Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 38003 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #255 on: May 11, 2018, 06:26:09 PM »
Excellent!!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #256 on: May 11, 2018, 06:33:14 PM »
Thanks Chris. Appreciated.

The original plans for the Bolton No.7 did not include any provision for a governor. The flywheel was designed to ride hard up against the left bearing. You can see that space has been provided here for a 1/4" governor pulley if one is to be designed.

The wider space between the right bearing and the take-off pulley is for two eccentrics; one to drive the valve rod and one to operate the feed pump.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #257 on: May 11, 2018, 07:39:44 PM »
I'm still following along John.  :popcorn: :popcorn:

Your threads are always inspirational and provide many dreams of future projects.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #258 on: May 12, 2018, 01:19:20 AM »
Beautiful John, as usual  :)

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #259 on: May 12, 2018, 02:41:24 PM »
Thank you fellows. You keep me motivated.

Before I step into machining the cylinder, I thought I'd finish the flooring in the shop. The baseboards can't be placed until this last wall is in place.

Chris, you were asking me about the muntins and mullions earlier. I did not show a picture of the setup.

The 'glass' or plastic in this case, is scribed first. Then the bars are glued onto the plastic straddling the lines. Both sides of the window have to have the bars. Doing only one side makes the window look terrible.


« Last Edit: May 13, 2018, 06:05:51 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #260 on: May 13, 2018, 03:05:34 PM »
The east wall of the shop allows things to be finished up in this room.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #261 on: May 13, 2018, 03:08:01 PM »
Those who have done trim carpentry know how the finishing touches really make a difference.

The first pic shows the flooring meeting the wall under the window; the second with baseboard just sitting up against the wall not even glued. But what a difference.


Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #262 on: May 13, 2018, 03:10:15 PM »
A final look at the flooring as seen through the door and the window in the engine room.

Online Kim

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #263 on: May 13, 2018, 03:16:22 PM »
Very nice looking floor, John!
And yes, the trim does make a huge difference, doesn't it?
Kim

Offline J.L.

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The Cylinder
« Reply #264 on: May 14, 2018, 12:15:01 AM »
Thanks Kim.

So now we step into the cylinder. It is quite a large casting. The bore is 1 1/2" and the stroke will be 2 1/4".

I did not bore or face this cylinder and looking at the result, I am glad I had professionals with heavy equipment do it for me. 

I think I will start by bringing the cylinder ends to 2 3/8" diameter. Then I can make the front and rear cylinder covers.

You will note that I am not starting with drilling the ports or the steam passages. I will be working myself up to that fun later...  :???:

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #265 on: May 14, 2018, 01:37:08 AM »
Very nice John, and yes, the baseboard trim adds a lot!!!

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #266 on: May 14, 2018, 01:09:53 PM »
I agree Bill. Molding profiles that small on top of the baseboards are best done with specified model making machinery. I got the trim at a dollhouse supply outlet.

The cylinder on this mill engine is bolted down from underneath the baseplate with three studs and nuts. But in reading the manual, the cylinder is only attached after everything in the drive train is hooked up. Then it is bolted down onto the baseplate and the baseplate (with everything attached) is turned upside down to spot drill for the mounting studs. Sounds awkward.

So the slotted hole won't be used. But it might be a nice option if something has to be tweaked just a tad later.
 

Offline J.L.

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Pulley Blocks
« Reply #267 on: May 18, 2018, 04:05:38 PM »
Didn't feel like stepping into heavy cylinder machining so I went to some lighter fare back in the boiler room to do some unfinished business.

Four brass pulley blocks with aluminum sheaves will be bolted under heavy beams to operate the dampers at the back of the boiler. They will be painted black.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #268 on: May 19, 2018, 04:00:38 PM »
And here is one of the blocks bolted to a beam. Counterweights were used to raise or lower the dampers.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2018, 04:18:13 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Shovelling Coal
« Reply #269 on: May 19, 2018, 04:10:27 PM »
While I am in the boiler room, I am thinking of how coal was shovelled into the boilers. I remember seeing a vintage shot of men standing in front of the boilers with a pile of rocks arranged in front of them that held a pile of coal.

I think fireman drove their coal shovels under the pile to scoop up coal; turn and lift it into the open door of the boiler. I do not think they shovelled coal out of a wheelbarrow. The wheelbarrow was used to dump the coal onto the floor.

Correct me if I'm wrong. The pile of coal would be quite close to the boiler to save steps and allow for a natural movement of the upper body as the firemen turned.

With this in mind I found some leftover handmade bricks and dry fitted a backstop for a pile of coal. I think you can buy scale model coal in small quantities in hobby stores.

Food for thought...
« Last Edit: May 19, 2018, 04:19:04 PM by J.L. »