a raised groove to ride in this internal groove in the strap.

The other way seems more manageable for me.Reverse things and cut a track in the eccentric with raised edges. The strap would ride in this groove with shoulders cut to allow it to sit down on the track.

I assume the journal or main part of the eccentric is cut on centre and then moved to the required offset.

The construction plans seem much more complicated with the use of a stub mandrel.

Thoughts?

John


Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #522 on: August 04, 2018, 08:10:48 PM »
Thats the way I usually do it, with the groove in the eccentric cut with a parting tool, and widen out the hole edges in the sides of the straps to leave the tenon in the center hole. With that arrangement you can cut everything with standard cutters, and the end result looks the same when assembled.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Machining the Eccentric
« Reply #523 on: August 04, 2018, 08:29:50 PM »
cut a track in the eccentric with raised edges. The strap would ride in this groove with shoulders cut to allow it to sit down on the track.

I'm not sure I understand. What is meant by 'shoulders'? Wouldn't the strap ride in the groove and be held by the raised edges?
Is it because the thickness of the strap is the same (or thicker) than the groove plus the width of the two edges?
Or is the thickness of the strap equal to the width of the eccentric groove?

Not that I have a whole lot of experience but I do it the way Chris mentioned. And I drill/ream for the main crank then offset for turning/drilling/reaming the eccentric. All done on 4-jaw.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Machining the Eccentric
« Reply #524 on: August 04, 2018, 08:35:28 PM »
cut a track in the eccentric with raised edges. The strap would ride in this groove with shoulders cut to allow it to sit down on the track.

I'm not sure I understand. What is meant by 'shoulders'? Wouldn't the strap ride in the groove and be held by the raised edges?
Is it because the thickness of the strap is the same (or thicker) than the groove plus the width of the two edges?
Or is the thickness of the strap equal to the width of the eccentric groove?

Not that I have a whole lot of experience but I do it the way Chris mentioned. And I drill/ream for the main crank then offset for turning/drilling/reaming the eccentric. All done on 4-jaw.
I am probably not using the right terminology, but this shows what I mean. The groove is in the eccentric, and the shoulders of the hole in the strap are taken back to leave a tenon in the center. The width of the groove, the way I do it, is either one parting-tool-width, or wider, and the tenon is sized to be a close sliding fit within that.

As Zee mentions, the groove could also be made the width of the strap, then the strap is simpler, but the eccentric needs to be wider to put the edges of the groove in beyond the strap.