Author Topic: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel  (Read 308681 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #750 on: February 26, 2018, 02:15:32 AM »
Sounds like they have a lot going on! If you hear of a date for the steam weekend this year, I'd love to know, would be great to see it, and would definitely take the model.

Offline steamboatmodel

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #751 on: February 26, 2018, 06:14:44 PM »
Hi Chris, Have you looked into the 344 MHz radios? I have been following ScratchbuildwithJohn on Utube, He is in Australia and using 433 MHz with his sub.
Gerald.
Have not heard of the 344 band, brings up two questions:
-are they still being made?
-are they legal in the US? Things do vary by country.
Okay, 3 questions, who makes them?
Some in our club with ham license use 53 mhz, think it is.
Hi Chris,
the information I know I got from U-tube watching ScratchbuildwithJohn. He is using a add-on unit from one of the Chinese sellers (maybe Hobby King) which fits on the back of his radio transmitter replacing the RF from the radio with a 433MHz band transceiver. One of the links he gave listed the legal frequencies and for Canada and USA they listed 344MHz. I think that most of the equipment he is using is from Hobby King or Bangood. As to whether it requires an Ham license I don't know.
Gerald.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors--and miss. Lazarus Long

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #752 on: February 26, 2018, 06:23:42 PM »
Hi Chris, Have you looked into the 344 MHz radios? I have been following ScratchbuildwithJohn on Utube, He is in Australia and using 433 MHz with his sub.
Gerald.
Have not heard of the 344 band, brings up two questions:
-are they still being made?
-are they legal in the US? Things do vary by country.
Okay, 3 questions, who makes them?
Some in our club with ham license use 53 mhz, think it is.
Hi Chris,
the information I know I got from U-tube watching ScratchbuildwithJohn. He is using a add-on unit from one of the Chinese sellers (maybe Hobby King) which fits on the back of his radio transmitter replacing the RF from the radio with a 433MHz band transceiver. One of the links he gave listed the legal frequencies and for Canada and USA they listed 344MHz. I think that most of the equipment he is using is from Hobby King or Bangood. As to whether it requires an Ham license I don't know.
Gerald.
Thanks for the info - we are having a run at the Y pool this weekend, I'll ask our resident radio gurus (Don & Patti) about it!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #753 on: February 26, 2018, 08:20:48 PM »
Okay, back in the shop on the Marion build again!   :whoohoo:

The current set of parts is for the large pulley that holds the top of the yoke on the dipper bucket, and takes the main hoist chain. I had previously made the sheave, and am continuing on with the shell.

Here is the original:

Fabrication started with rough cutting out the two side plates from some thin steel flat stock and taking them close to shape on the belt sander. Then, clamping them together to drill the hole for the main axle of the sheave, then a pair of close-fit 5-40 clearance holes .550" out from that hole. The second two holes will act as hold-downs on the milling plate, and will be hidden in the final assembly by the side straps.

Then, a piece of aluminum bar, which had been used to make cylinder caps in a previous model, was dug out of the spare parts bin and clamped up in the 4-jaw chuck. Center drilled a hole in it on the lathe to give a centering aid, and moved the chuck and part over to the rotary table. You can see a set of other holes in the plates, they were from the other model.

Now, I was going to just use the tooling plate on the rotary table, but these plates need a number of arcs with different center points as well as angled straight lines, so a dedicated fixture was better. So, using the center hole as a guide, the rotary table was centered under the mill head, and the handwheels zeroed to that. With the table turned so that the chuck jaws were at a 45 degree angle to the axis of the mill table, to keep the drilled holes to come away from the jaws, I drilled holes .550" out from the center on the X axis to match the ones in the side plates. Then, moved the mill table left .095 and in .1824, and used that as a starting point for a second set of holes, used for the arc down one side of the plates. Last, moved the table back out double the .1824 and drilled a third set to be used to mill the second arc. These holes are the ones with the blue lines connecting them. With the plates bolted to the center set, the plates are centered on the rotary table. With them bolted to either side set, they are positioned to mill the side arcs.

So, bolted the plates on one side, with the bottom of the plates away from the original 'left' offset, made a note of the angle setting on the rotary table for later reference, and milled the arc on one side till it went tangent to the edge of the plate (the bar stock was 2" wide, which matched the width of the part).

Then, moved the plates over to the other side holes, and milled the second arc:

With the two arcs done, the plates were moved back to the center holes, the rotary table turned so the parts were perpendicular to the mill table, and the straight bottom edge was milled in to dimension.

That just left the two upper sides to mill, at a 45 degree angle:

Here are the parts so far:

The brass block on the right will become the spacer between the plates, the outside will be milled like the side plates were, then I'll cut out the center part to leave a narrow three sided strip that will get riveted to the side plates later on. I thought about bending this from bar stock, but since it needs two specific arcs, a straight center, and sharp corners between,  and has to be accurate and stright enough to sit flat between the plates, I am more confident in milling it out rather than bending it.

Good to be back on the Marion project again, the sub is to the point where I am doing background glueing of parts and small assemblies, its machine shop time should be done.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:02:50 PM by crueby »

Offline steamboatmodel

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #754 on: February 27, 2018, 02:20:44 PM »
Great work on that. Do you have digital readouts on your mill. I get watching and enjoying the write-up and photos and then there is a shot that reminds me that this is a small Sherline you are doing it on, fantastic.
Gerald.
Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors--and miss. Lazarus Long

Offline J.L.

