Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 60645 times)

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #900 on: December 13, 2018, 07:54:13 PM »
ON all of the old stuff that I have seen and/or torn apart that had grub screws, the screw was one of two flavors.  If the grub screw was 1/4" - 3/8" diameter or less, then the screw was slotted.  The stuff that was larger than this the screw had a square head, usually with the flats as large the diameter of the screw would allow.  Look at pictures of the pulleys on old line shafts and you'll see what I mean.

Don

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #901 on: December 13, 2018, 09:11:42 PM »
Thanks Don.

Makes perfect sense to me.

Mind you, I'm not going back through all the dioramas and change every grub screw.

You would think PMR would have done some basic research before opting for socket headed grub screws.  But it may have been a case of availabiliy and the torque value of a socket head. As Bill said, the builder has the option of what type to use.

John
« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 09:19:00 PM by J.L. »

Offline Admiral_dk

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #902 on: December 13, 2018, 09:30:02 PM »
Quote
Mind you, I'm not going back through all the dioramas and change every grub screw.

Ow - come on  ;)

OK, joke aside, you're still doing great and I continue to enjoy the project as it progresses  :praise2:    :cheers:

 :popcorn:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #903 on: December 13, 2018, 10:22:02 PM »
Much appreciated.

I have attempted to make all three legs of the lathe level with what will be the ways.

I am going to really cut down the work on this wood lathe, Some will have noticed the wooden box under the lathe. That's where the unused parts will go. We will asume that other parts have been stripped from this lathe and used on the other set of lathes in the larger portion of the wood shop.

This is a very tricky little kit. A lot of precise machining of very small parts would be needed to bring out its charm and accurate functioning.

Marv, you built this machine - right?

Do you agree?

John

Offline mklotz

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #904 on: December 14, 2018, 06:18:46 PM »
Yes, John, I built it and, yes, there are some tricky bits.



I tried to fix it so it could be turned by using the treadle pedal but never got that to work.  The flywheel, being aluminum, has a very small moment of inertia.  I added a hidden steel band inside the flywheel to increase the moment but even that was not enough to overcome the friction of the belt.

I wanted to mount a turning on centers and decided, for authenticity, it needed a four-blade live center as used on full-size wood lathes.  Milling that into a miniscule taper pin would have to be done "with the dials" since my eyesight wasn't  good enough to do it by sight.  I decided to test out my milling plan computations in brass first and the result is shown below.



The live center came out perfectly and made it a bit easier to bear the fact that I couldn't get the treadle to work properly.

Oh, and like you, I replaced all the slotted screws with proper hex heads.



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Regards, Marv


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Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #905 on: December 14, 2018, 06:45:54 PM »
Marv.,
Thanks for responding. Your machine is absolutely perfect.

Mine will be a stripped down version partially covered with a tarp! And so it should be compared to this masterpiece of yours.

Marv, your lathe should be mounted on a walnut base and proudly displayed on the mantlepiece!  :ThumbsUp:

Offline RJ

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #906 on: December 15, 2018, 02:25:00 AM »
Heads up JL - I got this far. I'll spend some time now learning how to navigate around.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #907 on: December 15, 2018, 04:04:25 PM »
Welcome to the site RJ.

The banjo is seen here in photos one and two; the tool rest mounted in three and four.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #908 on: December 15, 2018, 07:53:38 PM »
Kudos to PMR for casting a chucking boss to the end of the tailstock.  :praise2:


Offline Roger B

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #909 on: December 15, 2018, 08:01:23 PM »
Still following along and enjoying  :praise2:  :praise2: Your and Marv's miniature  machine tools are splendid  :ThumbsUp:  :ThumbsUp:
Best regards

Roger

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #910 on: December 15, 2018, 09:07:26 PM »
Thank you Roger.

Marv, I have a question for you. At the back of the tailstock barrel there is a little section that is threaded #8-32. Now how to thread that little portion with a die is beyond me. The bottom back edge of the tailstock is in line with the back of the barrel.

I think I will just be taking a three-corner file and representing some threads there. Just cosmetic.

This is not critical as I am not going to insert a quill or fashion the back of its mechanism. All that gear was carried off by workers some time ago to use on a refurbished lathe furthur out on the floor of the shop.  ;)

But I'm curious.

Cheers...John


Offline mklotz

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #911 on: December 15, 2018, 11:16:41 PM »
It's been a long time, John, but I think I improvised a small cylindrical die.  Basically, I drilled and threaded a piece of steel 8-32 then filed some longitudinal grooves into the threads to create some admittedly crude cutting edges.  It only needed to work once and in soft aluminum at that.

The photo shows the disassembled tailstock with the thread.  Lying below it is the barrel; if you look really closely you can see the longitudinal slot that interfaces with the barrel lock lever.  It's threaded 0-80 to accept the drive screw visible in the end cap lying to the left of the tailstock.  I cheated a bit here too.  I wasn't going to search for and buy a 0-80 left hand tap and screw to make the crank operate correctly.  The barrel moves in and out as you operate the crank but you have to turn it in the opposite to normal direction.



While I had the camera out, I took a photo of the four prong live center I mentioned earlier for my own records.  I'm throwing it in here to prove that it really exists.



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Regards, Marv


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Offline AOG

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #912 on: December 16, 2018, 01:12:35 AM »
I am impressed at the scale you guys are working in. Some of the parts for Elmer’s engines drove me crazy in terms of work holding and threading. I couldn’t see half the parts you are talking about much less actually make them.

Tony

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #913 on: December 16, 2018, 01:44:15 AM »
Hi Tony,
Yes, #0-80 and #1-72 threads are the norm with some of these machines.

Thanks you Marv for your detailed description of the threading and you photos.

You know Marv, I've decided to change the design a bit and assume the threads for the back of the barrel to be internal.. That means I get a clean casting right to the end of the tailstock casting. That's how my General 160 was designed.

Thanks again,
John

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #914 on: December 16, 2018, 02:00:03 AM »
 :ThumbsUp:

You're building your own world there, John! Make it any way you want!

 :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.