Author Topic: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT  (Read 17027 times)

Offline smfr

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2012, 04:30:10 PM »
Wow, lots of progress there, Marcello, with some neat setups. And a problem shared is a problem halved, right? :D

Simon

Offline arnoldb

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2012, 06:57:30 PM »
You're really making short but great work of this one Marcello  :ThumbsUp:

Kind regards, Arnold
Building an engine takes Patience, Planning, Preparation and Machining.
Procrastination is nearly the same, but it precludes machining.
Thus, an engine will only be built once the procrastination stops and the machining begins!

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #32 on: October 09, 2012, 08:43:13 AM »
Quote
And a problem shared is a problem halved

You mean the broken piston rod?
That was really stupid of me. 

Though it was THE  ::) good occasion to use a salvaged LH tool head a friend of mine had welded to a shank for me...



It was not.  :wallbang:

Marcello
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 10:31:41 AM by mzt »
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #33 on: October 09, 2012, 08:52:12 AM »
Valve rod and Valve packnut

Little to say about the three diameters (1.5 / 1.9 and 2mm) valve silver steel rod besides having made it into
a 2/1.5mm ER32 collet using a sharp tool at max speed.
The brass bracket to link it to the eccentric strap took much more time: I started from a piece of brass I picked up
from the brass swarfs bucket, slotted the thing, drilled two cross holes 1.5 and 1.6mm, tapped the second M2 and filed
away all the unwanted metal. 
It took a couple of hours, mostly spent on the four legs among the swarfs cluttering the floor.



Marcello

This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #34 on: October 10, 2012, 10:59:20 AM »
Steam chest cover

Got curious about the aesthetical results if I had the brass steam chest sandwiched between C.I. cyl. and cover.
Put a C.I. end  (probably from the Bernays pistons) between fixed jaw and V-block (is it the right way, or was
it between movable jaw and V-block? Fixed jaw sounds better.)



Whatever was the correct way, this setup is much likely to end with a milled down V-block.
No V-block, and that?s it.




Contented myself with zeroing the DRO somewhere near the centre of the workpiece and drilled four 2mm holes at coordinates.
Then, milled out the periphery at coordinates again, plus a little allowance for filing to a decent  finish and size.
Had the (good) idea of removing the wp. from the vice at that point, to sandpaper the external surface while still
attached to a block you can hold firmly in the hands.
Back in the vice, raised on stacked cheap man?s parallels,  I chucked a slitting saw to cut a groove on the four sides
acting as a guide for the hacksaw. Next, came the smoothing of the inner surface, and it was not a quick job.







 
Valve and Valve Nut

I spent more time hunting for a suitable piece into the brass scraps box than machining the valve itself.
As usual when working at max speed with 1.5 / 2mm milling bits I took no pictures of the works, it is just the
camera not coming to mind in those moments.
Snapped nothing, and the valve fits (and floats) well.



Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline NickG

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #35 on: October 11, 2012, 09:15:25 PM »
It is looking stunning  :ThumbsUp:

Offline steamer

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #36 on: October 12, 2012, 02:13:13 AM »
Marcello,

It is very evident to me you like cutting metal!   Nice job on the valve chest!

Dave
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline Don1966

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2012, 03:16:34 AM »
Great job Marcello, love the photos. Your making fast progress on this engine.

Don

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #38 on: October 12, 2012, 07:50:54 AM »
Quote

It is very evident to me you like cutting metal!
Dave

Putting it back where it should be is part of the fun, too!
(sometimes)

Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #39 on: October 12, 2012, 11:36:39 AM »
Valve rod pin, Steam intake and Crosshead guides

The pin into one of my cross drilling jigs: being too long to fit the hole already present into the jig at the correct length,
I used two washers as spacers, then kept it in place using the toolmakers clamp.




The 1.5mm dia. pin, cross-drilled 0.7., sitting on the clamp  (and that was the one thing I wanted to be shown in the pic...).




If it were not for the steam outtake, the engine would be complete.
Had to cheat a little when the four steel spacers on the crosshead cleaned a bit too short.
A couple of filing strokes on the lower face of the upper rails solved the light binding I had when they were fully tightened.




She could do with studs and nuts, but ain?t much happy with the idea.
Definitely, She cannot do without some washers. I do not have any washers in those sizes.
That problem was solved (somehow).



Oh, YES! She runs.
I did not tell You before but, a few days ago, when the steam inlet and the upper rails of the crosshead were still
missing and there was a drill bit in place of the valve rod pin...   I could not resist.

Yesterday with all the bits and pieces in place I had her running from 0.25 to 2.5 bar of air. Did not go over that,
not without some kind of load on the shaft. I am pleased with her.

Now, for some more washers, cleaning and a base.
 
Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline steamer

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #40 on: October 13, 2012, 02:00:50 AM »
Quote

It is very evident to me you like cutting metal!
Dave

Putting it back where it should be is part of the fun, too!
(sometimes)

Marcello

 :ROFL:
"Mister M'Andrew, don't you think steam spoils romance at sea?"
Damned ijjit!

Offline NickG

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #41 on: October 13, 2012, 10:55:28 AM »
Brilliant Marcello, I love it  :ThumbsUp: Might make my project list this one now!

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #42 on: November 12, 2012, 10:31:32 AM »

Wood Base

I used a couple of grub screws, inserted upside down, to transfer the position of the M6 holes to the wood base,
 



then drilled and counter bored the wood board for two SH screws.
 


 


Next post will be into the Showcase.

Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.

Offline Jo

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #43 on: November 12, 2012, 05:20:20 PM »
Looks good :ThumbsUp:, your choice of materials means that you can happily get away with out painting it. ;)

Are you going to add a "maker's plaque " to show who and when it was made?

Jo
Usus est optimum magister

Offline mzt

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Re: Elmer's #33 Mill Engine - MZT
« Reply #44 on: November 14, 2012, 08:38:43 AM »
Quote
Are you going to add a "maker's plaque " to show who and when it was made?

No, they're toys.
Marcello
This is a fitting job,
not a production job that can be measured in.