Author Topic: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel  (Read 318238 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #810 on: March 06, 2018, 02:13:22 PM »
Fantastic.  :ThumbsUp:
 
Now, you need a giant squid.  :Jester:

ShopShoe
Now that would be some interesting linkages!  :Lol:


Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #811 on: March 06, 2018, 02:59:30 PM »
Getting caught up on work from yesterday, I got started on the top plate on the plate which holds the slider portion of the dipper yoke block. Here is an image from their catalog of one, I think from a different model shovel since the details dont match:

While similar, here is what the top plate on this shovel looks like:

In both those pictures you can see there is a small bar in the center, held on a post with a cotter. That appears to be a retainer to keep the bolts from turning, not sure if they used that to adjust the tension on the dipper boom to keep the gear mesh proper while things wore - there is a bearing plate underneath where it rides on the top of the boom, makes sense that they would want a way to take up the slack as that wore.
EDIT: looking through the catalogs I have, found a sentance where Marion states they would put shim plates in to keep things in contact as they block and boom surfaces wore. They also call this either a yoke block or a saddle block - they used both terms in one sentence, must be a regional term.

I started with a piece of 1/4" thick stainless flat bar, trimmed to width/length, and started hogging in the large areas around the ribs on top with a large end mill.

Then came back and fined in the corners and thickness of the ribs with a smaller one:

Today I will cut the narrow rib space in the center, and start notching in the shapes on top of the ribs.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:07:11 PM by crueby »

Online mklotz

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #812 on: March 06, 2018, 03:10:43 PM »
You should convince the researchers at Woods Hole that they need turtles like yours to surreptitiously track sea turtles.  Then sell them for $50K a copy;  institutions are always paying sucker prices for specialty equipment.  For an extra $10K mount a GoPro in the head so they can take pictures of the wildlife they annoy.
---
Regards, Marv


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Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #813 on: March 06, 2018, 03:19:48 PM »
You should convince the researchers at Woods Hole that they need turtles like yours to surreptitiously track sea turtles.  Then sell them for $50K a copy;  institutions are always paying sucker prices for specialty equipment.  For an extra $10K mount a GoPro in the head so they can take pictures of the wildlife they annoy.
I wish I could claim it as my idea - I got the idea for this sub from the series of shows on PBS (Nature - Spy In The Wild miniseries) where they did exactly that, made RC animals to put cameras in, so they could interact with wild animals with no humans around. They did a number of them, the turtle (which watched other turtles, whales, dolphins), a monkey, birds standing on the ground (to watch elephant herds), things like that. They put cameras in the eye sockets of the 'animals', very cool stuff.
Once I saw the show, I went "gotta build one of those!".
You can watch those episodes on Nature's website here:
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/spy-in-the-wild-about/14810/

Offline b.lindsey

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #814 on: March 06, 2018, 03:26:50 PM »
I have also seen them mount small video cameras to live animals for the same purpose...as I recall it was penguins so that they could see what they were doing under the antarctic ice in searching for food. Either way its an ingenious idea.

Bill

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #815 on: March 06, 2018, 04:13:56 PM »
Hi Chris,   saw this in the Engineer.....A contemporainious photo from 1890....

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #816 on: March 06, 2018, 04:56:18 PM »
I have also seen them mount small video cameras to live animals for the same purpose...as I recall it was penguins so that they could see what they were doing under the antarctic ice in searching for food. Either way its an ingenious idea.

Bill
They got some great footage that way. There was another Nature series, Animals With Cameras, on recently where they did that. They had a lot of fun getting the cameras on little harnesses on some of the animals. I think it was a chimp that pulled on it and demolished the rig in seconds.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #817 on: March 06, 2018, 04:57:31 PM »
Hi Chris,   saw this in the Engineer.....A contemporainious photo from 1890....
Great photo! That was one of the ones that did not use a crowd engine, but just had the dipper boom hinged on the main boom. There were half a dozen variations on that theme over the years. Thanks!

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #818 on: March 06, 2018, 05:01:20 PM »
More on the top plate - milled the smaller center area out, and took the tops of the ribs down in the center, also notched for the retaining bar.

Then tipped it 45 degrees to do the angles at the sides

and a shallower angle for the other ribs

and drilled the hole for the center post for the cotter, and the outside holes for the through bolts

and lastly took the bottom down to final thickness

Here it is set on the dipper boom where it will go:

I think I will put it in the tumbler for a little while to even out the tool marks from the mill, then get started on the bearing plates.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:07:27 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #819 on: March 07, 2018, 02:26:05 PM »
Next up was the bronze bearing plates, which ride on top of the dipper booms. I started by squaring up a length of bronze rod, and hacksawing it down the middle to split it into two plates. On the original, they are bolted onto the steel top plate, so I figured I'd give it a try to do the same thing. Since the scaled down plates are so thin, I did not want to depend on just a turn or two of the thread, so I drilled/tapped the holes 2-56, then silver soldered in a bolt in each hole, bolt head to the bottom. The bolt heads were then sawn off.

