Author Topic: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel  (Read 318657 times)

Offline Jasonb

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #375 on: December 20, 2017, 06:58:20 PM »
The Gun Kote is a paint, I think it is 2hrs bake at 350 or 3hrs at the lower temp I mentioned.

I get away with baking the exhaust paint for the hit & miss engines in the oven at home :) Does not seem to taint the food the next time the oven is used

Don't worry about the metal or paint on the M&Ms its the taste of all that steam oil and coal smuts that will be flying about that you need to think about :-[

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #376 on: December 20, 2017, 07:13:22 PM »
Chris, there used to be a product (if forget the brand name) but it was called stove polish. If you can find an old mom and pop type hardware store they might have some. Its a very flat black though and I guess, as the name implies, it was used to refurbish old wood burning pot bellied stoves and kitchen stoves/ovens as well. Just a thought.

Bill

Edit: The picture below is what I remember. It has probably been replaced by more modern versions though.
At Mom&Pop hardware stores? Wow, none of those left around here, unfortunately, the last of them retired off two years ago, the big box stores killed off most of them a long time ago. My mom shops at Amazon a lot now...  :Lol:

I looked up the stove polishes, they are still made, and are a black pigment in a wax base, only sticks on unpainted areas, and is not really meant for high friction areas.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #377 on: December 20, 2017, 07:17:48 PM »
The Gun Kote is a paint, I think it is 2hrs bake at 350 or 3hrs at the lower temp I mentioned.

I get away with baking the exhaust paint for the hit & miss engines in the oven at home :) Does not seem to taint the food the next time the oven is used

Don't worry about the metal or paint on the M&Ms its the taste of all that steam oil and coal smuts that will be flying about that you need to think about :-[
Yes, it is a paint, Brownells carries a version of it in spray cans that looks quite nice.

For this use, I think I'll be sticking with the spray paint solution, I've found the Duplicolor flat black auto lacquers cover very well, and take a touch-up spritz nicely - been using it on some of my RC subs, which when we show at shallow pools tend to get the strip along the bottom of the bow scraped on the bottom of the pool, that paint goes on very thin and retouches easily. They have a gray/black metallic that goes on kind of translucent, but when put on over the flat black it gives a cast-iron look that I like. Its what I used on the Lombard boiler nameplate (the full size one).

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #378 on: December 21, 2017, 07:30:21 PM »
Back on the steam shovel today, but first a side-track for the current state of the sea-turtle submarine project, since some of you asked to be kept up to date on it. I have finished carving and seal coats on the masters for the molds, going to let them set up a couple of days (the rubber mold compounds don't like freshly sealed surfaces, sometimes can cause curing issues, so better safe than sorry). The main shell and the front of the head will be cast as seperate top/bottom pieces in fiberglass, while the neck/flippers/tail will be cast in a flexible platinum-cure silicone rubber so that they can flex with the underlying cable-driven mechanism, so they look realistic rather than having obvious hinge points. The skeletal structure of a sea turtle flipper looks a lot like a stretched out version of your hand, lots of short bones, rather than a long bone/joint like your leg.
Here are the wood mold masters so far:

and a close up, showing the textured skin surface, mimicing what the real turtle has - looks like a combination of fish scales and skin. I am using mold compounds and rubber casting material from Smooth-On, using their platinum-cure line which is a two-part silicone rubber, unlike the bathroom-caulk type of silicone you get at the hardware store which is single part and cures by outgassing acetic acid. They have versions for making the molds, and more flexible ones used commonly in movie makeup, including ones you can mix in pigments to paint on colors. Clever stuff. Expensive, but very good.

The red color you can see in places on the shell is the auto body filler I used to smooth out some of the glue seams and other dings/scratches left from the carving.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 08:40:54 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #379 on: December 21, 2017, 07:36:07 PM »
Okay, back to the steam shovel build. The next parts up are the brackets that hold the large pivot pins which will hold the yoke that the bucket hangs from. I am making these out of some 303 stainless steel, had a block of that the right width/thickness, so I cut off two narrow strips and squared up the sides to size on the mill:

then cut in the notch that will leave space for the yoke at the top (this section will get more shaping later)

then turned them over (doing each operation on both parts before going on to the next step) and cut in the slots on the lower end.

