Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 66648 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #90 on: March 22, 2018, 07:35:22 PM »
Thanks Don.  I'm going to have to look that movie up.

Chris, you are a life saver. Half an hour ago, I heated up a 3/32" piece of brass red hot and let it cool. Sure enough, it bent like butter. I was able to get a 1/8" radius on it.  :o

You see the brass rod with the beginnings of a tee joining the two water gauges.

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #91 on: March 22, 2018, 09:10:10 PM »
Thanks Don.  I'm going to have to look that movie up.

Chris, you are a life saver. Half an hour ago, I heated up a 3/32" piece of brass red hot and let it cool. Sure enough, it bent like butter. I was able to get a 1/8" radius on it.  :o

You see the brass rod with the beginnings of a tee joining the two water gauges.
Glad it worked so well!

Brass and copper work harden very quickly, heating will re-anneal it back to the soft state - does not matter if you let it air cool or quench it, does the same, unlike steel alloys.

Another trick with brass - if you cut some bar stock down the middle, it will tend to go to a banana shape since the rolling process they make it with introduces stresses into the metal on the outside. If you first bake it at 500F for an hour in the oven (degrease it first or you get yelled at!) and let it cool, it takes out those stresses and makes the cut parts stay straight, without changing the hardness of the brass. Only works on brass, steels all have very different teperatures.

Offline J.L.

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Bending Brass
« Reply #92 on: March 22, 2018, 09:23:17 PM »
Thank you Chris. Another valuable piece of information for the back pocket.

Here's another example of how well your heating works on brass. In this photo, I'm holding a rod of brass that was heated in the vice. When it became red, it started to bend under its own weight - a very nice sweet curve. When cool, I flipped it over and heated the next portion red and again it began to curve.

Here's the result.I had to tweak it very little to clear the mud hole.

It can not be put in place at this time. There will be a sump pit in front of the boiler later on. This 'pipe' will drain down into it.

Thanks again Chris.

John

Offline J.L.

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The Case of the Missing Rivet
« Reply #93 on: March 23, 2018, 03:22:46 PM »
Adam's sharp eye caught a missing rivet surrounding the left fire tube. When he informed me of the omission, I stated that when the boiler was complete, a rivet with his name on it would be posted.


Offline J.L.

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Adam's Rivet
« Reply #94 on: March 23, 2018, 03:24:09 PM »
Adam's Rivet:

Online mklotz

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #95 on: March 23, 2018, 03:30:51 PM »
I've heard "rivet counters" referred to in less than complimentary terms, but I didn't realize that they actually existed.
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Regards, Marv


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Online Dan Rowe

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #96 on: March 23, 2018, 03:55:29 PM »
Marv, no rivet counting occurred only close observation. If you look at the photo in post #90 there is a center mark for the missing rivet showing that rivets are set out by the pitch spacing not counting.

Nice work John I have been reading along with interest.

Dan
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Offline Adam G

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #97 on: March 23, 2018, 04:33:55 PM »
 :embarassed: :embarassed: :embarassed:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #98 on: March 23, 2018, 07:54:37 PM »
Hi Adam,
Good on you for finding that missing rivet.  :ThumbsUp:

I appreciate your input very much. You have kept me on the straight and narrow many times with great observations and suggestions.

I'm tempted to keep this rivet gold coloured...maybe.

I've mentioned this source of thin steel before, but here it is again. Hanging file folders have steel strips glued into the folder. Some are flat and some have a stamped reinforcement along their length.

I'm using them here to create the rails or stringers of a steel ladder.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #99 on: March 24, 2018, 06:36:59 PM »
Now the firemen can get up there...


Offline J.L.

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The Pedestal
« Reply #100 on: March 24, 2018, 09:24:21 PM »
Now that I have the cast bed of the engine, I can model its concrete base.

As it stands now, the concrete base is one foot high and the bed of the engine is one foot high. A notch will have to be cut into the base for the flywheel and its pit. Im also not sure about the location of the step-downs or the amount of space necessary to move around the bed of the engine. The valve chest comes off the side of the cylinder, so maybe there should be more room on one side of the bed than the other.

Easy to muck about with design at this stage with foam board.


Online b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #101 on: March 24, 2018, 10:13:58 PM »
Sure will save you a lot of time later John, and errors as well....looking good so far though.

Bill

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #102 on: March 25, 2018, 02:44:57 PM »
Hi Bill.  You are right. Now is the time to get proportions right.

I think layout planning is my favourite aspect of this model engine hobby. The engine is, for me, often just the icing on the cake. That's probably why I stress that the making some of the more difficult parts of the engine are farmed out.

Also, my health of late has not been great. One day at a time.

The plans drawn by O. B.Bolton were far beyond full size. I used my printer to reduce them until the flywheel measured 7". That put the image reduction to 75% . They were too large to fit on the platen, so they were sequentially copied and taped together by putting them on a window where the light would line up the segements.

A lot of extras have to be considered in the layout. A door is lying on the floor of the diorama in one photo. Its swing has to be taken into consideration when locating the engine platform.  The width of the fire door as to be considered when determining the depth of the engine room floor. And so on.

The last photo shows the boiler sitting next to its mock-up.
 
« Last Edit: March 25, 2018, 02:49:02 PM by J.L. »

Offline Kim

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #103 on: March 25, 2018, 03:17:35 PM »
Quietly following along with your diorama build, John.  I really enjoy watching you work!

That engine is a lot bigger than I thought!  Seeing your hand next to the 1:1 drawing gave me some scale.  That's going to be a pretty heavy engine!

Kim

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #104 on: March 25, 2018, 06:14:19 PM »
Hi Kim,

Thank you. Yes, this is a large, heavy engine. It is rated at 3/4 HP with a bore of 1 1/2". The cylinder is huge. Apparently, it can be used to do real work.

The base is 3" wide by 14 5/8" long. Quite a hunk of cast iron. There is no governor on this engine.

I thought the piiping to the engine would be 1/4" OD. No so. It's 5/16". So I will have to buy new MTP pipe taps and dies.

I'm finally getting a handle on the size of the diorama floor. It will be approximately 24" wide x 34" long.

Cheers...John