Author Topic: alternative fuel?  (Read 1122 times)

Offline Art K

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alternative fuel?
« on: August 28, 2017, 02:21:13 AM »
While at the Badger Steam & Gas show I ran into an unexpected problem. I had been using two stroke mix from the chain saw & weed eater. The main reason was to lube the rod as Val uses blowby and the bearings are  sealed for the crank. Apparently one of the folks there was borderline in need of using oxygen, and the fumes from my engine made him sick. Does anyone have an alternative fuel that wouldn't relegate me to areas well away from the rest of the folks in the building. I had used the straight Stihl 2stroke mix with non-ethanol premium 92octane. Would alcohol work and if so what type of alcohol & what mix % would still lube the rod by blowby? As an aside I had a technical problem with Val and had to take it home with me Friday night. When I returned I discovered I had left my fuel at home and had a little fuel left which I mixed with Coleman fuel and it seemed to run fine. Do I not need nearly as much oil for blowby to lube the rod as I would for a 2 stroke?
Art

Offline Wolfgang

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2017, 08:04:55 AM »
Alkylate petrol works for me. I use it because I need to store my engines in the basement, and neither I nor my family like the smell of fuel in the house. Alkylate fuel has practically no smell. My engines run ok with it, just need minor adjustments of the carb settings.

It comes under various brand names, "Aspen" is the most common. They have mixtures ready for use with synthetic oil for 2-strokes and without oil for 4-strokes.

Downside is the cost, around 4 per liter here.

Wolfgang

Offline gbritnell

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 12:51:56 PM »
Hi Art,
I don't want to sound cruel and heartless but if I were in a situation of needing oxygen to survive I think I would have second thoughts about being in an environment of smoke, fumes and carbon monoxide.
That being said I wouldn't even consider alcohol as a fuel. The mixture is totally different and it attracts moisture. Some fellows use Coleman camp fuel with a touch of oil but you're still making fumes and carbon monoxide, it just smells prettier.
gbritnell
Talent unshared is talent wasted.

Offline Art K

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2017, 01:27:59 PM »
Thanks for your replies,
Wolfgang is Aspen any different than Coleman fuel?
George,
I am inclined to think that as well, but. I did use regular 2 stroke mix to lube the rod from blowby. Rather than try to mix Coleman fuel w/oil. I guess I should try mixing coleman & oil.
Art

Offline dieselpilot

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2017, 02:18:11 PM »
I don't think there is an equal to Aspen fuel in the US. Aspen certainly isn't available here. I've tried the various hardware store fuels SEF, Trufuel, etc., and while different than gas they still have significant odor usually like a paint thinner. One that might be different and I haven't tried is Stihl Motomix. Coleman fuel isn't much different than gasoline, but maybe not as pungent.

Being tuned rich or started often would make for a lot of waste gasses. Oil in the mix at light engine loads and low operating temperatures is not likely to be burned. If odors were a nuisance, a different fuel may help. If it was the byproducts, only propane seems to make big difference.

Offline Wolfgang

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2017, 01:45:09 PM »
Art, Aspen is not Coleman's fuel. Coleman's fuel is usually considered as to low in octane rating for high performance engines, but some use it for model engines. I have not tried it myself.
Aspen is mainly made for chainsaws, lawn mowers, and the like. It also works well in my RC helicopters. It is used a lot over here, but I could not find a source for it or other alkylate fuel in the US. Seems strange, maybe someone else has better luck with a search.
Wolfgang

Offline GordonL

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2017, 05:13:56 PM »
I have given a couple of half hearted attempts at using propane but never really had much luck. It would help the smell problem or at least give a different smell. I think that the carbon monoxide is still pretty much the same. A friend of mine uses propane an all of his engines.

Online Tennessee Whiskey

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2017, 05:25:47 PM »
When running my Red Wing on both gasoline and Colemans I did notice that it ran considerably cooler on the gasoline. The smell was more pleasant on Colemans, but, it would set the carbon monoxide alarm off if run long enough.

Cletus

Offline Rustkolector

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Re: alternative fuel?
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2017, 07:27:49 PM »
Art,
I don't believe there is a good liquid fuel for model engines that doesn't have some odor. I think camp fuel is probably as good as it gets. You just have to watch that your engine isn't running rich. Coleman is pretty close to naptha and is the model fuel I use, but I did notice that Walmart is now selling Crown camp fuel. I haven't tried it yet. These fuels are particularly good in that they leave little or no residue when they evaporate. Regarding lubrication, I found it interesting that a friend of mine has been running his low speed 4 stroke multi-cylinder model engines on camp fuel with a little Marvel Mystery oil added. He has done this for years. He uses a 60:1 ratio and his engines have enclosed crankcases. The cylinders and bottom ends are totally lubricated by the MMO blow-by oil. His models run in the 500-600 RPM range normally, but he usually has to mop up surplus oil that has accumulated in the crankcases of his engines after a show. A side benefit is that MMO has a little oil of Wintergreen added which helps disguise the fuel fumes. If your engine doesn't run under much load and at reasonably low speed, a 50:1 MMO mix might work for you. Chain saw oil is a bit heavy and is for really hard working high speed engines.
Jeff