Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66537 times)

Offline mklotz

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #210 on: April 28, 2018, 06:46:30 PM »

Enjoyment of making them went up tenfold when I got rid of those castings.

I understand there is a lively discussion about castings vs. bar stock fabrication.

Too right, John.  As an example, the four gang pulley on this PMR lathe model...



is supplied as a rough, solid casting.  Holding it to drill for a mandrel on which to mount if for turning is problematic at best.  Turning it from a bar of stock with the bar secured in the lathe chuck makes the job the proverbial piece of cake.

One of the biggest advantages of working from bar stock is the fact that each piece comes with a nice "handle" to hold it while detail is applied.
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Offline J.L.

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Bearing Pins
« Reply #211 on: April 28, 2018, 07:46:15 PM »
We are on the same page Marv.

Looking at your headstock brings back fond memories.
 
By the way, did you make the power saw and the foot operated wood lathe? As you know, a line shaft will be going into the woodworking shop. Looking forward to making the saw.

Here are three photos showing the installation of the bearing pins. In the first photo, a larger drill is passing through the cap for the oil hole until it hit the bottom of the bearing. It was then replaced with a smaller 3/64" drill to pass through the bottom of the bearing and into the pedistal block.

I used a trick Willy showed us when drilling a hole for a valve rod through the open space until the drill hit the bottom of the valve chest. He packed it temporarily with an insert of perspex to stop the drill from wandering about until it passed into the bottom of the chest.

You can see a piece of birch dowel filling the bearing hole in the second photo. It also helped the smaller drill centre itself before engaging the bottom of the bearing.

Thanks Willy.

In the third photo, the bearing is seated in its 'saddle'. If you look closely, you can see the steel locating pin. One advangage of having a little recess there: a little resevoir for oil at the bottom of the bearing!



Offline Jasonb

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #212 on: April 28, 2018, 07:49:09 PM »
Those parts have come out very well John, seems like me you get more satisfaction from doing it yourself without the castings. certainly nothing wrong with enjoying whatever method you choose to use afterall we are meant to be doing this for our own enjoymment :)

Regarding the bearing pins, I have seen it done in both ways either the pin which seems to be the more common method or the wick tube from the oiler extends down into the top hole. If using the pin method remember to make the pin from something the same as or softer than the bearing material as if you get a lot of wear on the bearings a hard pin will make a nice groove in your shaft.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #213 on: April 28, 2018, 08:06:40 PM »
Well said Jason and thank you.

I never thought about wear! If the engine were to be used steadily, I would replace those steel pins with brass ones.

Makes perfect sense. Good point.

John

Offline J.L.

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To Date
« Reply #214 on: April 28, 2018, 08:38:04 PM »
Here we have the primed bearing sitting quietly on their pads waiting for paint and fittings.

I think they will be waiting awhile. I'd like to tackle that door into the woodworking shop next.  :)

Offline mklotz

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Re: Bearing Pins
« Reply #215 on: April 28, 2018, 09:37:26 PM »
By the way, did you make the power saw and the foot operated wood lathe? As you know, a line shaft will be going into the woodworking shop. Looking forward to making the saw.

Yes I did.









In fact, I've built all the PMR machine tool models.
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Offline Chipswitheverything

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #216 on: April 29, 2018, 08:45:26 AM »
Enjoyed looking at the fine historic m/c tool models Marv, and the gallery of your other attractive tool models that the enlargement references.    Re. the circular saw, I suppose that the model is prototype based and safety factors were seldom to the fore one hundred plus years ago  - no fixed guard over the blade, and no riving knife behind it to prevent the timber being hurled forward by the back of the saw blade if the kerf contracts.
 But using a power saw bench, one often pushes the wood on through, very often fed through by the following length of lumber.  I can see interesting situations as the cut timber lands haphazardly and pings off into the spokes of the driving pulley...!   I wonder if users tended to concoct some sort of shop made, probably wooden,  cover to locate over the moving elements?
  Dave

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #217 on: April 29, 2018, 01:47:10 PM »
Thanks for the photos Marv. When this diorama is finished we both will have made all the PM floor machine models.

Marv, in a diorama representing the last of one century and the beginning of another, that antique pedel powered wood lathe would probably wind up in the corner covered with a tarp. With the advent of line shafts, wood lathes were quickly converted. In a textile mill, there could have been quite a few at work. There were many spindles, shuttles and spools to be turned and reparied upstairs.

