Author Topic: Textile Mill Diorama  (Read 67277 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #810 on: November 14, 2018, 09:02:06 PM »
Thanks for sharing this great photo Steam Guy Willy. You can't beat a bandsaw for ripping large stock. I used one I made myself for cutting blanks for my wood lathe.

Hi Chris,
Great minds think alike. Before I poured the concrete floor in my shop, I made sure that there was a duplex receptical box mounted right in the centre of the room raised on a short piece of conduit. The table saw sits right over it and has its  power cord neatly tucked directly underneath. Like yours, you can walk right around the saw and have room to rip long stock.

Bill, I imagine this saw will be used mainly for crosscutting, but it will rip an 8' board the way it is sitting now.

No, the reason I questioned its position is that the lineshaft overhead will be running clockwise. Oops. Rahter than have to fuss with twisting the belt, I'll turn the saw around when its built and see if there is enough reaonable floorspace for its operation.

John
« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 04:14:04 PM by J.L. »

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #811 on: November 18, 2018, 04:18:38 PM »
There are still fellows out there who thoroughly enjoy working with hand woodworking tools and building modern versions of carpenter's benches used generations ago. Lee Valley in Canada sell modern versions of vices for wooden benches along with spring loaded bench dogs.

These photos show the construction of the front leg vice in a bench made of solid maple.


Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #812 on: November 19, 2018, 06:26:59 PM »
Laminating the top and making the sundry woodworking items completes the carpenter's workbench.

The metal brass dog will be painted black.


Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #813 on: November 19, 2018, 08:32:54 PM »
Awesome.  :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #814 on: November 19, 2018, 09:14:50 PM »
Very nice! The vises are slightly different, but I have one similar to that up in my wood shop.
 :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #815 on: November 19, 2018, 09:58:04 PM »
Thanks Carl and Chris.

Chris one version of the bench I like has a wooden vertical round holed  plate between the legs at the front. I wasn't sure how it would be used until I saw a picture of a woodworker planing the edge of a board. Apparently you clamp the board on its edge in the front vice and line the board up parallel with the top of the bench by positioning a peg in the vertical support below the board.

John

 

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #816 on: November 19, 2018, 10:43:45 PM »
Thanks Carl and Chris.

Chris one version of the bench I like has a wooden vertical round holed  plate between the legs at the front. I wasn't sure how it would be used until I saw a picture of a woodworker planing the edge of a board. Apparently you clamp the board on its edge in the front vice and line the board up parallel with the top of the bench by positioning a peg in the vertical support below the board.

John
Yes, thats what its for, very handy for planing edges of panels and doors.

Offline Johnmcc69

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #817 on: November 19, 2018, 10:53:52 PM »
Just fantastic work John!
 I really like those tiny hand planes & the bench turned out beautifully.

 John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #818 on: November 20, 2018, 04:09:20 PM »
Thanks John.

The lumber racks under the window have been loaded, Chris, you are a woodworker as well. Recognize the woods?

In the second photo, wood meets metal. You can see the engine's  flywheel and a line shaft pulley through the window.

P.S. Just noticed the pump handled oiler in the lower right pane as well.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 04:12:37 PM by J.L. »

Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #819 on: November 20, 2018, 05:15:14 PM »
...
The lumber racks under the window have been loaded, Chris, you are a woodworker as well. Recognize the woods?
...
Well, from the photo I would guess, top to bottom, maple, oak, and mahogany or paduak (color varies so much board to board)?

Offline J.L.

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #820 on: November 20, 2018, 05:59:10 PM »
Chris, you're good.

From top down:
hard maple
walnut (hard to see)
red oak
soft pine
basswood
padauk (one of my favourites)

« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 06:02:33 PM by J.L. »

Offline Roger B

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #821 on: November 20, 2018, 08:01:04 PM »
Still enjoying your wonderful attention to the fine details  :praise2:  :praise2: My wife came in whilst I was looking at the latest pictures and was fascinated by your work  :ThumbsUp:  :wine1:
Best regards

Roger

Offline J.L.

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The Table Saw
« Reply #822 on: November 21, 2018, 03:35:10 PM »
Thanks Roger. Taking the photos is as enjoyable as working up the parts.

It's time to get back to some metal.

I found chucking the table casting challenging. Two holes are required in-line for the spindle mandrel and the table top trunnions.

Offline RonGinger

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #823 on: November 21, 2018, 06:49:15 PM »
John, a few pages back you mentioned a photo book of your diorama and that Apple had changed its printing.

 I know there are on line services that will let you set  up a photo book, then sell them to the public. You would make some money off each one sold and would not have to be involved in any of the ordering or shipping. On example, Lulu.com will publish a 75 page color photo book to sell for $29.95. You make about $15 on each one sold.

If you make up such a book of this project I would be very quick to buy one.

I am a book lover, but also in awe of this diorama. I would love to have it on paper so I could thumb through it when I need inspiration to keep pressing on some project.

BTW- if Chris is reading this one Id buy a book of both the Lombard and the Marion.


Offline crueby

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Re: Textile Mill Diorama
« Reply #824 on: November 21, 2018, 07:55:59 PM »
John, a few pages back you mentioned a photo book of your diorama and that Apple had changed its printing.

 I know there are on line services that will let you set  up a photo book, then sell them to the public. You would make some money off each one sold and would not have to be involved in any of the ordering or shipping. On example, Lulu.com will publish a 75 page color photo book to sell for $29.95. You make about $15 on each one sold.

If you make up such a book of this project I would be very quick to buy one.

I am a book lover, but also in awe of this diorama. I would love to have it on paper so I could thumb through it when I need inspiration to keep pressing on some project.

BTW- if Chris is reading this one Id buy a book of both the Lombard and the Marion.
Hi Ron, yes, I am reading here - I have never looked into that kind of service before. The Lombard pics/text are being printed in Live Steam right now, they are planning on going to a book when the magazine serializing is complete, so I would think they might be upset if I printed elsewhere first. Same for the Marion, they want that one too. At the rates they are paying me, I will leave it up to them! Interesting idea though, may look into putting up my sets of portraits of the real machines.

Chris