Author Topic: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop  (Read 3564 times)

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2018, 01:57:52 PM »
Good eye, Ian.  That's exactly what this is, 16 Ga sheet steel.  And the 1/16" wall, 1" square tube.

Its proving to be quite the fun little project.  Not sure I'm ready to take up welding full time, but I'm certainly enjoying the learning process!

Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2018, 04:44:20 AM »
I did a little more work on the metal rack today.  Welded a few of the uprights into place.  I'll post pictures soon.

But mainly, I wanted to ask; what is the right pressure on the tank side for the Acetylene?   I felt like the Acetylene wasn't keeping a constant pressure and the flame would go up and down as I was welding. I seem to remember that the Acetylene tank pressure was pretty high, but I don't remember exactly what.  When I started today I checked and it was at 100psi.  But when I was finishing up it was just under 80psi.  I've never noticed it moving before and it makes me think that my Acetylene tank needs to be refilled.  Does that seem likely?

Kim
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 01:08:41 PM by Kim »

Online b.lindsey

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2018, 11:09:11 AM »
Kim, as long as the tank pressure exceeds the regulated pressure (3-5psi) you should be fine until the tank gets down to 10-15 psi. They are going to charge you the same whether they fill 20% of the tank or 90% so might as well get your money's worth.

Bill

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #18 on: March 12, 2018, 01:12:18 PM »
Thanks for the quick reply, Bill.  That saves me from disconnecting the tank and hauling it in to get filled today! 

This will be my first fill, when i get around to it!  :)

Kim

Online b.lindsey

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #19 on: March 12, 2018, 01:13:34 PM »
Actually they won't fill YOUR tank, they will just exchange it for a full one.

Bill

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2018, 02:01:23 AM »
Yes, of coures you're right, Bill  :D
Kim

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2018, 11:03:35 PM »
Kim, kinda late I know, but, at least I’m here  8). Man, 16ga. , that’s pretty thin and even reinforces my compliments. If your torch isn’t completely “popping out” to the point of having to relight it, watch for getting the tip too close to the puddle. This kinda causes a “pre detonation” scenario (which can be tinkered with by the gas pressure as Pete said ) For example: when using a large tip such as a rosebud, gas pressures have to be run at the max to keep the gas from “pre-igniting. On your scale, gas pressures have to be low, so pre-ignition is easier to make happen if you get the tip too “hot” . Also, watch for contaminates. The least bit of oil, solvent, or anything on the metal will cause a pop. You didn’t say what filler rod you are using, but, make sure you clean it also. I always gave my filler rod a few strokes with some emery cloth, pulled it under my armpit, across my shirt, and didn’t touch it with nothing but a clean bare hand afterwards. I never wear a glove on my “rod feeding” hand. Anyhoo, I’m envious of the rack cause I so desperately need one and yours is looking great  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp:. Now, think about the old guys in the body shop that replaced body panels by gas welding back in the day. I think it’s cool you’re doing it “old school “

Cletus

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #22 on: March 14, 2018, 04:20:42 AM »
Thanks for the help Eric!  I really appreciate it! :)
Many interesting points that I'll have to pay attention to next time out.

I am especially thinking of the tip getting too hot.  I used it for several hours and yes, the tip got quite hot.  And that's when I was getting more popping.  Also I think there were times that could be explained by getting "too close to the puddle" too.

I find it really interesting to watch the metal get hot, then melt.  Sometimes I even feel that I can cause it to mix around a little and make a better, more even weld.  And sometimes, It just seems to sit there with a hole in the middle of a big pile of molten metal and nothing seems to make it want to fill in that hole!  (and I don't mean putting a hole through the metal itself, though I've done that too! Then I fill it with more filler rod).

I'll have to be sure I'm cleaning the areas to weld too.  I did clean all the metal before I started, but that was weeks ago now.  And I can see that might have an affect too.

