Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 70489 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #300 on: June 01, 2018, 09:01:05 PM »
This brings to a close work in the boiler room.

If anyone finds a 1/12 scale coal shovel with a wooden handle and a metal/wood 'D' grip on the internet, let me know. I may have to modify a coal scuttle shovel by removing the short handle and making it into a proper coal shovel.



Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #301 on: June 01, 2018, 09:16:43 PM »
John, this is looking very nice. Looks like all the piping lined up well too and the fire door looks great.

Bill

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #302 on: June 01, 2018, 09:35:03 PM »
This brings to a close work in the boiler room.

A brand new boiler room closed for business.  :lolb:

I had noticed the door hangers in an earlier picture.
I may have missed you talking about such hardware.
How were they made and what is the size of the bolts.

Such exceptional work!  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #303 on: June 01, 2018, 11:24:05 PM »
Hi Carl,

Thanks.

No, I did not detail the making of the fire door hangers.

They were milled from solid 3/8" x 1/2" brass stock. The arcs on the top and bottom of the hangers were shaped on a 1 x 24" belt sander. The track wheels were made from 1/2" aluminum rod. The axles are just #2-56 steel bolts threaded into the back of the hangers.

Thanks for asking.


Offline gbritnell

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #304 on: June 02, 2018, 12:23:46 AM »
Hi John,
Many years ago when I made the Case water wagon for my 1" Case traction engine I made a coal shovel exactly like you're talking about. I made it from 2 pieces, the scoop and the round tapered piece that the handle goes into. I silver soldered them together. The scoop was shaped over a hardwood former after being annealed. The handle is made from Maple.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #305 on: June 02, 2018, 02:36:53 AM »
Hello George.

Beautiful model. Thank you for showing the shovel with the wagon.

That seems to be the trick - to get the shovel shaped properly. I see how you would shape the metal scoop section over a hardwood former after annealing the metal, but I like the way you blended the tapered tubular section that receives the wooden handle. That, I would think would be the difficult part. Perhaps it was filed after soldering to have it blend in so smoothly?

Thanks for the inspiration.

John
 

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #306 on: June 02, 2018, 05:57:53 PM »
Time to get that cylinder under way.

I had help with the end caps so the rest is up to me. I've decided to leave the casting texture on the cap. Only the rim has been turned.

To drill the 12 mounting holes, Ernest Winter suggested making a pre-drilled jig to place over the covers. It sounded like a lot of work to make the jig, so I've opted to use the rotary table. The only way I could mount the cap in a small 3-jaw chuck was to mount it on a Unimat indexing head.

In these photos, both the rotary table and the chuck have been trued to a pin projectig out of a collet chuck in the quill.

« Last Edit: June 03, 2018, 11:12:12 AM by J.L. »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #307 on: June 02, 2018, 07:22:39 PM »
That should work well John. And certainly easier than making a jig.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #308 on: June 02, 2018, 09:20:40 PM »
Yes Bill. Both front and back cover plates can be drilled with one setup.

However, this setup is fine for lightly centering the hole locations, but I would not want to drill the #30 holes with this arrangement. There is only a 1/16" register or spigot holding the covers in the little 3-jaw chuck.

I intend to drill the holes down into a sacrificial hardwood block directly on the milling table.


Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #309 on: June 02, 2018, 10:26:01 PM »
Glad you found the indexing head John ... that made quick work of the marking out.

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #310 on: June 03, 2018, 01:51:08 PM »
Hi Tom,

Yes, rotating the table's handle 30 degrees at a go was a lot easier.

The first photo shows the front cover firmly supported on the milling table for drilling.

The second photo shows the front cover sitting on O.B. Bolton's drawing. Notice that I have purposefully rotated my holes. Ernst Winter makes quite a point about the drawing's hole location not being very prototypical of how it was done traditionally. He suggests rotating the holes 'off centre' half a pitch - in my case 15 degrees.

I think I know why. It has to do with the rear cover. I think they wanted the studs to straddle the stuffing box projection.

So, once a vertial line was drawn through the boss, the rotary table was advanced 15 degrees and a centre locating hole was drilled. Then the rotary table was reset to 0 and everything was offset the equal amount from that first hole.



Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #311 on: June 03, 2018, 10:13:21 PM »
It was suggested that one bolt hole in the cylinder be drilled, threaded and the cover secured before the others were spot drilled.

That is the case here. It looks as though the cylinder is clamped in the vice. It is not. It is simply sitting on a large parallel and allowed to float to let the drill centre itself in the remaining holes.

BTW, I found another reason why the bolts are off-set. In the second photo, you can see that they will straddle the drain cock holes as well.  ;)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #312 on: June 04, 2018, 10:50:22 AM »
Threading fun...

1. Indexing

2. Drilling tap holes

3. Threading with a bottoming #5-40 tap

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #313 on: June 04, 2018, 12:51:37 PM »
An editing note here.

I mentioned that it was suggested that one hole be threaded and the cover be fasened with a bolt before the other eleven holes were spot centred.

Here is testament that holding small work rather than clamping it firmly in the vice is a good practice. With only one bolt fastening the cover, I could feel the cover moving ever so slightly as the twist drill end was touching the cylinder to spot the holes.

A second hole was threaded and bolted in place opposite the first one. The vibration disappeared.  Now I would not have felt that if the cylinder was clamped tightly in the vice.

I guess sensory feedback is just as important for drilling small locating holes through templates as tapping small holes.

John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #314 on: June 04, 2018, 06:31:04 PM »
While in the hole drilling mood, I drilled and tapped two #10-40 holes for the cylinder's drain cocks. They are not cheap, but they do add so much to the look of the cylinder.

Also, the piston gland was drilled and reamed 1/4" inch for the piston rod.