At this point, the surface against the steel plate is the milled-flat outside of the original bar, the outer surface is the rough sawn side, that still needs to be taken down to final dimensions. So, I bolted the plates together:

and took several light cuts to smooth the bottom surface and take the bearing plates to final thickness:

Here it is set on the boom, you can see how the bronze plates are the same width as the tops of the booms.

And then I drilled and added the little post for the cotter pin to hold the retaining plate.

Next step is to measure for geear mesh and trim the vertical bar to length, then add the bearings to the end. Got to be precise on that one, so it, um, measure once, cut twice, still too short.... No, thats not it... Hmmm...
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:07:36 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #820 on: March 07, 2018, 08:13:06 PM »
Some careful measurements with the gear and post, and trimmed the vertical post to what should be a good length to get a proper mesh on the gear, plus a slight extra length to allow for fine tuning (can trim a bit off the top of the post if the fit is too loose). Then, clamped on a block of scrap so I could drill the hole for the bronze bearing for the shaft:

The bearing cap is steel, so to get a matching hole in the steel blank I used another piece to drill with, so that both sides of the hole were drilled with the same metal to keep the drill from wandering out into a softer side. The second piece could be used as a spare cap if I botch the first one.

Here are the parts so far:

I then rounded the ends and top of the cap the same way that I did for the post the other day, post #792, using a rod in the hole as a height guide on the top of the mill vise, and made cuts at several angles to rough in the curve. Also drilled and turned a piece of bronze rod for the bearing. Here are all the parts for the assembly so far:

Now, need to make up the through-bolts from some 1/8" round bar, threaded at both ends, and the nuts to hold it all together. Then I can check the fit on the gears, and trim or shim as needed for a good sliding fit on the booms. Good place to stop for the day!
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:07:44 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #821 on: March 07, 2018, 10:46:07 PM »
This afternoon I made up the two studs for the yoke, just some 1/8" rod threaded at each end. Also needed a set of heavy nuts for them, so I repeated the method I used for the nus on the booms, and threaded a set of 5-40 nuts onto a bolt, tightened them down to the head of the bolt, and screwed that into the end of a rod held in a 5C collet in the hex collet holder. Here is what I started with, full size hardware-store pattern nuts (quite huge for a model).

A few passes on each face, turn the collet one face in the vise, repeat 6 times, and I got a set of heavy nuts for the model, no drilling, threading time needed, only took a few minutes.

Then, time for a test of the gear mesh on the dipper handle:



Looks like I got the length of the post right on the first go, it moves nice and smooth, good contact all the way up and down the rack.
 :whoohoo:
So, time for a bit of paint on these new parts (none on the bronze plates or the sides of the vert post), and the dipper handle assembly is complete!
 :cartwheel:

Next steps? Have not decided whether to make the gears that will go to the crowd engine (one large wheel that goes on the outside of this shaft, one small one that goes on the crankshaft of the engine), or start on the main boom parts.

Time for a cookie and a relaxed ponder... (we need a emoji of sitting in a rocker eating a cookie)
 :cheers:
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 09:07:50 PM by crueby »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #822 on: March 08, 2018, 02:07:27 AM »
......

Next steps? Have not decided whether to make the gears that will go to the crowd engine (one large wheel that goes on the outside of this shaft, one small one that goes on the crankshaft of the engine), or start on the main boom parts.

.....
Decided to go with making the gears on the shipper shaft (thats what they call the shaft on the parts I just made)...

Online sco

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #823 on: March 08, 2018, 06:02:23 AM »
Really slick work turning out these tricky parts Chris!  Still following this build and enjoying the aquatic distractions too,

Simon.
Ars longa, vita brevis.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #824 on: March 08, 2018, 02:27:00 PM »
......

Next steps? Have not decided whether to make the gears that will go to the crowd engine (one large wheel that goes on the outside of this shaft, one small one that goes on the crankshaft of the engine), or start on the main boom parts.

.....
Decided to go with making the gears on the shipper shaft (thats what they call the shaft on the parts I just made)...
Correction - turns out I don't have any stock large enough for those gears (they are 3.5" diameter, .25" thick), so I'll have to order some. So, in the meantime, guess I'll start shaping down the sides for the main booms.