Author Topic: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel  (Read 289624 times)

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3870 on: May 14, 2019, 11:25:02 PM »
Got the c-shaped rails for the wall studs and ceiling frames cut down from rectangular stock (only off the shelf stuff I can find is either too thin or way too big). With a little guide block clamped in the vise to hold the stock in place for the slitting saw, it went pretty smoothly. The guide block holds it on three sides, and just wraps around the front face, leaving it able to slide through.

It took several passes to get the full width and depth of the cut - fed the stock in from the back right of the blade so that it was going against the teeth, like a table saw. Used a pair of pliers to grab the stock on the left and pull it through (was just a bit too warm to pull with fingers comfortably). Very neccessary to have one hand or the other holding at all times or the blade wanted to shoot it back out the right side again.
After several passes on all pieces, now have quite a pile of C-channel to start cutting down for the cab framework...



Offline cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3871 on: May 15, 2019, 02:18:59 AM »


BAD PUN ALERT                         BAD PUN ALERT                 BAD PUN ALERT                      BAD PUN ALERT 

         I  'C' what you mean.......

(sorry, I'll get my coat.....)









Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3872 on: May 15, 2019, 02:20:48 AM »


BAD PUN ALERT                         BAD PUN ALERT                 BAD PUN ALERT                      BAD PUN ALERT 

         I  'C' what you mean.......

(sorry, I'll get my coat.....)


 :facepalm2:


C you later ..  >:D

Offline J.L.

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3873 on: May 15, 2019, 06:42:43 PM »
Two-thirds of a bad pun is phew.  :facepalm2:

Chris, this build will go down in history. I believe it will be serialized in an engineering magazine?

John

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3874 on: May 15, 2019, 08:17:11 PM »
Two-thirds of a bad pun is phew.  :facepalm2:

Chris, this build will go down in history. I believe it will be serialized in an engineering magazine?

John
Hi John,

As long as we pun-dits  ;D dont get too out of control, yes the same magazine serializing the Lombard build, Live Steam/Outdoor Railroading, wants to run this one once the Lombard series finishes around the end of the year. Possible each will be collected in book form too after each magazine run is complete. I recently sent the editor the first draft of the Marion articles/photos/plans, minus the last few chapters still in construction. Lots of work, but very rewarding.

Chris
 :cheers:

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3875 on: May 15, 2019, 10:56:02 PM »
Last week I got a tip on these fittings, made for connecting tubing. They are already the basic shape that I was making for the steam pipes, just with the barbs sticking out:

So, I ordered some to see how they would work out. The center sections are identical in size/shape to the larger ones I made for the hoist engine pipework - could be cut/drilled for the pipe very quickly, saving a lot of steps. The only drawback is that the smaller sizes have the same size center section, was hoping they would scale the whole thing down. They cost around $1.50 to $180, and are manufactured by Dixon - they also have Tee's to match. If you search for 'Dixon Brass Fittings Barbed Hose Splicers' you will find them.

Offline derekwarner

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3876 on: May 16, 2019, 12:14:30 AM »
The only practical disadvantage I see with these forged body elbows and tees, is the physical mass of the body.......in model steam work, the mass can be a huge heat  :Mad: soak yes in both inlet and exhaust steam


Die formed capillary copper elbows and tees are available for either silver, or soft soldering....and in both long and short radius [for the elbows]

The mass is approximately 30% of the forged brass bodies of the corresponding size

The example sizing below is for 1/4" OD tube x 0.038" wall thickness....

Derek
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 12:30:59 AM by derekwarner »
Derek Warner - Honorary Secretary [Retired]
Illawarra Live Steamers Co-op - Australia
www.ils.org.au

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3877 on: May 16, 2019, 12:42:27 AM »
Good points Derek! I have not seen the short radius ones here, will have to look for them.   :cheers:

Offline gary.a.ayres

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3878 on: May 16, 2019, 06:38:11 AM »
And we are there! After 3-1/2 months working on the slew/crowd engines, the second one is in place and ready for shakedown test!