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #755 on: February 27, 2018, 02:23:29 PM »
Hi Chris,
Beautiful sequential photography here!  :ThumbsUp:
John

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #756 on: February 27, 2018, 03:42:59 PM »
Great work on that. Do you have digital readouts on your mill. I get watching and enjoying the write-up and photos and then there is a shot that reminds me that this is a small Sherline you are doing it on, fantastic.
Gerald.
Nope, no DRO or CNC, do have zero resettable handwheels.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #757 on: February 27, 2018, 03:43:28 PM »
Hi Chris,
Beautiful sequential photography here!  :ThumbsUp:
John
Thanks John!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #758 on: February 27, 2018, 07:11:07 PM »
More on the chain pulley parts, used the same setup as for the outer plates to mill the profiles into the brass for the bottom spacer:

and then to drill the rivet holes around the edge, with the plates stacked in place with the spacer:

Then milled in the inner slot along the bottom edge:

The hold down bolt prevented me from milling all the way across the bottom, so the last bit was sawn out then cleaned up in the mill vise:

and the family of parts for the pulley so far:

Next up is to make the side straps. Once those are riveted in place, I can rivet the assembly together. To get the sheave to turn more easily, I am thinking of making a small slip-on set of bearings for the axles, just a thin tube of bronze should do it.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:02:59 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #759 on: February 27, 2018, 10:34:19 PM »
Got a start on the side straps this afternoon. They take the weight of the bucket from the chain, and also hole the sheave axle centered in the side plates. The tricky bit with them was to make the double sets of bends in the center, where they bump out for the sheave axle. So, not having a bending brake, I designed up a little bending jig to do that job.
Started by laying out the bend points on the steel flat stock, and bending the two outer 45 degree bends, first one side:

then the other:

Here comes the bending jig, which will keep the first bend from getting bent back out again - two bits of square stock, with some recesses to hold on the tops of the jaws and a 45-degree angled bit to hold the stock. Here is the bar clamped in place:

Then took a pair of long-nose pliers and worked the center back up vertical:

Thats one side done, turned the part over, and bent it too:

Presto, one side strap, ready to start drilling its holes for the axle and rivets. Ends get rounded as well.

It only took two tries to get the dimensions of the fixture correct, the first time the hook end was a little too long, making the center section too high - I had assumed it would bend back to the end of the hook, needed to allow a little radius there.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:03:06 PM by crueby »

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #760 on: February 28, 2018, 12:45:38 AM »
Very nice Chris. Good to see you back on it.

Bill

Offline bouch

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #761 on: February 28, 2018, 02:42:34 PM »
Sounds like they have a lot going on! If you hear of a date for the steam weekend this year, I'd love to know, would be great to see it, and would definitely take the model.

This just came down the wire...

"Toot Toot It's #WayBackWednesday! How did 30 years go by so fast!? Mark your calendar now for our 60th Anniversary celebration September 15 & 16 2018"   (the "30 years" is in reference to a photo they had of a ribbon from their 1st "Steam weekend", which was their 30th anniversary celebration.)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #762 on: February 28, 2018, 02:50:39 PM »
Sounds like they have a lot going on! If you hear of a date for the steam weekend this year, I'd love to know, would be great to see it, and would definitely take the model.

This just came down the wire...

"Toot Toot It's #WayBackWednesday! How did 30 years go by so fast!? Mark your calendar now for our 60th Anniversary celebration September 15 & 16 2018"   (the "30 years" is in reference to a photo they had of a ribbon from their 1st "Steam weekend", which was their 30th anniversary celebration.)

Excellent!!! Thanks!  Just went and looked at their website, and found this on the events page:
--------------------------------------
WHITE MOUNTAIN CENTRAL RAILROAD DAYS
Wolfman

Celebrate 60 years of riding the rails
September 15 & 16, 2018

Revel in the rich history of railroading with special excursions on the White Mountain Central Railroad. Rail fans can ride steam locomotives and see rare and unique equipment on display.

The Baldwin, Climax and Porter steam locomotives and a GE 65-ton diesel engine will be in operation on this spectacular weekend celebrating 60 years of riding the rails on the White Mountain Central Railroad. To join in the fun of Railroad Days, guests must purchase a general admission ticket at the railroad station. Tickets are $22 for ages 4-64 and $20 for ages 65 and up. Each ticket includes all the Railroad Days events, the bear show, train rides, plus all the rides and attractions Clark's has to offer.
More details for Railroad Days will be coming soon.
--------------------------------
Sent them an email asking about the Lombard as well, thanks again for the tip!
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 03:02:13 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #763 on: February 28, 2018, 03:05:31 PM »
This morning I got the side straps drilled and the ends trimmed off, here are the parts so far:

Then made up the cross pins:

After lunch I'll get some rivet pins in place to align things temporarily, clamp it together, and drill for the rivets to hold the straps to the side plates...
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:03:24 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #764 on: February 28, 2018, 06:38:02 PM »
After lunch I started drilling holes for the rivets to hold the side straps on. With the assembly lined up and held with some clamps, holding it for drilling looked difficult. Then remembered I had a 1" mill vise that followed me home from Cabin Fever this winter, clamped the parts in that, and clamped that vertically in the mill vise - worked great. With that setup, I drilled through the top and bottom plates/straps in one go, for the outer holes.

The inner holes were blocked by the sheave, so I riveted on the straps with the first four holes, then went back and drilled the rest with the plates seperately.

After test fitting the sheave would spin freely (took a few swipes with a file to square it up), the whole assembly was riveted together, using some small brass rod through the plates.

And here it is with the chain fed through, as it will hang in the model. Next up is to cross drill the axles for the cotter pins, and then make the U-shaped clevises that attach it to the yoke and to the end of the chain - there are two sheaves on the end of the boom, one in the pulley, so the chain ends at the top of the pulley.

« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:03:30 PM by crueby »