Hi Dave,
You may be interested in knowing that the saw arbour does can not be raised or lowered. Only the table can be tilted up or down to adjust the depth of saw cut. Get your head around that one.

I appreciate very much the acceptance of me diverging on this site often from model engine making to discuss items not related to machining engines at all. Many have said that the diroamas enhance the engines and add to their realism. I agree.

Thank you.

With that in mind, we turn our attention to some door hangeing. Houseworks in Atlanta, GA import 1/12 scale doll house doors and advertise them as interior doors. They are not. But because they have no hinges, they are forced to locate a pin at the bottom of the door to allow it to swing. Hense the 'exterior' sill.

Once you remove that sill, the door won't operate unless you provide a means of locating a bottom pin. Also, you have to add door stop trim around the door to prevent it from swinging in and out like a saloon door.

This provides a great opportunity for some kit bashing.

Here is the revised door with no sill between rooms. The flooring strip will mate with plank flooring later which will run perpendicularly.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #218 on: April 29, 2018, 04:01:06 PM »
The door will be painted white on one side and brown on the other. So while the white paint dries, I thought I'd have a go at the grub screw on the flywheel.

A keyway was another option, but from what I've read, this is quite a powerful engine (3/4 hp) and it could be used for serious, continuous use. A keyway would make sense for those applications.

But, I will be running this engine for what; one to two minutes at a time to impress family and friends? I think a grub screw will suffice.

The vice is canted 30 degrees to clear the chuck and bring the grub screw close to the centre of the bore.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 04:32:29 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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The Flywheel
« Reply #219 on: April 29, 2018, 07:58:34 PM »
We have three-quarters of a pound of cast iron now ready to maintain momentum...

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #220 on: April 29, 2018, 08:45:37 PM »
Great looking flywheel! Like the door too...

 :popcorn:

Offline J.L.

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Square Corners
« Reply #221 on: April 30, 2018, 04:25:46 PM »
Thanks Chris.

Making square corners in wood panels can be a pain if you have to file them. I'm not good at it and the corner never really looks that crisp.

Here's a tip to cut perfect right angle corners.

Dave, I mentioned that the table on the early table saws had to be tiipped to expose more or less blade. But with our new saws, the saw mandrel can be raised or lowered because of its attached motor. To get square corners, you simply raise the blade up into the work until you see the blade peek through. 

In the first photo kerf overrun is not a problem as the wall will be panelled.


Offline Chipswitheverything

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #222 on: May 01, 2018, 08:12:17 AM »
Hello John, enjoying your progress reports as always, and thanks for the comments about the interesting model saw bench.   I used to use various smaller industrial sized circular saws and other machine woodworking equipment quite a lot at my former places of work.  In the workplace, though not at home!, removal of the blade guard and riving knife is not an approved practice in modern times, and would call for some other guarding provision : a guard of the type mounted on a separate overarm might be OK, but then you might not be able to see the extent of the kerf! Probably things were easier when a few fingers more or less hardly mattered! , not to the employer anyway...   
  Did you brush paint, or mask and spray your flywheel?  When I brushed the 7" flywheel on my Stuart No 1 engine I had a game keeping the paint edges "alive" as the work continued, there are more and more of them as you go round the spokes!      Dave

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #223 on: May 01, 2018, 10:57:36 AM »
Hi Dave,
You have taught me a new term 'keeping the edge "live". I undertand perfectly what you are saying. I am not good at paintnig metal surfaces.

No, the rim and edges of the wheel were masked. I used paint custom prepared and pressurized in a spray can and purchased at an auto paint supply store. I used the type that does not require a topcoat.

Care was taken to keep the  painted edge 'crisp'. I find the eye very unforgiving if the painted edge of the wheel wavers.

Thanks for asking.

John
« Last Edit: May 01, 2018, 11:00:55 AM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Shop Door
« Reply #224 on: May 01, 2018, 03:27:01 PM »
The door kit was designed for a standard 2 x 4" studded wall. Rahter than thicken the frame to fit the 6" back wall of the mill, an arched recess was formed into the concrete wall.

The door has a shaped strike plate in the jamb made out of shim brass to give it a satisfying 'snap' when closed.

It's back to some metal now. I'd like to make the crank webs next. They don't look too difficult.