 :whoohoo:

 :DrinkPint:

This is just amazing...!  :cheers:

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3879 on: May 17, 2019, 12:45:23 AM »
Thanks Gary!

Bit of a side-trip today, got all the things I needed to try making the etched name plates myself given that the supplier I had been using cancelled the order after two months of waiting (grrrr....)


Dave Otto showed in an earlier post about using PCB etching materials to make nameplates - that looked great, so I figured I would give it a try. I ordered some of the transfer paper from Techniks.com, and got some etching acid too - used my new toner-based printer (wont work with inkjet) and made up a sheet of images for both the Lombard and the Marion plates I need - figured testing with the Lombard plate would let me compare the results directly with the ones I bought previously from said supplier.
Here is the plate just after transfering the image with an iron:
And after etching:

That copper plate is just 0.688" in diameter - the detail is pretty good, not bad for a first attempt with a new (to me) process! I have the plates for the Marion in etching right now - there are a number of small ones, put them on two larger plates and will cut them apart later.

Thanks Dave!!   :cheers:

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3880 on: May 17, 2019, 12:51:13 AM »
Great result Chris! that plate looks terrific - nice deep relief on the letters.  :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :ThumbsUp: :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn:

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3881 on: May 17, 2019, 01:01:20 AM »
Very nice Chris!

I have some notes somewhere on how to get good results, but it looks like you are having no problem. Having the blank sanded and super clean is very important; also getting everything up to the proper temp to transfer the toner onto the metal is important. You can use a Sharpie to fill in any little spots that may have stuck properly.

I would set the blank on some folded paper towel with a very fine wire thermocouple under the blank. Then a some cardboard from the back of a notepad between the Press-n-peal to iron on. Using the point of the iron I work it around in small circles and monitor the temp to make sure it gets hot enough. Then cool it down in cold water before removing the backing.

How you position the blank in the etch and also how you agitate it will give varying results. There is a bit of a learning curve to figure out what works best.

Congrats it looks great!

Dave

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3882 on: May 17, 2019, 01:07:22 AM »
Very nice Chris!

I have some notes somewhere on how to get good results, but it looks like you are having no problem. Having the blank sanded and super clean is very important; also getting everything up to the proper temp to transfer the toner onto the metal is important. You can use a Sharpie to fill in any little spots that may have stuck properly.

I would set the blank on some folded paper towel with a very fine wire thermocouple under the blank. Then a some cardboard from the back of a notepad between the Press-n-peal to iron on. Using the point of the iron I work it around in small circles and monitor the temp to make sure it gets hot enough. Then cool it down in cold water before removing the backing.

How you position the blank in the etch and also how you agitate it will give varying results. There is a bit of a learning curve to figure out what works best.

Congrats it looks great!

Dave
Good tips! I figured out some of them - wound up bending the corners of the plate so I could put it in the etchant face down and keep the residue from collecting, also gave a way to pick the thing up again with some copper tweezers. From what I have read, warming the solution will speed it up, but I figure cool and slow is safer for a beginner! I found the iron I have, on the Cotton Blend setting, got the plate hot enough to do the transfer fine - one time a section did not stick, so just cleaned it all off and did another try. Since it uses up a whole sheet of the paper to print it, figured I would just replicate the images down the page and have plenty of tries, that worked out fine since I did use several. Tried some on brass, that works too, but seems to etch slower. Also tried a vinegar/peroxide/salt solution I found online, that works too, is a lot cheaper, but is half the speed. I dont want to try any of the nastier acids, this stuff is acceptable with care.
Interesting that sharpie would work, would have thought the acid would clean it right off?

Offline Dave Otto

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3883 on: May 17, 2019, 01:17:24 AM »
When I tape up the back of the plate I have added a strip of tape to use as a handle. Good idea on bending the corners down, keeping the swarf clear really helps the process.

Dave

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #3884 on: May 17, 2019, 01:27:16 AM »
When I tape up the back of the plate I have added a strip of tape to use as a handle. Good idea on bending the corners down, keeping the swarf clear really helps the process.

Dave
I like the tape-handle idea! The corners help, but the tape could be left long enough to see at the surface.