Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66482 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #480 on: July 18, 2018, 02:28:57 PM »
Now that the muscle of the engine has neared completion, it's time to turn to its brain.

Not long ago, there was a discussion on one of the threads about getting a drill to run true down through the open space of a valve chest to engage the lower wall.  I'm sorry I can't recall which one it was, but in it, Jason Ballamy suggested a long centre drill.

I was not aware that they made them in 3 inch lengths as well as the traditional shorter ones. Here is a #1 that is 1/8" in diameter. It should be perfect for this application.

Thanks Jason.

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #481 on: July 18, 2018, 02:54:50 PM »
Neat, didn't know they made the narrow ones that long, should work well.


 :popcorn:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #482 on: July 18, 2018, 03:15:29 PM »
Hi Chris,

Yes, here is a shot showing the setup using that longer 1/8" center drill. A 1/8" collet chuck in the quill of the mill/drilling machine was used instead of a drill chuck.

Now the holes can be opened up to whatever size.



Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #483 on: July 18, 2018, 07:40:45 PM »
Hi J.L.

The wood, copper and stainless against the "industrial green" color makes for a really great contrast.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #484 on: July 18, 2018, 10:16:01 PM »
Very nice John. Those longer length center drills are handy to have around. Nicely done.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Tail Rod Guide
« Reply #485 on: July 20, 2018, 03:53:11 PM »
Hi Bill,

Thanks.

That long center drill put the rest of the project on track without the drill wandering off centre.

The valve chest was not cast with a bump out for the end of the valve rod. The rod's hole had to be enlarged and threaded for a talil rod guide.

An adaptor was made from hex stock to hold the threads of the part as the unmachined portion of it was finished off.

Offline Steamer5

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #486 on: July 20, 2018, 04:01:31 PM »
Lovely work John,

Still quietly follow & along.

MUST investigate those long centre drills!

Cheers Kerrin
Get excited and make something!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #487 on: July 20, 2018, 06:21:15 PM »
Thanks Kerrin,

Yes, I see all sorts of applications for those longer center drills. The one I purchased is called a Long Series Combined Drill & Countersink. In the States, I found them made by Morse and PROCUT. In high speed steel Morse sells them for $19.95 US, but the cheaper PROCUT #1 (AV5213X) was only $6.85 US.

The silicone 0-ring arrived. I was used to putting  both thumbs on the end of the piston's face and pushing to get it to move down the bore. When I put the silicone ring on, I did the same, and the piston flew down the cylinder!

Definitely not suitable for steam, but since I work with compressed air, I think this the way to go.

When the engine is broken in, perhaps I will go back to that black ring for more compression. But for now, the movenement with the silicone ring is as smooth as silk.

Offline J.L.

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Recycling
« Reply #488 on: July 23, 2018, 08:17:03 PM »
Tom, you remember those extra parts that came with the Stuart Beam Engine?

Well, here is an extra governor valve body along with an extruded blank of brass drawn in that shape.

I was going to start fresh and make my own smaller one, but then realized that I couldnt come close to matching the precision of the original part.

So the holes were plugged with turned brass rod and Loctited in place. You can see how close I came to losing the part with my reductions in the second photo.

I have no idea how or where a governor will be worked into this engine, but now was the time to think of one. Real estate will be at a premium on this side of the engine.


No effort was made to cast a pad for an optional governor mount in the base of the engine.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2018, 12:44:40 AM by J.L. »

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #489 on: July 23, 2018, 10:42:38 PM »
I remember "somebody" asking if I was sure I didn't need them as "they" wouldn't have a use for them! Well Done John ... and no, they don't fit on my loom.

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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The Butterfly Valve
« Reply #490 on: July 24, 2018, 03:06:12 PM »
Hi Tom,
You were right. Those extra little goodies in that box have found their way to three engines now.

The butterfly valve fascinates me. I've recently learned that on a slow running engine, they deliberately fool the valve by adding a counterweight to the governor to keep the valve open where they want it, since there is not enough centrifugal force to lift the balls.

Learning all these skills to run their engines efficiently must have also fascinated the engineers of the time. Skills that have long disappeared.

Offline J.L.

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The Governor Steam Valve
« Reply #491 on: July 25, 2018, 04:00:23 PM »
The valve is operational  (without its linkage).

I was able to find a nice little 0-ring 5/32" I.D. to fit into the stuffing box.

The butterfly valve is fixed with a threaded #0-80 bolt. A rivet was suggested, but this way, I can later disassemble the valve to cut off the excess length of the valve shaft.  The lever will determine that length much later in the build.

I was tempted to use threaded rod for the studs, but wanted smooth rod to show through the mounting openings.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #492 on: July 25, 2018, 06:14:07 PM »
Looks wonderful John.  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #493 on: July 25, 2018, 09:46:56 PM »
Thanks Carl.

Marv, do you remember when we bored the tapered holes in the spindle of our PMR engine lathes? I bought the #4 taper reamer to represent that Morse Taper. I think we used it on the drill press quill as well, but I never thought I'd be using mine again.

And here is a #4 taper pin in the crosshead of the mill engine!

The  piston is now hooked up with a nice forward and back stroke.

Time to put the engine in the diorama and have a look see...


Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #494 on: July 25, 2018, 09:59:00 PM »
John, been following along quietly admiring your work.  :popcorn: :cheers:

 First class.  :ThumbsUp:

 John