Got that done on one part, need to do likewise on the other, then will trim the ribs sticking up at an angle. Here is where this is going - the brackets are in the middle/upper area on the sides of the bucket, and will be riveted in place:


« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 08:41:01 PM by crueby »

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #380 on: December 21, 2017, 09:42:32 PM »
Next step on the brackets was to recess the edge,

and then taper the ribs down to the lower level

followed by laying out and drilling the pivot pin hole (indexed off the top corner at the edge of the vise, to get both the same quickly)

then mill the slot and side arcs at the same recess level as in the first step:

That is a good breaking point for the day. The top end of the brackets need to be rounded over, will set up the rotary table to do that next time. Then with same setup, will use a 1/4-rounding bit to radius the top edges. In the meantime, here is the part set in place on the bucket:

« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 08:41:08 PM by crueby »

Online Kim

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #381 on: December 22, 2017, 06:40:11 AM »
Nice work on the turtle there, Chris!

And the Bucket Bracket looks mighty fine too.  I really like how it's turning out!
Kim

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #382 on: December 22, 2017, 05:57:14 PM »
Nice work on the turtle there, Chris!

And the Bucket Bracket looks mighty fine too.  I really like how it's turning out!
Kim
Thanks Kim, I hope both wind up working well!

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #383 on: December 22, 2017, 06:08:00 PM »
Next step on the dipper bucket, finishing and attaching the yoke brackets. I went back and forth on how to hold the brackets to round the ends about the pivot pins, decided on this approach. I took a short offcut from a sail-track extrusion that was in the scrap bin (left over from the main sheet track on one of the boats), which already had some 1/4" holes (same as the pivot pin), and added a short length of 1/4" bar stock - the anodizing they put on the aluminum extrusion made it a perfect press fit. With that bar centered up in the 4-jaw chuck (did the centering on the lathe, then moved over to the mill), and the part clamped to the flanges on the extrusion, I first milled the corners off the end:

and then swapped to a small rounding over bit, and did one more pass:

Then laid out and drilled the 5 rivet holes down each side of the base portion:

With the bracket centered up on a length of 1/4" rod and clamped in place, drilled the holes that were accessible, using the bracket itself as a drill guide for the bit, holding the bucket in place by hand on the mill table (with such a small bit there is not a lot of force on the part, so did not need to clamp it down). Did that on both brackets, then ran in the first rivets, removed the clamp, and drilled the remaining few holes.

Here is the first bracket in place - used the rivet former that I made during the Lombard build to put in all but the rivets in the upper corners, used a hammer on those since the former would not fit into that last corner.

Now there is just the latch plate for the door to make and install, and the bucket shell will be ready to prime and paint. Then it will be 12 pieces down, about 3000 to go!!
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 08:41:16 PM by crueby »

Offline mal webber

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #384 on: December 22, 2017, 09:30:26 PM »
That bucket is looking really good.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #385 on: December 22, 2017, 10:00:02 PM »
That bucket is looking really good.
Thanks Mal, looking forward to seeing it with the yoke and door on!

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #386 on: December 23, 2017, 12:12:24 AM »
Chris, are you going to finish Marion as a new girl or an experienced lady??

Wow!

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #387 on: December 23, 2017, 01:09:00 AM »
Chris, are you going to finish Marion as a new girl or an experienced lady??

Wow!

Pete
I'm thinking new, black frame and booms, deep red siding, unpainted steel tracks, white lettering along the siding under the roof line like their old catalog shows.

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #388 on: December 23, 2017, 01:58:11 AM »
Nice!! Either new or well used but not abandoned. 

 :popcorn: :popcorn:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Online crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #389 on: December 23, 2017, 02:22:18 AM »
Nice!! Either new or well used but not abandoned. 

 :popcorn: :popcorn:

Pete
Yeah, already have one like that!  Though it is likely to get better starting in the spring, with all the new attention.   :ThumbsUp: