Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66528 times)

Online Jasonb

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #240 on: May 08, 2018, 08:31:33 PM »
I always use solid. You don't need to go mad peining over the ends particularly if you loctite them in place just make sure the opposite side is well supported.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #241 on: May 08, 2018, 08:32:01 PM »
 Not quite yet John. Still have until the end of the month, but soon yes :D

Bill

Online crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #242 on: May 08, 2018, 09:03:34 PM »
I always use solid. You don't need to go mad peining over the ends particularly if you loctite them in place just make sure the opposite side is well supported.
Agreed. Solid pin, loctite in place, plenty strong, and sanded or filed flush it hardly shows. Some of the loctite will get into the shaft joint, holds more that way too. For high load joint, a steel tapered pin is great, but it requires a special matching tapered reamer.

Offline Ramon

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #243 on: May 08, 2018, 09:14:09 PM »
Hi John - you may find the start of this thread a help - http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php/topic,1660.0.html - it's the info I put up on building a crank for the Mconie.

For an engine that isn't going to have to work for a living pinning isn't really that neccessary as high strength retainer will - providing the fits are correct sizes - be more than adequate for an engine that just ticks over. That said I do usually pin using a mild steel pin and just gently peen the top just sufficient to swell the very outer edge into the hole. I have intimated this before - it's worth repeating I guess. Don't deburr the hole in any way before Loctiting the pin in as no matter how well you finish it off there will always be a witness (short of re- machining) on filing to finish state. It should be invisible if you just leave the hole as drilled.

Personally I would not go down the roll pin route - totally unnecessary with retainer and could prove very ugly visually on what is a fine build to date.

Hope that helps some - Tug
"I ain't here for the long time but I am here for a good time"
(a very apt phrase - thanks to a well meaning MEM friend)

Offline Larry Sw

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #244 on: May 08, 2018, 09:18:50 PM »
Use your vise as a press.

Larry

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #245 on: May 09, 2018, 01:13:04 PM »
Thank you all for indicating your preferred method of pinning the crankshaft and your helpful suggestions.

The pins are in and drying.

While this takes place, attention turns to putting another coat of Poly finish on the Southern Pine random width flooring that will laid in the shop.


Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #246 on: May 09, 2018, 03:12:04 PM »
I'm very glad I went with the suggested solid pins. A couple of them did reveal themselves when sanded flush, but these two came out nicely. Just a trace of the one on the right.

I've hesitated drilling the bearing block holes until now. The holes in the blocks are the tap size holes and can be used as templates for drilling once I get the crankshaft at 90 degrees to the centreline.

I'm sure that when the bearing block holes are enlarged after the holes in the pads are threaded, there will be enough wiggle room for alignment if we are off a tad.


Offline J.L.

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Mounting the Bearing Blocks
« Reply #247 on: May 09, 2018, 03:57:15 PM »
So here is the set-up for drilling the tap holes into the base pads. The square indicates that the blocks (with the crankshaft) are parallel with their faces perpendicular to the sides of the bed.

I guess only time will tell when the connecting rod is hooked up whether everything will line up on centre. I don't have the patience to wait until all the parts are made and hooked up before mounting these blocks.  :slap:


Offline J.L.

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Studs
« Reply #248 on: May 09, 2018, 09:19:23 PM »
I have been always envious of those who get the perfect amount of thread showing consistently above the nut.

I've tried to achieve this myself by limiting the amount of thread the nut can engage. The heads of scale model #10-32 bolts  have been cut off and the unthreaded portion of the bolt threaded the appropriate amount.

In effect, the stud with its washer becomes a bolt. The nut could be Loctited to seal the deal.

All of this is probably plain fare for the experts, but this approach is new to me.

P.S. I retouched my dirty thumbnail.


Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #249 on: May 10, 2018, 04:17:31 PM »
Time out for some flooring...

Offline J.L.

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The Crankshaft
« Reply #250 on: May 10, 2018, 10:12:06 PM »
The through axle is gone. There will be no spinning cartwheels until I see the flywheel and the takeoff pulley running true.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #251 on: May 11, 2018, 12:54:13 AM »
The studs look good to me John, as does the progress on the flooring. Still following along.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #252 on: May 11, 2018, 06:22:13 PM »
Thanks Bill.

The crankshaft in its mounts...  :cartwheel:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #253 on: May 11, 2018, 06:23:09 PM »
The flywheel on the crankshaft...  :cartwheel:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #254 on: May 11, 2018, 06:24:16 PM »
The take-off pulley on the crankshaft...  :cartwheel: