Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66608 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #195 on: April 25, 2018, 01:16:40 PM »
I agree Bob. Creativity; the mother of invention.

Hi Chris,
I read on your steam shovel thread that weight was becoming an issue when moving the model around. I too, have had to have help in moving my diorama off the saw table so that I could use the saw. I have had good luck with stainless steel tables (18 gauge) with castors. They are not as secure or stable as what you are considering,but they certainly make life easier.

Wheels on the bottom of the cart can be a problem with vibration and movement, even with the wheels locked. In the second photo, I have shown stabilizers that can be dropped down with adjusters that take the weight off the wheels and make the table very stable. Much like heavy equipment drop jacks to lift the vehicle off the tires before they start to do thier work.

Cheers...John

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #196 on: April 25, 2018, 01:19:34 PM »
Hi John, great tip on the tables, thanks!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #197 on: April 25, 2018, 09:19:25 PM »
You are very welcome Chris.

A big thank you goes out to Thomas Saunders who came over this morning to help me with the bearing blocks. It was not a boring morining at all! ::)

We went through the drill  ::) of bringing the saddle holes in the blocks to 5/8".

Here is an unadulterated shot of the blocks straight onto the desktop for photographing without any edge softening, added fillets or hole fiilling. The oil holes will be drilled and threaded later.

The arc on the caps have been left proud of the flats for washers. It also made sanding the arcs easier without marring the flats.

Note: Safety was critical with the sanding of the aluminum. The belt and disk sander was removed from the grinder area and cleaned thoroughly. A dusk mask was worn at all times during the profiling of the pieces.

I have read that aluminum in the presence of steel or iron can cause explosions?  :o

And breating aluminum dust is a no-no from what I've read.

 

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #198 on: April 25, 2018, 10:43:11 PM »
Always a pleasure to help John.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #199 on: April 25, 2018, 10:46:09 PM »
I think thermite is basically a mix of iron oxide and aluminum powder. It takes a pretty hot ignition source, so general cleaning is good but no need to be surgically clean.

Online derekwarner

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #200 on: April 25, 2018, 10:56:23 PM »
So JL says......"I have read that aluminum in the presence of steel or iron can cause explosions?  :o "
____________________________

In Australia JL, aluminium is banned in underground gaseous Coal Mines.......steel if dropped on an aluminium  surface can create a spark....this then would ignite the gaseous floor [C O series gasses (principally Methane CH4 ) and cause an explosion

The C O series gasses are also called Bottom Gas...as [heavier than air] they settle to the mine tunnel floor.....many hundreds' of Coal Mine workers have been killed in such explosions....in 1979, 14 Miners were killed in a Coal Mine explosion just 20 Km from our City of Wollongong

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjalp6es9baAhXFu7wKHcBaCNsQFggnMAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAppin_mine_disaster&usg=AOvVaw1pUk5aEfJcm30ZCJbyVIS9
« Last Edit: April 25, 2018, 11:04:42 PM by derekwarner_decoy »
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
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Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #201 on: April 26, 2018, 04:16:23 PM »
Good but sad information Derek. Thanks. So I guess it can be sparks and not just high heat that set things off.

The oil hole in the cap of the blocks is being centred here. It will be drilled for a 3/32" pin to pass through, not for the oil cup threads.

I read and saw a diagram where a little pin sits at the bottom of the saddle and prevents the brass bearing from rotating. I guess this means that the bearing can be later removed if necessary - a situation not possible if Loctite is used.

So the drill will be used to drill all the way through the cap and the bearings into the lower portion of the bearing block.

Then it will be sized up in the cap for #8-32 threading.

If I had made split bearings, only the lower half of the brass bearing would require the little hole.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2018, 04:20:35 PM by J.L. »

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #202 on: April 26, 2018, 04:34:48 PM »
I'd like to know more about that little pin.
When is it necessary to prevent the bearing from rotating?
Are there other methods used in the field?

Thanks.

[EDIT] Now that I think about it, seems I've seen cases where the oil cup itself prevents the bearing from rotating. But something bothers me about that.
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
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Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #203 on: April 26, 2018, 05:22:33 PM »
I'd like to know more about that little pin.
When is it necessary to prevent the bearing from rotating?
Are there other methods used in the field?

Thanks.

[EDIT] Now that I think about it, seems I've seen cases where the oil cup itself prevents the bearing from rotating. But something bothers me about that.
The MEM Corliss was one that used the oil cup to keep the bearing from turning in the holder. If the bearing has a round outside, you don't want it spinning in the holder, just the shaft within the bearing. Also, if there is no lip on either side, the bearing can walk itself out of the holder if it is not pinned. On the split bearings, I usually put in a drop of loctite between the bearing and the holder to keep them in place, a real nuisance when the keep shifting and falling out as you put the holder on.

Offline J.L.

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Bearing Pin
« Reply #204 on: April 26, 2018, 09:08:19 PM »
Disregarding my camera's parallax, this diagram is self-explanatory.

I would think anohter advantage to installing the pin would be that bearings tend to run themselves in and become comfortable in a certain position. If the bearings were taken out and put back in for any reason, without the pin, the bearings would probably not return to the same position.

Probably a small point, but worth considering. The bearings should be concentric no matter where they are positioned before tightening the caps, but you never know...

Note:
Drawing Credit:
Ernest Winter, Building the Bolton No.7 Horizontal Mill Engine, 1992, pg. 21


Offline john mills

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #205 on: April 26, 2018, 09:21:31 PM »
The bronze bush should be a tight fit in the hole  when the cap is bolted down as is meant to hold the bearing
in place the pin locates for assembly .with automotive bearings the lugs on bearing shells locate on assembly
but the shells will soon spin if the tunnel sizes are too  loose .

Offline J.L.

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Bearing Brasses
« Reply #206 on: April 27, 2018, 02:51:43 PM »
The first bearing brass has been reamed to 7/16" and turned with 7/8" flanges, and a 5/8" waist which was cut with a parting tool.

Thanks again for that 5/8" dril Tom.



Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #207 on: April 27, 2018, 03:55:35 PM »
No problem John ... glad to help.

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #208 on: April 27, 2018, 10:09:28 PM »
Looks good John. Still following along here  :popcorn:

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #209 on: April 28, 2018, 06:18:20 PM »
Thanks Bill.

The bearing blocks with their brass solid bearings are nearing completion.

Enjoyment of making them went up tenfold when I got rid of those castings.

I understand there is a lively discussion about castings vs. bar stock fabrication. :stickpoke:

Here is a prime example for me, of where starting from scratch has an advantage. Now something like a cylinder block casting... that's another matter.