Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 47147 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #855 on: December 02, 2018, 03:04:36 PM »
Right you are Bill. The last set of castings in the diorama.

Here we see the workshop beamwork. These two cross ties carry the line shaft hangers and light lumber for the lighting.

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #856 on: December 02, 2018, 04:07:23 PM »
Wonderful job John :pinkelephant: It just keeps getting better!

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #857 on: December 04, 2018, 02:34:24 PM »
Thanks Tom,
Here's another case of having to do A, before B so that you can do C which is determine the length of the drive belt for the saw.

A: the lineshaft and drive pulley in place
B: The saw mounted on the floor

Sorry for the first two photos being out of focus. I don't often use 'AUTO' on the camera but the model was in an awkward position for the use of a tripod.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2018, 02:40:16 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #858 on: December 04, 2018, 02:37:38 PM »
If you stop and think about it, the saw bade will be turning clockwise away from the operator. Think of the rotation of the crankshaft in the engine room.  :-\

So it will be interesting to see if the shifting mechanism designed by PMR will be robust enough to shift a twisted belt.  :???:


Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #859 on: December 04, 2018, 07:20:48 PM »
John:

Not sure if my eye's are playing tricks on me or not, but if you look at IMG_33 in Reply #833 and IMG_05 in Reply #857, it looks like you've moved the saw blade from one side of the frame to the other.  In IMG_33 the saw blade is on the side of the frame with the lettering and in IMG_05 there doesn't appear to be any lettering behind the blade.  This would effectively reverse the rotation of the blade wouldn't it? 

You don't want the blade to be turning away from the operator, that allow the blade to grab onto the material and launch it across the shop.  Every circular saw that I have ever seen, has had the blade rotation set up to pull the material tight to the base/table, not push it away.

Don

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #860 on: December 04, 2018, 08:10:30 PM »
Hi Don,
Very observant. Yes, I knew the blade was on the wrong side. I must have slipped that arbour in and out about a dozen times while testing the tension on the saw belt. Sometimes the blade was on the right; sometimes on the left. It didn't matter at that point. The focus was on belt tension.

But changing the arbour arounnd would not change the rotation.  You are also right about having the blade rotate into the cut not launching the work across the room.

That's why there is a LH thread on the arbor and the flange nut. As the arbor spins, technically the nut is tightening itself against the blade's flange .

Cheers...John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #861 on: December 05, 2018, 05:13:55 PM »
 :)
I am so pleased with how the belt is operating the saw. It took very little adjustment with belt tension in the engine room to take the load.

Now a shifter has to be fashioned to slide the belt from the idler to the drive pulley.

It would be interesting to test the saw's revolutions per minute  with a hand held device aimed at the blade.

Twisting the belt was not a problem. If I were standing in front of the saw, the belt being turned 90 degrees and appearing thinner would not be a bad thing.

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #862 on: December 06, 2018, 06:25:46 PM »
John:

I'm having a real hard time wrapping my head around this.  I've got the picture of the machine in my head but the way I'm seeing it, at least in the full scale working world, you shouldn't use the same arbor on both sides of the saw.

You said this is a LH thread, which makes sense when you assume several things; the saw blade is on the side of the frame with the lettering, the end of the table with the adjusting screw is the feed end, and the top of the arbor is turning toward the adjusting screw, CW.  This will make the blade attempt to tighten the nut when it bites into the wood.

Now if you turn the arbor around, still assuming that the adjusting screw is the feed end, the belt is still going to be going the same direction, from the blade's perspective won't the rotation be CCW instead of CW?  With a LH thread on the arbor won't the forces on the blade be trying to loosen the nut instead of tighten it?

I realize that this is "JUST" a model and will never see any of the forces of the real saw, but still it would seem to me that the arbor should have a LH thread on one side of the machine and a RH thread on the other.

Don

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #863 on: December 06, 2018, 09:27:30 PM »
Hi Don,

Thanks for coming back to me with your confusion. I apologize. I have custom built this saw. I am right handed and always have had the fence and the cross cut mitre on the left. So, without thinking, I have set the arbor with the blade on the right hand side of the table.

I've operated table saws for some time and always would want to put the push stick in my right hand and safely slide the work past the blade with the work being guided by the fence on the left,

Your post made me go back and have a close look at the drawings again. Yes, they have the mitre and the fence on the right with the blade on the left.

I'm reather glad my own preferences kicked in.

Thanks for sticking with me on this one.



Offline Larry Sw

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #864 on: December 06, 2018, 10:00:00 PM »
I worked in the Cabinet/Furniture making Trade for over 20 years before getting into
Computer Drafting and Design.  The Fence is always mounted to the right of the blade
unless you need it on the other side for blade tilt reasons.
Just look at a table saw with the extension table for sawing up sheet goods.
It's always to the right of the fence.

Larry S

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #865 on: December 06, 2018, 10:07:55 PM »
Hi Larry,

Exactly," The Fence is always mounted to the right of the blade unless you need it on the other side for blade tilt reasons"

That's why my fence is always o the left side of the blade.

John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #866 on: December 07, 2018, 01:25:15 PM »
I'm sure many have been sitting in the bushes waiting for me to discover the error of my ways with this saw. It's hard to teach an old dog new tricks.

These two photos of my trusty old Rockwell/Beaver right hand tilting table saw with its left extension has influenced my thinking with the model saw..

I never used the saw to crosscut with a fence in place, I use the mitre and want the cut -offs on my right, When I do rip or angle rip,( because the saw tips to the right), i've  always grabbed the fence and slid it onto the left side of the rails, I'm sure we will all agree, it is not a safe practice to tip a saw into a fence. So I just got into the habit of sliding the fence on the left side of the blade whether the blade was tipped or not.

Alas, this saw is not set up that way. Also, because there is a belt in the centre of the arbour under the table, the blade is not centered on the table,

I've messed up. However, I think I can reverse everything. The only problem will be the location of the drive pulley up on the lineshaft. I don't want to move the location of the saw and hope there is enough room to move the line shaft hanger to the front of the beam.

Back to the drawing board...

John

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #867 on: December 07, 2018, 04:48:17 PM »
I've messed up. However, I think I can reverse everything.
That's OK, you're entitled - once in a while.

You were probably thinking about how we do this now with modern equipment.  Not how they had to do it back in the day, with what they had.

Don

Offline derekwarner_decoy

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #868 on: December 07, 2018, 07:06:08 PM »
Could you always consider the saw was set up :Doh:  for a left handed sawer? ....... Derek
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
www.ils.org.au

Offline J.L.

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Back 'On Line'
« Reply #869 on: December 07, 2018, 07:36:49 PM »
Well, it seems Johhny has seen the error of his ways with this kit.

The bade has been mounted on the left, and the fence will be to its right. 

I was almost prepared to bull ahead stubbornly and go with what I had, but one look at the underside of the saw table showed me the casting was shaped with a recess for the saw blade on the left and the belt pulley, The table mounting trunnion are on the right.

I guess the old addage applies: "If all else fails, read the instructions."

Now for that saw table...

P.S. The saw table is also specifically cast for the location of the two grooves on each side of the saw opening . If you don't get the location of those grooves correct, the 1/16" groove depth will cut right through the table.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2018, 08:52:15 PM by J.L. »