Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 8673 times)

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #165 on: April 13, 2018, 06:39:23 PM »
Thanks Jason.

I like your idea of gripping the outer surfaces of the casting to prevent spread. Even if my lathe chuck is not running true (I know it isn't), there will be enough meat left on the casting to true things up when the bored hole is mounted on the turned down mandrel.

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #166 on: April 13, 2018, 09:25:51 PM »
I could not get that spigot centred properly in the 4-jaw, so I just took your idea Jason of grabbing the whole thing and turned this face.

Now I wish I had cut off that spigot. I am not going to take this casting out of the chuck until the finished hole is drilled and reamed to 7/16". So that extra metal is back in there unused.


Offline john mills

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 15
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #167 on: April 14, 2018, 01:44:18 AM »
i don't know the part made from the casting .But if the spigot is for holding the casting is set so the main important dimensions can be obtained ,the parting line needs to be along and on the centre line and important diameters central.then the spigot turned to that.its a casting so it may be way off but if there is enough metal and it is to be removed latter it does not matter.Then if the casting can be held from the spigot the od. can be
turned true depending on how much metal on the casting then that makes it easier to set up straight for further machining remember it is about the parting linen the centre and at both ends. hard to get if it is back inside the chuck.

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #168 on: April 14, 2018, 02:46:26 PM »
Well John, after reading your response above, I turned the casting around and centred the spigot end on the split line. I  mounted the casting between centres with a lathe dog and attempted to get a rough round with my small Unimat lathe.

Long story short, the casting is in the junk bin. Good thing you suggested gripping both sides of the soldered parts Jason. When I set the part on the desk, it fell apart!

The hole had wandered off the centre line.

So Monday, we go after a couple of Oilite bronze bearings. I will get them long enough so that a faux flange can be put on each end.

In the meantime, I'll see if I can screw up the pedistal blocks. ;D

Offline BAH

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 27
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #169 on: April 15, 2018, 01:19:39 AM »
Wow, canít believe I have missed this thread. Great work as always  :ThumbsUp:

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Flywheel Pit
« Reply #170 on: April 15, 2018, 08:50:41 PM »
Thank you.

Well, I did mess up the cast pedistal bearing blocks! But I don't think my heart was in it to begin with. I guess I'm one of the people who prefer to build up parts from scratch with bar stock.

I read about bringing the blocks to 1/2" thickness by mounting them in the 4-jaw chuck. No, I think I will begin with material that is 1/2" thick and use my mill/drill for drilling and shaping.

The MDF blocks are very crude in this photo, but they serve a purpose. They determine whether the flywheel will clear the floor of the room.

Only a shallow pit was required.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 08:53:59 PM by J.L. »

Online Jasonb

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5200
  • Surrey, UK
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #171 on: April 15, 2018, 08:57:40 PM »
With the type of crank you have on that engine you really don't need split bushes you could just use bar, ream the hole and use a parting tool to cut the waist.

If you do go down the oilite route then you can buy flanged ones which would give you a flange on one side so just dummy the other or buy 4 of them, cut short and fit one from each side so you have flanges both sides.

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Bushings
« Reply #172 on: April 15, 2018, 10:12:24 PM »
Hi Jason,

I find your comments very reassuring. You are open to alternatives and willing to share your thoughts freely. That's what makes this site work!  :ThumbsUp:

I like your idea of four bearings with flanges. Hopefully, I can get 7/16" I.D. Oilite. There is a pretty good bearing store here in Peterborough.

We'll see.

Thank you Jason.

John

Offline john mills

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 15
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #173 on: April 16, 2018, 10:10:21 AM »
Hi  john,
sorry to see you did not have success with the castings ,working from bar would be easier  i would machine two rectangular blocks  both the same thickness ,then solder together.I would make them long enough to hold in the four jaw chuck by full length of the chuck jaws . it would be easier to set square and the jion in the centre .
I would drill well under size ,remove the rake from the drill so it won't grab.Then you can turn the out side and bore the hole in the same setting.If you finish to size with a reamer only leave a few thou to ream .Then the part can be cut off in the vice if you like turnaround to face the other end  required.
i loo like the look of the boiler you have done a great job.

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #174 on: April 19, 2018, 03:51:03 PM »
Thanks for your advice John.

I have decided to strike out on my own and make the bearings and the pedisrtal bearing blocks from scratch.

These photos show the first stages of making the pedistals.

Online Jasonb

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5200
  • Surrey, UK
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #175 on: April 19, 2018, 06:55:52 PM »
We'll have you scratch building whole engines before long John ;)

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #176 on: April 21, 2018, 08:33:07 PM »
Hi Jason,

I don't think so, but thanks for the vote of connfidence with what I'm able to make.

Here are the blocks ready for drilling  the large hole to receive the brass bearings.

When things get stressful, I slip into some diorama work...
 

Offline J.L.

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1217
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #177 on: April 21, 2018, 09:05:00 PM »
Did I say stressful?

Well, I think I have the blocks centred in the 4-jaw, but I've never bored a hole before. I bought these carbide boring bits some time ago.  They don't look like those thick round bars people use with a little bit sticking out the side, but if I drill a hole up to 35/64" (my largest drill), I should be able to continue on with these boring bits up to a 5/8" hole.

The narrow necks on the tools concern me. They are out so far from where they can be gripped, they may 'spring'.

We'll see what light cuts in aluminum will do...

Offline Larry Sw

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 5
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #178 on: April 21, 2018, 09:21:18 PM »
Your problem with those boring tools will probably be that they are not sharp.
If you have a diamond coated hone you can improve them a bit to get a keener edge.
Also those narrow necked tools are a bit delicate so don't push the feed and depth of cut too much
or they will bend.
Larry

Offline Larry Sw

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 5
Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #179 on: April 21, 2018, 09:23:05 PM »
An additional thought is that you may want to just try them out on a piece of scrap first before
screwing up a part that you have spent some time on already.

Larry