Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 70603 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #885 on: December 10, 2018, 07:46:04 PM »
 :lolb: :lolb: :lolb:
Is the embalming fluid the Jack Daniels brand?   :LittleDevil:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #886 on: December 10, 2018, 10:07:47 PM »
Hi Chris,

I went looking for that bottle of formaldehyde (Jack Daniels would have been a nicer way to go).

It wasn't in the second diorama at all!

It was sitting on a shelf in the Foreman's Office!

I guess he had a plan if the work load became too much....

Cheers...John





Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #887 on: December 10, 2018, 10:36:43 PM »
I like the way the foreman thinks  :wine1:

Bill

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #888 on: December 10, 2018, 10:54:31 PM »
 :lolb:

This is good stuff.  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #889 on: December 12, 2018, 08:30:34 PM »
 :)

Now for the disassembled and cannibalized wood lathe collecting cobwebs in the corner. They must be keeping it for sentimantal value.

I've had a running discussion on this site and with PMR regarding the use of phillister headed slot screws vs bolts. You can compare their appearance in these photos.
I think practically they would have used bolts. To my mind, bolts give more purchase and torque capabilities that screwdriver drive screws.

I'm sure the fellows had a wrench in the back pocket far more than a screwdriver.

But I can see why PMR is staying with the slot headed bolts. All the drawings feature them. What a job it would be to redraw the diagrams. Boggles the mind.

I like using the hex headed bolts where possible.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #890 on: December 12, 2018, 09:33:25 PM »
No contest! Hex or square heads are correct, certainly NOT slotted screws!

Excellent work!

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #891 on: December 12, 2018, 10:37:15 PM »
For this time period the bolts should be square headed shouldn't they?  I don't know when square headed bolts fell out of favor, probably about the time of WWII or right before?

I've got the parts my great-uncle had to forge for his "Engineering Ironworks" exam at Iowa State College in 1920.  The nut and bolt that he had to forge and thread were square headed.  If hex head bolts were more common you'd think he'd have had to forge that format.  The center punch that he had to forge and heat treat was hex shaped.  He also had to forge a lifting hook, in today's world it would probably be rated at about a 500 lb. capacity - not that I'm going to ever test it.

Don

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #892 on: December 12, 2018, 11:23:43 PM »
Hello JL,

Your attention to detail is unbelievable......a Jug of Shine would also look good....but maybe not in that shop.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #893 on: December 13, 2018, 01:12:46 AM »
Thanks fellows.

Don, I know that the square head was and still is common on lag screws, but I was not aware that all machine bolts were square headed. I know the nuts were square, so I guess that means the heads were also square.

Thanks.

John

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #894 on: December 13, 2018, 01:17:40 AM »
I agree John and have quite a collection of these screws provided in PMR kits that have never been used. I guess they assume each builder can substitute to their own preference.

Bill

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #895 on: December 13, 2018, 01:21:25 AM »
I did notice on the Marion shovel near here (made in 1906) used hex head bolts/hex nuts almost everywhere, there were a few square ones but not many. These were all fastening steel parts. Tried searching to find when the hex ones got common, but the stories vary all over the map and into a few other dimensions!

Offline deltatango

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #896 on: December 13, 2018, 03:24:06 AM »
This a bit off-topic but I. K. Brunel, as usual, thought different. These bolts are on the Clifton suspension bridge in Bristol, built between 1831 and 1864. many of the other bolt heads on the bridge are hexagonal (maybe replacements over time), I didn't see any square ones.

David

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #897 on: December 13, 2018, 02:18:27 PM »
Interesting discussion gentlemen.

Don, perhaps hand forging the square headed bolt was the goal for the test. I know that hot and cold rolled steel as well as drop forging was well under way at the turn of the century. I agaree with the fellows that find the hex headed bolts in wide use at that time.

Here is a quick look at the wood lathe being roughly set up. I am flying rather fast and loose with this kit, as much of it will not be made. Some parts will be simply be glued together!

I do like the desisgn of the large flywheel with its serpentine spokes.

Offline Ye-Ole Steam Dude

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #898 on: December 13, 2018, 02:41:37 PM »
Hello JL,

Attached are two photos of a large Old Belt Driven Drill Press that are in my friend's shop and still in use today. Mr. Pete (the father) purchased this back in the early 50's from a old shop in Beaumont, Texas that was going out of business. As you can see, he adapted an electric motor to it and the only repair has been a recent shorting of the belt completed by his son who is now running the shop.

Have a great day,
Thomas

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #899 on: December 13, 2018, 03:35:31 PM »
Thank you Thomas for these two historically significant photographs of early belt driven machinery. It's nice to see this drill press still in use driven by an electric motor.

Speaking of historical issues, I have been using PMR socket headed grub screws on scale models of machines that were in producction well before the turn of the century. Actually the hex headed socket didn't come into production until about 1910.

I atone here with a hex headed bolt on the lathe's crank. I'm not sure, but maybe this is where the slot headed grub screw was in use. It would certaiinly clear the boss's surface when tightened than a hex headed bolt sticking out.

In this situation, the bolt head runs free and clear at the end of a shaft.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2018, 03:40:57 PM by J.L. »