Author Topic: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama  (Read 23757 times)

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #525 on: November 11, 2017, 09:19:06 PM »
Oh my goodness Jason.  :o
These are stunning photos!
Thank you for sharing and giving the information.
John

Offline simplyloco

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #526 on: November 12, 2017, 12:21:41 PM »
John
I like the idea of a small geared motor. What is the torque and revs of yours please?
John
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Thankfully, I don't have to do much!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #527 on: November 12, 2017, 01:18:59 PM »
Hi John,
These little gearhead motors are very easily found on the internet are very inexpensive. When I opening the packaging I was disappointed with the size of the little motor atop the gearbox. I looked like a little toy motor.

Boy,was I wrong. The torque is in the gearbox. You can order the motor in a wide choice of RPM's. I chose the highest - 100 RPM. It is a 12 volt DC motor John. I also bought the speed controller that is often featured with the motor.

If all works out, I should be able to simulate the bearm beginning to move and slowly coming to a pleasing, slow stroke. Hopefully, no external impetus, like your hand cranking the flywheel to get it going will be seen.

Thanks for asking.

John

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #528 on: November 13, 2017, 10:45:18 AM »
It has come time to attach this litle motor to the friction axle. I have been asking my wife to help me turn the diorama up onto its back to mount the bearings under its floor, but now, I'd like to be able to have it sitting upright whie adjustments can be made to the amount of tension to add to the friction pulley and at same time rotate the wheel in its proper vertical orientation. You can't really test things when the model is lying on its back.

Ergo the saw horses. Now all I need is a rolling mechanic's trolley to work under the model on my back.  ;D

Online mklotz

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #529 on: November 13, 2017, 02:59:58 PM »
I hope you have the diorama firmly anchored to those two boards spanning the horses.  I wouldn't want to think that an inadvertent bump or jostle could land months of dedicated work in a pile on the floor.  With a crawler bumping the horses themselves is also a possibility.

Another approach to consider would be to anchor the diorama to tall blocks placed on a table and slip a large mirror underneath.  (My aged back can't tolerate crawlers so I tend to think of solutions like this.)
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Offline steam guy willy

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #530 on: November 13, 2017, 03:24:04 PM »
Hi This is the oil pot as used in the1836 engine that is still running in the Ramm Brewery in Wandsworth.............

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #531 on: November 13, 2017, 04:02:23 PM »
Thanks for the photo.

I see the concern Marv. I'm getting up there when it comes to getting down and up again!   :old:

The horses are high enough that I was earlier able to just reach under the floor of the model and loosen the pillow block nuts by feel to remove them.

I cut the axle to its correct length and did manage to get under the model on my back and reach up to refasten the blocks to their studs.

Tom, you were right when you suggested that the model could be simply raised if a wheel extended below the base of the diorama. I used  maple dowels cut to 1/2" to put under the round feet.

Offline J.L.

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First Trial
« Reply #532 on: November 14, 2017, 10:35:44 PM »
I am over the moon with this first trial!  :pinkelephant:

The first synchronous AC motor I purchased is bring used here to establish friction contact.  I gently pushed against the bearing block nearest the flywheel and away she went! :cartwheel:

It is a 25 RPM motor turning the engine over at 7.5 RPM.

The engine is soundless and the beam is beautiful to watch. Unfortunately, it is running a tad slow. I think 16 RPM was the top speed for pumping beam engines with large flywheels.

We will test next a second motor - a 100 RPM 12 volt DC motor that can be speed controlled.

Noise may be a factor. I have ordered a third 60 RPM DC motor of different design just in case...



Online b.lindsey

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #533 on: November 14, 2017, 11:00:45 PM »
That is great news John, not that I had any doubts!! Obce you are happy with the speed, I hope to see a video of her running. The recent pictures of the diorama, even less the gallery, look great!!

Bill

Offline Ian S C

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #534 on: November 15, 2017, 02:16:47 AM »
Your drive system reminds me of how we start our Ruston Hornsby HR-6 at the museum, we have a 2 cylinder lLisrer petrol motoer with one of the rubber tired wheels from a Bren Gun Carrieron its out put shaft that can be swung against the flywheel of the Ruston. first we charge the air cylinder for the Ruston, turn the engine over, and by that means start the Lister(saves cranking), there is then plenty of time to start the Ruston without the air. after the first start I often just use the air start, but as the Ruston lays idle most of the year it can be hard to get going at first.  In later years than your diarama, the horizontal , 28hp Ruston would fit in the same possition as the beam engine.
Ian S C

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #535 on: November 15, 2017, 08:39:37 PM »
Thanks Bill. A video is definitely in the cards.

Thanks for the info Ian.

Now that I am going to try a 12 volt DC motor, I am using an AC adaptor. 

Tom, remember that little tray of goodies that came with the kit?  In it were several machined glands. I used one to make a female plug for the adaptor.  The central brass pin was turned and pressed into a turned piece of Lexan plastic.

I just could not see an electrical cord attached to the model.

I know the sockets are readily available online, but I wanted to try making one myself.

Offline wagnmkr

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #536 on: November 15, 2017, 10:55:55 PM »
Looking very good John ... I told you that those "extras" would be useful.

Cheers

Tom
I was cut out to be rich ... but ... I was sown up all wrong!

Offline J.L.

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #537 on: November 17, 2017, 10:19:11 PM »
Thanks Tom. You are right. Those little pieces are continuing to find use in this diorama.


We are building a steam engine. Any exposure to wiring, motors, speed controllers, in my opinion must be minimized. We are thinking in the 19th century with this build, not electrically driven machines.  So I wanted to downplay any suggestion of an electric drive for this beam engine.

From above, you have no hint that there is a friction wheel hidden in the flywheel pit. So I am loathe to having a motor or a speed controler seen even from the back of the diorama. Plans are in place to build a cubpboard in the engine room that will conceal all evidence of an electric system.

Here we see a discrete port for the 12 volt adaptor plug. I did not like the look of the socket mounted in view on the outside of the exterior wall.  :disagree:

« Last Edit: November 17, 2017, 10:28:02 PM by J.L. »

Offline 10KPete

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #538 on: November 17, 2017, 11:23:10 PM »
It's attention to that sort of "out  of sight" detail that makes your dioramas so good, John.
I'm really enjoying this build...

Pete
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SB 10K lathe, Benchmaster mill. And stuff.

Online b.lindsey

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Re: Stuart Beam Engine in Diorama
« Reply #539 on: November 18, 2017, 12:24:23 AM »
 That's about as hidden as things can get John. Nicely done.

Bill