Author Topic: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel  (Read 249081 times)

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2550 on: November 29, 2018, 06:26:50 PM »
Made up the stuffing gland for the valve control rod out of a bit of hex rod, threaded M5 on one end and drilled through for the control rod.



And got started on the valve slider - this looks like a standard D-valve slider, just is a little shorter since there are only two ports to go over - the output and the exhaust. The input port at the end just fills the steam chest. The slider was milled on the end of a offcut of bronze left over from one of the bearings. Milled to outside shape, then a recess milled in on the bottom to connect the two ports.



Drilled through above the recess for the control rod and the adjusting nut - these holes form the bottom of the slots. Did it this way since I do not have any end mills down this small.



Got out the air-powered rotary tool and a small dental burr, and squared up the recess opening and opened up the tops of the slot. This was done freehand with a strong magnifier.



Test fit of the slider in the steam chest - slot is good depth, think I will need to file a touch off the end of the slider to get proper flow on the ports.



The slider so far:



Time to make the control rod and the adjusting nut...

Offline Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2551 on: November 29, 2018, 06:55:32 PM »
Finer than a frog hair split four ways. I am almost as good as Don  :lolb:

Whiskey

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2552 on: November 29, 2018, 07:12:00 PM »
Finer than a frog hair split four ways. I am almost as good as Don  :lolb:

Whiskey
Dang, dog!    :Lol:

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2553 on: November 29, 2018, 08:41:12 PM »
That's some watchmaking style machining, right there. Parts look great! :popcorn:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2554 on: November 30, 2018, 01:44:07 AM »
That's some watchmaking style machining, right there. Parts look great! :popcorn:


Hopefully it will tick over nicely and not get all wound up!   :Lol:


 :cheers:

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2555 on: November 30, 2018, 02:40:59 AM »
GROAN


 :lolb:

Pete
Craftsman, Tinkerer, Curious Person.
Retired, finally!
SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2556 on: November 30, 2018, 07:55:02 PM »

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2557 on: November 30, 2018, 07:56:32 PM »
Not much shop time today (mothers birthday!), but I did make up the control rod and the adjusting nut for the slide valve on the clutch.

Next I need to decide on the best way to womp up a batch of small (for 1/8" OD tube) elbows.

Offline ddmckee54

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2558 on: November 30, 2018, 09:34:31 PM »
The best way to whomp up a batch of 1/8"OD elbows, I assume we're talking about one of those it looks like a threaded fitting type elbow?
Are you planning on threading the fitting onto the tube, or just soldering the straight tube onto the elbow?

The following is listed in depth of pocket order, from deepest to shallowest:
1 - Pay somebody else to do it.
2 - Pay somebody else to cast the blanks, and you machine the fiddly little suckers.  1'8" OD is not going to leave a lot of room for BOO-BOO's, better order 25-50% extra.  Who knows, if they don't come get you with one of those jackets that's all sleeves and zippers, you might even be able to SELL these things.
3 - Carve the patterns, cast the blanks, and you machine the fiddly little suckers.  You already know how fiddly they are going to be.
4 - Carve EACH and every one out of billet, you'll be WISHING you were making Lombard tracks again.

Don

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2559 on: November 30, 2018, 10:28:46 PM »
Hi Don,


Great list!


These small ones will just be soldered on, can look like common house plumbing elbows. The large pipes to the engines later on will be more of the flange type. I am probably heading to option 4, fortunately only 5 or 6 are needed. Probably will start with a length of flat bar, drill the holes down the side for the holes on one leg of each, and can mill out the excess between, leaving square posts with hole sticking out of the bar. Saw them apart, and make a little holding jig for the mill vise to drill the other legs. Then the tricky bit, rounding the legs. Jig in the lathe or rotab. That will leave the outside corner, which can be done one the sander. Bunch of steps, but all simple. I hope.


And I had fun doing the tracks and chains! Call me crazy.


Go ahead.


I'll wait...


Yup!   :insane:


I have no equipment or skills in casting, and its a lot more fun for me to make than buy them. It will be good practice for the bigger flanged ones later, which may be done like Kozo shows, as two pieces socketed and silver soldered at the elbow.

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2560 on: November 30, 2018, 10:39:49 PM »
Geesh...I'm gone just a couple of days and there always seems a week's worth of work (play) to catch up on.

 ;D
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2561 on: November 30, 2018, 10:55:54 PM »
Geesh...I'm gone just a couple of days and there always seems a week's worth of work (play) to catch up on.

 ;D


You just keep hoping I have started the Stanley engine!


 :cheers:

Offline zeeprogrammer

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2562 on: November 30, 2018, 11:26:02 PM »
Geesh...I'm gone just a couple of days and there always seems a week's worth of work (play) to catch up on.

 ;D


You just keep hoping I have started the Stanley engine!


 :cheers:

 :ThumbsUp:
Carl (aka Zee) Will sometimes respond to 'hey' but never 'hey you'.
"To work. To work."
Zee-Another Thread Trasher.

Offline cnr6400

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2563 on: December 01, 2018, 12:32:37 AM »
Chris, I remember in one of Kozo's books , maybe the Heisler one, he made several elbows by machining round bronze pieces to simulate the pipe and collar or flange, then mitred the ends, butted the mitres together at 90 degrees, and silver soldered the parts. After soldering he filed the excess off the outside corner and the silver solder formed a nice radius on the inside corner. After painting they looked just like a casting like the original would have been. It looked like minimal drill / cutter cleanup was needed inside the passageway of the elbow. I recall he left extra length on the pipe components to fixture the parts in a block with two V grooves at 90 degrees for soldering. This will work for any size elbow I think. Really big ones might need an extra middle segment and be mitred with 22 1/2 degree angles. Only mentioning it as food for thought for making your elbows. Hope it's useful.

One key tip about making elbows (or other parts) would be not to bend your own elbow too much beforehand...... :DrinkPint:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2564 on: December 01, 2018, 12:51:18 AM »
Chris, I remember in one of Kozo's books , maybe the Heisler one, he made several elbows by machining round bronze pieces to simulate the pipe and collar or flange, then mitred the ends, butted the mitres together at 90 degrees, and silver soldered the parts. After soldering he filed the excess off the outside corner and the silver solder formed a nice radius on the inside corner. After painting they looked just like a casting like the original would have been. It looked like minimal drill / cutter cleanup was needed inside the passageway of the elbow. I recall he left extra length on the pipe components to fixture the parts in a block with two V grooves at 90 degrees for soldering. This will work for any size elbow I think. Really big ones might need an extra middle segment and be mitred with 22 1/2 degree angles. Only mentioning it as food for thought for making your elbows. Hope it's useful.

One key tip about making elbows (or other parts) would be not to bend your own elbow too much beforehand...... :DrinkPint:
I'll have to get out his books again. I remember him showing a way where one leg was trurned to shape, and a end mill plunge cut halfway in to take the other leg. Niether had a miter. That was in the New Shay book, have to check the others too... Thanks for the tip.