Author Topic: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel  (Read 230612 times)

Offline kvom

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2355 on: November 03, 2018, 12:26:45 AM »
A flycutter might  be easier for those type slots.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2356 on: November 03, 2018, 12:35:19 AM »
A flycutter might  be easier for those type slots.
How would I go sideways to make a 3/8 wide slot with a flycutter?  I have only used one to do top surface cuts.

Offline Kim

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2357 on: November 03, 2018, 04:46:51 AM »
Nice work on the curved slots for the gears, Chris.

I think the idea would be to use a fly cutter 90o to the part to carve out the inside, not like you would to face a large area. Can't figure out how you'd shape the outside with a fly cutter. But maybe I'm misunderstanding Kvom?

Anyway, the way you did it worked mighty well!
Kim

Offline MJM460

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2358 on: November 03, 2018, 10:06:23 AM »
Hi Chris, your work and rate of progress continue to astound as always. 

Sorry to be a bit late to the party on that sandblasting experiment.  May I suggest that it is not surprising that you don't see too much immediate difference between paint applied over sand blasting or not.  The sand blasting is part of the surface treatment process.  It is absolutely important to a long lasting job.  The difference is more likely to show up after a bit of longer term operation, wear and tear.

I don't know how practical it is to do more of the job.  But a heavy duty system for severe corrosive environments would always start with a very thorough sand blast surface preparation.  In general, steel parts would benefit more than brass I would expect.  And you would not want to destroy carefully machined surfaces. 

So in general probably worthwhile when practical, especially on metals likely to corrode, but not dramatic when the paint is first applied.

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Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2359 on: November 03, 2018, 12:46:39 PM »
Hi Chris, your work and rate of progress continue to astound as always. 

Sorry to be a bit late to the party on that sandblasting experiment.  May I suggest that it is not surprising that you don't see too much immediate difference between paint applied over sand blasting or not.  The sand blasting is part of the surface treatment process.  It is absolutely important to a long lasting job.  The difference is more likely to show up after a bit of longer term operation, wear and tear.

I don't know how practical it is to do more of the job.  But a heavy duty system for severe corrosive environments would always start with a very thorough sand blast surface preparation.  In general, steel parts would benefit more than brass I would expect.  And you would not want to destroy carefully machined surfaces. 

So in general probably worthwhile when practical, especially on metals likely to corrode, but not dramatic when the paint is first applied.

MJM460
The painting over the blasted area was not really what I was testing. The original idea from derek was that the blasted area would come out greyer, so painting would not be needed. I only painted on the test piece to get a comparison between blasted and painted surfaces. End result was that the blasting did not do enough, and will continue to paint as normal. The ceramic infused engine paint is tough enough and adheres to the metal quite well.

Offline Flyboy Jim

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2360 on: November 03, 2018, 02:09:44 PM »
Jim, what coarseness grit (grit number?) did you use on that? The airbrush-style gun I have won't take larger grit sizes, so the finish is still pretty fine, looks like you were able to get a coarser finish.

Not sure about the coarseness of the sand Chris. I'm using a regular small sandblaster with a worn out 1 1/2 hp compressor at about 80psi.

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Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2361 on: November 03, 2018, 08:25:59 PM »
Continuing on with the travel gear holder, thinned the lower section of the side plates to size, and finished the inside corner with a ball end mill.

Also took a light truing cut on the top surface to even out the plates and the solder.

The axles are turned and the gears loctited in place. After that cures, will make the bronze bearings and start on the bearing caps. The top overhang and the braces out the sides still need to be made and added on, but its easier to hold in the mill vise to do the bearings before they get added on.



Offline Kim

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2362 on: November 04, 2018, 01:24:45 AM »
Looking mighty sharp there, Chris!

You may need to get the elves out there with the acetone and a shop rag.  Looks like some graffiti on your brass there.  Hey, maybe the elves are out tagging things at night?  Do you have rival elf gangs?  :ROFL:

Kim


Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2363 on: November 04, 2018, 01:35:25 AM »
Looking mighty sharp there, Chris!

You may need to get the elves out there with the acetone and a shop rag.  Looks like some graffiti on your brass there.  Hey, maybe the elves are out tagging things at night?  Do you have rival elf gangs?  :ROFL:

Kim


 :o


Explains the different colors the elf teams are wearing...   :Lol:




Actually that one is a note on the mesh distance on the two gear axles. I use permanent markers a lot on parts for layout lines, measurements, orientation notes, etc. Nice thing is that with a little alcohol on a tissue the marks come right off, as long as they haven't been there too many days.

Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2364 on: November 04, 2018, 02:31:42 AM »
Hi Chris , looking good..just a thought about how strong the lactate Loctite is ,so how much force would it take to "give"  say in foot pounds !!To move one of those gears on its shaft ?? :-\ :thinking:

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2365 on: November 04, 2018, 02:48:06 AM »
Hi Chris , looking good..just a thought about how strong the lactate Loctite is ,so how much force would it take to "give"  say in foot pounds !!To move one of those gears on its shaft ?? :-\ :thinking:
Good question, I have not done any calculations on that, but have never had it fail yet (always can be a first time!) The gears are around 3/8" thick (hoist gears even thicker) so there is a large surface area for it to grab. The times that I have tried turning two gears on same shaft against each other by hand, nothing moved. If any is likely to it would be the final gear, getting the most torque from the tracks. Time will tell, can always add a pin or screw if it does let go. On crankshafts I like to add taper pins as extra strength.

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2366 on: November 04, 2018, 06:41:43 PM »
Bit more done this morning on the travel gear train, made the blanks for the bearing caps, and drilled through for the axles:

Test fit on the axles, looks good, ready to round off the tops of the caps, then get started on the side webs:

Again, here is the render of the finished parts, the webs I am talking about are the thin overhangs and the braces at the bottom center, which provide a place to bolt through into the I-beams:

Offline Don1966

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2367 on: November 04, 2018, 06:56:00 PM »
Looking great and just some awesome work and you know ......I...........like.......  :Love:



 :cheers:
Don

Offline crueby

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2368 on: November 05, 2018, 02:38:19 PM »
The bearing caps have been rounded over as usual and assembled onto the main block:

Next up is the top plate and brackets, starting out with a piece of sheet stock for the top, that was sawn out and filed, it will be screwed to the top of the main block. The vertical brackets will be milled out of some more sheet stock, and silver soldered to this top plate, probably using some small screws or pins to keep them in place for soldering.

Oh, and the screw holes in the base have been filled with some JBWeld.

Offline RonGinger

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Re: Chris's Marion 91 Steam Shovel
« Reply #2369 on: November 05, 2018, 04:20:11 PM »
Since the webs are purely decoration to  make it look like the original have you considered attaching them with JB Weld? It would be simpler than the drilling and tapping and silver soldering. You could even create a small filet in the corners as a casting would have had. It will all be painted anyway.

 Even soft solder would do and might not require the pins.