As for filler rod - I'll have to go check what it is.  It was stuff I got at Air Gas that said it was for standard carbon steel with gas welding. Seemed to match what I was doing.  I've got some 1/16" and some 3/32".  I don't notice a lot of difference other than I go thorough the 1/16" a faster than the 3/32" rods, as one would expect. :)

Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #23 on: March 14, 2018, 04:39:04 AM »
OK, just checked on the welding rod and here's what it says:

R60 (RG60)
Molly Alloyed High Strength
Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding Rod

R60 is a Moly alloyed, high strength, Oxyacetylene gas welding
rod sed for gas brazing of low carbon and low alloy steels. It
is used in applications where a high e=tensile strength is needed.
The high Silicon and Manganese content in the product
eliminates the need for flux when welding. A neutral flame
should be used.


So hopefully I got stuff that isn't too far off for my little learning project!

Keeping the rod clean is also a good point!
Thanks again Cletus!
Kim

Offline 10KPete

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #24 on: March 14, 2018, 05:14:28 AM »
Steel welding wire is named thusly:

E xx Sx

E70 means a filler that will yield a 70,000 psi deposit. The primary filler

S3 and S6 are the two levels of impurity removers. S6, having the most, is used for gas welding and dirty TIG. S3 is used for clean TIG.

So there.... :old:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2018, 09:26:02 PM »
Thanks for the info on welding rod Pete. I still have a lot to learn about welding!

Today I worked on the frame of the rack.

This picture shows the first set of uprights welded in place, and the second set clamped in place, ready for welding.  The top bar doesn't really go there.  It's just helping to maintain the spacing of the uprights.


Here’s a close up of my newby welding job.  Not perfect I’m sure, but I’m hoping it will hold.


Here I’ve rotated the base and have one of the sheet metal rack sections clamped in place, ready for the welding operation.


And here’s where I left off – with both metal rack sections welded in place.


I still have little 4” spacer pieces to weld in place for the sheetmetal slots, but it started raining, so I decided that was a sign that I was done for the day.

After those spacers I need to weld up the sloping part of the frame and dividers for the bar stock section.  And put the castors on.  I'm getting closer!

On the welding front, I’m getting a lot less popping now.  I think all the suggestions you all gave me have really helped.  And the Acetylene pressure is now down to 60lbs.  It seems to go down fast close to the end of the tank. I’m hoping I don’t run out tomorrow!  Air Gas isn’t open till Monday!  :o

Kim

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2018, 11:25:57 PM »
You are making great progress on the stock rack Kim.
It's looking good!


Dave

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2018, 04:49:16 AM »
Thanks Dave!

Once I finish this up, I'm going to do a quick tidy of the shop and then get back to my steam tractor!

I've got a water pump to make so I can hydro test my boiler.  :)

Thanks,
Kim

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #28 on: March 25, 2018, 04:34:14 PM »
This week, on as the Metal Racks Churns, Kim completes the frame and starts welding in the section dividers for the Bar Stock section.

Here’s the last of the main frame all welded up:


Welding the 1/8”x1/2” bars into place isn’t too hard, but I have to clamp each intersection together before I weld it.  The heat bends the bars all which-way!


All the lower layer dividers in place, starting on the upper section:


Thanks for taking a look.
Kim
« Last Edit: April 03, 2018, 02:14:11 AM by Kim »

Offline Kim

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Re: A new little Metal Rack for the Shop
« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2018, 02:46:51 PM »
This weekend, I completed the metal rack!

I finished up the upper dividers.  I used vicegrips to hold the cross points together while welding.


Then I flipped it over and started to weld the castors to the bottom.


Turns out, welding the castors on was actually a bad idea.  The grease in the bearings melted and ran all over the place :(  Plus, if I ever wanted to replace or repurpose those castors, It would be a bear to get them off.

So, I switched to bolting them on.  A much more sensible idea anyway.   I used the castors as templates and drilled holes for some 1/4"-20 hardware.   I bolted them through the base and the frame.  I only used 3 bolts.  I decided not to connect it to just the base sheet on the inside.


And here’s the first one mounted with bolts.


And here we are, all castors in place!


And flipping it over, with the business side up, here’s my completed, mobile rack!


Then I filled it up with all my bar and sheet stock.  Looks like it does the job!


Unfortunately, I still have quite a bit of really short pieces (less than 12”) that just didn’t work in this unit.  It wouldn’t stay up where I wanted it.  So I’m going to have to find another solution for all of these bits.




Anyway, thus ends the saga of Kim’s metal rack.

As always, thanks to all of you, I learned a lot along the way!
Thanks,
Kim